BMW 'Goodwill'

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Um no, an automatic can be overreved, all it would take is a faulty rev limiter.

In the USA it had a 4 year warranty. Just be glad you're not in the rest of Europe where it's only a 1 year warranty.
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No, the rev limiter acts on the engine. The auto box changes up before you hit it. And won't allow a downshift near it.
So you'd need two failures in practise.
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PractiCe.
You have been reading American-dominated newsgroups for too long...
<grin> DAS
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Dori A Schmetterling wrote:

Actually, a search for the word "practise" revealed the following:
pracทtise v. & n. Chiefly British
Variant of practice.
(Source: The American Heritageฎ Dictionary of the English Language)
So, the Americans think practiSe is British.
:-)
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Well, what do you expect from an American dictionary...
In English we spell the noun with a c and the verb with an s. There are other such examples.
I didn't say the Brit English (as Americans might say) way is more sensible....
Dave Plowman lives in London (England, that is, not Canada, USA or even Germany).
DAS
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Dori A Schmetterling wrote:

What the heck does that mean? Practice is spelled the same way in America. Or are you just insinuating that Americans can't spell properly?
-Fred W
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LoL. I don't recollect seeing an American ever write it with a C.
A look at Merriam-Webster online shows confusion, in that practice appears to be shown shown with either spelling for any usage. A bot like Peter Bozz's finding in the American Heritage Dictionary.
However, the Oxford makes the correct way clear: http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/practice?view=uk
With C: noun in Brit English. With S: verb in Brit, noun and verb in American.
Now, whether Americans can spell properly? That I can't answer...probably no more or less than anybody else in the English-speaking world. But they do spell some things differently, uniquely so because the rest of them (South Africa, AU, NZ etc) follow UK. Canada is supposed to, too, but obviously cannot escape the pervasive influence of its southern neighbour, and so tends to follow US norms.
And if you are in business in CA it is even harder e.g. with measurements. Although CA is metric anything supplied to the US has to be Imperial/American standard, so people get wrapped up in this and forget metres and litres...
DAS
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Dori A Schmetterling wrote:

And I would guess, based partly on the spelling of your last sentence, that "Brittish english" is heavily influenced by you neighbors across the creek to your right. The words pronounced 'mE-t&r and 'lE-t&r are spelled (and pronounced as they appear) metre and litre in French.
-Fred W
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Oh dear, oh dear, oh DEAR.
British English... one "t" in the first word, capital at the beginning of the second....:-)
I don't understand what you mean given that English is an evolution of (Norman) French. They are probably more influenced by English than vice versa. Their Academie Francaise is frantically trying to prevent the use of English words.
http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/litre?view=uk
(US liter)
. noun a metric unit of capacity, formerly the volume of one kilogram of water under standard conditions, now equal to 1,000 cubic centimetres (about 1.75 pints).
- DERIVATIVES litreage noun.
- ORIGIN French, from Greek litra, a Sicilian monetary unit
Just for fun try "liter" in Merriam-Websters and then click on the Britannica link. Funny how the spelling changes to "litre". Britannica might be American-owned but it has an English (British English to you) heritage.
A meter is a device that measures something. You know the sort of thing? Thermometer. Light meter.
Remember what I said. Americans spell some words in a unique fashion.
You'll probably get the hang of it eventually.
DAS
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Sorry, you don't know what you talk about. Americans write practice with a C not an S, both the verb and the noun.

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Can I now grovel and say I've been whipped to within an inch of my life - nice, any more offers - because I got one letter wrong. I've already burnt my spool cheeker.
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No, too many 13 hour working days on the trot... ;-)
But I haven't picked up the American habit of top posting. ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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:-D
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Paul Aspinall wrote:

