BMW Unveils 57 mpg 3-series Sedan For Europe

Americans don't like diesel . American's won't accept four-cylinders in a luxury sedan. Americans are afraid of Jell-O. OK, that last one probably isn't true,
but the first two are accepted wisdom in the automotive world. But today, BMW announced a new 320d 3-series sedan for the Frankfurt Motor Show that makes all three of those ... Read More: http://www.motorauthority.com/blog/1034500_bmw-unveils-57-mpg-3-series-sedan-for-europe
----------------------------------- BMW NewsHub: Latest auto news sourced from websites, portals and blogs http://www.carshops247.co.uk/news/BMW.html
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On Aug 23, 11:12 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

Two problems with this statement. Its not that Americans don't like diesel, but unlike you folks in Europe, America's infrastructure is not designed for diesel fuel, i.e., not every gas station carries it. Second, in America, gasoline is cheaper than diesel because Americans do not pay anywhere near the taxes you do. Therefore, diesel cars and trucks are slower sellers in America.

Yup. Since BMW markets its cars as *luxury,* its cars are loaded up to maximize profit. Therefore, you won't get 4 cylinder engines, wind-up windows or cloth seats. You also won't find BMW exporting its 1 Series hatchback to America either :(

over here in AMERICA!!!
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In article

Is it really that uncommon? Don't large trucks use it?

Diesel is more expensive in the UK too - and has been for some time.
Thing is the difference in fuel consumption between diesel and petrol engines has narrowed considerably as petrol engines become more efficient and diesel more refined and powerful.
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On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 09:33:49 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

I don't know where "Fong" resides, but in New England, diesel is easily available at most stations.

That makes little sense - gasoline is taxed by both state and federal entities just as heavily as diesel, if not more so.

The issues with diesel in the US has been the sulfur content vs federal and state EPA anti-pollution mandates. We just didn't have the refinery capabilities to remove enough of the sulfur to meet the requirements, hence in many states (particularly those who follow the California laws) it has been illegal to sell new diesel-equipped passenger vehicles (although one could buy diesel "pickup" trucks, even in those states). However, now that ultra-low sulfur fuel has become widely available, these restrictions are being relaxed or even rescinded.
Another issue with diesel was the lack of acceptance by the public to own what was perceived as a noisy, smelly vehicle. Not to mention the disastrous attempt by General Motors to produce a diesel-burning engine from a gasoline engine. There are still plenty of people that remember that farce.
fwiw, historically, the price of gasoline was higher than that of diesel in the USA. In the last few years, that relationship swung around in the other direction. Ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel has additional refinery costs, and the base stock is also used to produce heating oil (widely used in the Northeast)...
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Although readily available, fewer than 1/2 the stations in the Seattle area carry diesel. No Costco stations carry it, for instance, because it's not a volume product (snicker). Arco doesn't carry it AFAIK. My guess is that it's probably 1/4 or less carry diesel. Fortunately, Safeway carries it, but only at 2/8 islands typically.
Large trucks usually use specialty fueling stations (truck stops) or private fueling stations at the marshalling yards/warehouses.

In the Seattle area, diesel currently costs about the same as the mid-grade fuel (95 octane to those of you in the UK/EU).
FYI, I'm interested in this as I just ordered a 335d; probably get here end of Sept.
FloydR
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My neighbour has a new 535d auto - and the performance is awesome. Reckons the lowest MPG he ever sees is 25 - as opposed to 15 in his previous 530 auto petrol. (That's London rush hour commuting)
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Until perhaps five years ago, diesel was substantially cheaper than gasoline. However, with the most recent gas crisis, the diesel prices went up faster and stayed that way. They seem stuck there right now.
I rather like diesels, and the fuel isn't THAT hard to find. Part of the issue is also that during the gas crisis in the seventies, GM attempted to make some diesel engines using existing gasoline block designs. They were ghastly and unreliable and left a bad taste in the public's mind regarding diesel engines. --scott
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On Aug 24, 2:12 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

American's love diesel, look at the premiums that the big 3 were getting for diesel engine options in their pick-ups.
The fuel monopoly does not like diesel because the fuel monopoly does not like 50 mpg or better in a consumer vehicle. How else do you explain the high diesel pump pricing combined with the low cetane US diesel? It defies open market theory as diesel should be cheaper because there is more of it made and it is less epensive to make than gasoline
If BMW do have problems with a 4 it's because the market in the US for BMW is generally composed of people who could care less about the cost of gas. Most of the top 10% don't drive or if they drive BMW have their gas paid for by their stock holders.
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On Wed, 26 Aug 2009 13:45:47 -0700 (PDT), Thundercleets

Americans *what* loves diesel?
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Re relative price of diesel, my understanding is that it is a smaller fraction of petroleum than petrol.
Thus, as far as Europe is concerned anyway, which has seen massive rises in diesel consumption relative to petrol, diesel could be seen as a (cheap) byproduct of petrol production, since (that part of the) the fractionation process was in essence paid for by petrol sales.
However, as diesel consumption rose to beyond the 'natural' petrol/diesel fractionation ratio the fractionation process was run to produce more diesel, so the marginal cost of diesel rose substantially.
DAS
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