BMW 'Goodwill'

Page 4 of 4  


I think Hyundai engineering is in fact much superior than what it was 3 years ago. It would be financial suicide for a company to greatly increase the warranty without improving the product. Perhaps the correct question would be, "does that mean that engineering at Hyundai is that much superior than manufacturers offering 3 year warranties?" Of course not.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It's superior, but not 3 times as superior to what it was. The cars are not going to be failure free for 10 years. They're just betting they can take the revenue now, to build business, and affort to pay out the claims later.
-Russ.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Are you selling any of that? I don't even care what it is, it has to be pretty good shit if it makes you wonder if the factory is going to take part in a welfare progam for the very rich.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well... they never covered some stuff in the warranty on my previous 740's, because they were high milers.... 100000 miles....
And they put things down to 'wear and tear' which wasn't covered..... yet.... I still got them to make a contribution.....
So.... there you go.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you really have to ask....the only sensible advice is: Get out now while you can still make it someone else's problem...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you take care of your car and DO THE THINGS YOU R SUPPOSE TO do to your vehicle BMW WILL KNOW. YOUR CAR WILL ADJUST TO THE WAY YOU DRIVE. When was the last time you change your tranny oil ?.how old is your car how many miles on your car?. All these things come into play so tell me what is wrong with your car?.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Paul Aspinall wrote:

The initial pricetag of the car has absolutely nothing to do with how long they will warrant the engine and gearbox. Witness the Hyundais with their 100k mile powertrain warranty across the entire inexpensive line.
By the way, your expectations do not jive with reality. There are *no* car companies that offer a 200k mile warranty on powertrains.
If you *need* to have the car covered by warranty then you had better go out and buy one no matter what the price of it. OTOH, if you need the money more than the warranty you can either take your chances and keep the money in your pocket or get rid of the car. Let's face it, the chances are pretty slim you'll ever incur repair charges that even equal the cost of the warranty or else the warranty companies would go broke.

I personally have not, but have heard many 3rd and 4th hand stories where BMW picked up either all, or more often a part, of the cost of the repair if they feel there was a design flaw which was in part responsible for the failure. Considering that I have heard no such claims about the modern 745's (with either engine or transmissions) I would expect to be completely on your own should you now have a failure out of warranty.
Ya buys yer ticket and ya yakes yer chances...
-Fred W
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What follows are my opinions, which may differ from those of others.
I think it's fair to want a more expensive car to last as long if not longer than a cheaper car, but the reality is that you're not paying more for a BMW than a Ford solely because of the expectation that it will have a longer life. For your money you're also getting prestige, performance, exclusivety, handling, creature comforts, etc.
The fact is that your technically superior BMW while better in 9 out of 10 categories for example, may well not last as long as a Ford before requiring expensive maintenance. Factors that may affect the need for maintenance of your BMW include the previously mentioned creature comforts (the greater the number of moving parts and electrical components the increased likelihood that something will go wrong), and the fact that BMW produce fewer vehicles than Ford meaning fewer economies of scale.
I suspect if your car failed outside of warranty, that you'd get little goodwill. Possible exception might be if it failed after just passing the mileage limit, but I'm speculating.
I agree that ideally, life span of engine/transmission and any other component would be directly related to the price you pay, but that would mean those of use that can't afford a car that costs more money than we earn in 2 years, would be stuck with more affordable vehicles that only last 20,000 miles.
I can certainly see the appeal of leasing a new BMW and returning it for a new model at the end of the lease period. If I had the funds to be able to purchase a 745Li, I'd do it with the expectation that I may have to spend significant sums on maintenance the longer I kept it.
As a side note, there's a 1991 750il with only 88k miles advertised for sale locally to me, and the seller only wants $4,000. I don't expect what was once BMW's flagship vehicle to last another 112k miles before requiring what is likely to be very expensive engine or transmission work, notwithstanding the fact that the vehicle may have been abused.
I hope my reply comes across as more empathetic than those of others, as that was my intention. It's surprising to me that you should receive such unempathic responses from a group that -- I think it's fair to assume -- are in a similar position regarding costs of purchasing and maintaining what some consider the best* cars in the world.
Of course the fact that others are in the same metaphorical boat would explain the automatic reaction of 'look before you leap'. It's my experience with many usenet groups, that there are many more silent individuals agreeing with you, than there are those that disagree and say as much.
*If not measured by cost of ownership.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nice post (and I'm not being sarcastic.)

I would agree with your speculation: don't count on goodwill. Although BMW has decided *in specific instances* to cover some things or extend warranties (note the recent M3 engine problems and the nikasil problems in the '90s), unless they decide it's their fault in design/testing, it's not gonna happen. Remember, they buy transmissions from Getrag and GM, and parts from other suppliers that have met BMW's "spec". Another thing to note is that the dealer is only re-imbursed by BMW at specific rates and for only the warranty period - you have to ask if your dealer would cover the cost out of their till, or go to the trouble to get the work re-imbursed by BMW for out-of-warranty repairs.