car is, well alot of money. However, servicing "in accordance with requirements" will result in trouble down the road, especially if you expect your car to last 200,000 miles.
For example, your car supposedly comes with "lifetime" transmission and differential fluids. Yet, its common knowledge that the "lifetime" fluids are exactly the same as those used when BMW recommended changes every 30,000 miles. Do you really think your transmission and differential fluid will last 200,000 miles, without changing? I wouldn't. The fact is BMW doesn't care. As stated, they are in the business of selling cars.
Basicially, if you can afford, to spend the big bucks on a 2002 7 Series, why are you so concern about the car lasting 200,000 miles? You obvious can afford to replace your car more frequently than most, so I say do it!
Otherwise, despite BMW claim of "lifetime" fluids, I think its crap and would follow the old service schedule:
- Coolant - every 2 years (with only BMW coolant/Zerex G-48) - Brake fluid - flush every 2 years; unless you track your car, then every year - Transmission and Differential - every 30,000 miles (use synthetic like Redline) - Engine oil - since all new BMWs now come with synthetic, I would look
to change engine oil and filter every 7K+ miles depending on driving conditions.
Add in replace your radiator/waterpump/thermostat every 60,000-80,000 miles too Further, with BMW V8s, you need to keep an eye on: - valve cover gaskets replaced between 75,000-90,000 mile mark; - intake manifold gaskets need replacing at about 100,000 miles and I think you need to keep an eye out on the power steering pump lines too.
All in all, keep it maintained religiously and it just might last to 200K. Now about those electrical gremlins.....
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That does not matter. What matters is that it has been tested to last for a certain period.
Such long-term test programmes can be an expensive hassle so are perhaps they are not carried out as often as we would like. Much easier to just say "it's good for 30 000 miles" than test for 100 000. The latter costs the car manufacturer far more...
DAS
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Reality doesn't agree with what you believe. A Bentley Arnage and a Rolls-Royce Phantom cost 2-3 times as much as a 745Li, and they have a 3-year warranty. A Ferrari 612 and a Lamborghini Murcielago also costs 2-3 times as much and have only a 2-year warranty. A Hyundai costs a fraction of what a 745Li costs, and the warranty of a Hyundai is 5 years. So, if you want to assume anything (and I don't think you can), one can assume that cars that cost more have shorter warranties, not the other way around.
And if you think about it, it makes some sense. First, the more a car costs, the less price sensitive the buyer is. The less sensitive the buyer is, the less likely the person is to be driving an old car, so longer warranties make less sense on a $100K car than on a $20K one. Second, warranty is a marketing tool more than anything else. Less expensive brands lengthen their warranties compared to the competition to try to get more buyers, and prominently display their warranties on commercials. Buyers of more expensive cars care much less about that. A buyer of a $100K car should have no problem paying for a non-warranty repair, and the repair would be more an annoyance than a financial setback. A buyer of a $20K car, on the other hand, could be financially strained if having to pay for a major repair.
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wrote:

Well stated, Marcio.
Over here, Hyundai is offering 10 year warranties now. Does that mean their engineering is that much superior to what it was 3 years ago? Of course not. It's a marketing tool, that is more important in the lower end, as you point out.
-Russ.
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If customer satisfaction can be used as part-measurement of improved engineering, then we can say that Hyundai has improved in this area. I say part-measurement because clearly there are other factors to consider when measuring 'engineering superiority', which I believe you use to mean longevity, as opposed to power-to-weight ratios, front/rear balance, tolerances between body panels, or even MPG, for example. While it's true that a warranty is in-part a marketing tool, I think it's safe to assume they [Hyundai] are also now more confident in the longevity of their product, than they were during the days of the Excel. If not, then what a gamble to play with the risk of having to honour warranties when they fail before the 10/100 limit is reached.
It's amusing to me that Hyundai has taken the place more recently of Skoda as the poster boy for poor quality. Does anyone even make Skoda jokes any more? ;-)
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Neil wrote:

Certainly not on this side of the Atlantic (left). We don't even know what a Skoda looks like...
Over here, Hyundai is getting a better rep now, while Kia and Scion seem to have taken over the lowest spots.
-Fred W
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Skoda has been taken over by VW some 10 years ago. Today all Skodas are more or less the same quality than VWs, they are based on the same platform, share engines and powertrains. VW quality may not be best on the market if you compare it with Lexus or Toyota, but it definitely is not bad enough to use it for jokes. The Skodas of the soviet era have virtually disappeared from the streets of western Europe, while a contemporary Skoda Octavia seems to be a god alternative to the new VW Jetta, because it looks better, is cheaper and shares the mailn technical components.
Frank
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