In most cases (note recent GM advertisements for Allison transmissions in GMC/Chevy trucks in the US), lifetimes beyond around 100K are not important to most consumers and manufacturers. A BMW is just a car, and has only to compete with other cars.
On the subject of the tone of responses, don't forget that many BMW aficionados are "old school", work on their own cars, love 2002s, E12s and such, don't think much of the complexity of the newer BMWs, and look down on the nouveau-BMW-buyers.
Floyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

This is a good point, if not particularly comforting to newcomers to the marque, and/or purchasers of anything newer than an E36 perhaps.
It's funny because back when the E28 was new, I remember reading an article in a UK automotive magazine saying something along the lines of your average non-BMW service centre not having the technology available to be able to correctly service anything in the E28 range *above* the 518i. I might be some what off on the details, but my point is that what the home mechanic of 1985 was able to cope with was far less than the home mechanic of today. Who knows, perhaps in 20 years time my new-born daughter will be servicing the iDrive in her old school E90!
I'd certainly like to return to the early 80s when I recall fellow "BM" owners waving to one another as they pass. You didn't need to join a car club or internet forum back then to feel part of a community.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 May 2005 13:09:20 -0400, "Neil"

    Exactly. When I owned a '66 Silver Shadow, everyone was amazed I worked on it, citing it's incredibly complex technology. That tech was complex all right - when I was born! The car was incredibly simple to work on - the engine bay had scads more room than anything I've ever owned.     I also heard the opposite once on a Porsche 356 list - a shop owner insisting that a 356 couldn't be properly aligned without the latest Hunter alignment laser technology. How prescient of the Porsche engineers to build a car that would stay aligned for 50 years, until technology could catch up!

    Even if I restricted myself to only waving at other E46s, my arm would fall off - they're everywhere.     Emanuel
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good reply
Thanks for the constructive commenst to the post.
Cheers
wrote

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I had been thinking exactly that even before you posted this.
An apposite anecdote, even if it refers only to shoes: Last week I walked into a Bally shoe shop to complain that my Bally shoe wasn't standing up to wear and tear as well as my Clark's shoe at about half the price.
If substituting "BMW/car" for "shoe" the answer from the salesperson was just about a copy of your comments below.
DAS
For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
--
"Neil" < snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.invalid.com> wrote in message
news:429346bb$0$79453$ snipped-for-privacy@news.sunsite.dk...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Many thanks for your constructive response.
I am merely trying to elicit opinions, and get the views.... Some agree, some disagree.... thats fair enough to me.....
I agree with your sentiments that we should expect more from a car bought at 78000, than one for 18000 It seems there are too many 'smart as**s' in the NG, who have probably never been in the position of having a 78000 car on their hands, and therefore are unsympathetic to those that do.
Thanks for your comments and constructive discussion

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You're *really* hung up on the snob value of the original sticker price of the car, aren't you?
You need to understand that cars like 7 series BMWs depreciate in value nearly as fast as 1990s dotcom stocks. I don't think many here are going to be impressed by its original sticker price, in fact, those of us who spend that kind of money on buying and running a new car expect to lose substantially. The only cars in that class that I have owned that retain a reasonable value long term have been NSXs. I'm sure (?) there are others, but that has been my only positive experience. A decent early 90s NSX still fetches 25K. A 5 year old 7 *might* possibly fetch that much. If you can't afford to pay the price, then don't play.
HTH. HAND.
--
Dan.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I thought that. I'm not sure why he feels the need to keep saying "my car cost 78,000 you know". Some might suggest it's a deep seated insecurity and a missing sense of self-worth.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm looking around to find somebody that's sympathetic. Surely he's around here someplace.
Too bad the dealer hid the warranty from you when you bought the car.
-Russ.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Many cars will do this sort of mileage on the original power train if well maintained and driven sympathetically. But then many drivers don't give a toss about their cars and cane them from cold. Because they change them long before this mileage. As do most who buy a *new* 78,000 quid car. And in the UK such a car will invariably not belong directly to the first driver - it will be company owned or leased.
I'd guess you haven't bought the car from new, but expect BMW to be generous with a warranty even although you don't know how the car was treated in its earlier life.

They're more likely to on a one owner car with full main dealer service history.
--
*Succeed, in spite of management *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi,
wrote:

The drive shaft broke down on my 2002 e39 530dA touring in January - around 160.000 kms' driven. They did not contribute anything. Replacement cost around 500. Car fully serviced at BMW.
It took three weeks for them to get the spare parts - and that is what really bothered me... I would expect BMW to be better than that on getting the spare parts quicker.
** Lars
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.