Brakes too good.

Page 1 of 3  
Just aquired an E39 to replace my E34. One difference that is immediately apparent, is the lightness of the brakes. So little pressure is required to brake, that unless I brace myself with my
left foot, I slide forward in the seat. This, for just normal slowing down braking. Not hard braking. Is this normal for an E39? The brakes are fine orherwise. Quite progressive and smooth, with no pulling. I'm not worried about, but the handbrake doesn't seen too good either, but that might be because it's an auto and hasn't been used enough to keep the drums and linkage in good condition. Mike.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

I have had 2 E39s and the handbrake on my first one was very poor. Didn't seem to be anything that could be done to improve its performance.
--

jeremy
['01 BMW 530iA SE Touring]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You are not required to mash the pedals to the floor. It's okay to lightly push them.
The hand brake is intended to keep a stationary car it rest, it is not intended to bring a moving car to a halt. Yes, it can do that when called upon, but that is not its job, and its failure to do that as well as the main brakes should not be considered a fault. For one thing, the brake pads for the parking brake have less than half of the mechanical advantage as the main brakes -- they are considerably smaller in surface area, and they haven't the force (leverage) aplied that the main brakes have. For another thing, they call it a Parking Brake for a reason.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I did say for normal slowing down in my post. IOW when lightly braking, the pressure required on the pedal is not enough to hold me in the seat.

I do know what a handbrake or parking brake should be capable of. My drive has a slight slope. Unless I really heave on it, the car will still roll. My wife would never be able to pull it on enough. Mike.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It can be adjusted. The spec on my 3 series is that the brake should engagek on the 4th click of the ratchet mechanism. The adjustment is a bit tedious to accomplish because the left and right side are adjusted independently of each other. One can be adjusted properly, and the other one still be too loose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That only adjusts the lever position, and whilst an adjustment may achieve a slightly better machanical advantage. It will not turn a poor handbrake into a good one. The problem with mine is undoubtedly in the hubs, or maybe stiffness in the linkage etc, but as I said. I'm not worried about it. I've no doubt I can easily improve them to an acceptable level. Mike.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's true, if only one brake is working. Having said that, two working brakes is not twice as good as one. Two working brakes are better than one marginal brake though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

effectiveness. I would periodically (now and again) engage the handbrake whilst driving (slowly and for a few seconds only) - I think someone sujggested that it might rought things up (though I'd have thought smooth things down!) and it may have made a minor improvement. But on the whole I would describe it as woeful (on that 1997 model).
My previous comments on this matter:
http://groups.google.co.uk/group/alt.autos.bmw/browse_frm/thread/3d93181 a13ccf93a/acf0f58d023f5d36?lnk=st&q=jeremy+523i+brake&rnum=1 #acf0f58d023f5d36
--

jeremy
['01 BMW 530iA SE Touring]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike G wrote:

You are not supposed to hold yourself in your seat with foot pressure on the brakes. Are you wearing teflon pants or something?
--
-Fred W

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of course you are. Otherwise how would you stop yourself sliding forward in the seat under heavy braking. It should be relative. Light or heavy braking should need enough pressure on the pedal to avoid sliding forwards. I'm not a newbie to driving. I've been driving for decades. I think I know by now what is acceptable as far as a foot brake is concerned, and as it stands, the foot brake on my car is too sensitive. My quesstion was, whether that is normal for the E39. Mike.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike G wrote:

By either using the 'dead pedal' to brace with your other foot or by depending on your seat/shoulder belt to hold you in place. Using the brake pedal to keep yourself from sliding forward in the seat is ludicrous. It sounds as if you have your seat bottom cushion tilted forward.

In which case I suppose I'm glad we're separated by an ocean.

Then put the heel of your brake foot on the floor and use it for leverage and to modulate the pressure. -- C.R. Krieger
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Shouldn't be necessary. For comfort it's far better that the pressure exerted on the pedal is more or less the same as the pressure required to hold you in the seat. Of course the other foot is used as well, but it should not be needed for just light slowing down down braking.
Using the

Do you think that I don't know how to adjust a seat?

Make all the snide comments you like, but you have no idea of whether I'm good or bad driver. My insurance Co thinks I'm good enough for maximum NCB though, after 16 years of claim and conviction free motoring.

Don't be ridiculous. If the ball of your foot is on the pedal, unless you have enormous feet, your heel will be off the floor. Mike.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My heel is on the floor while I work the brake pedal.
I completely do not get what your problem is, unless you have the back of the seat higher than the front, and you slide downhill while stopping.
Maybe the seats are too slippery from the crap they smear on them at the Detail Shop.
Use the foot rest under your left foot to hold you back against the seat while you brake. Whatever the problem is, it isn't the brakes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

None of the above applies.

You obviously don't believe there is an optimum for brake pedal pressure. That brakes can be too light or too heavy for comfort. In which case I understand your inability to understand what I mean when I say I believe the brakes are too light for comfort. Mike.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

FWIW I didn't notice any difference in pedal pressure when changing from my E34 525 auto. I'd call the brakes on my E39 'perfectly weighted' ;-)
--
*Can fat people go skinny-dipping?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You seem to be the only one who knows what I'm on about. :-) I noticed yesterday when swapping the wheels, that all the discs could do with being replaced. Not very badly worn, but a little too much lipping for me. Maybe once they are replaced with new pads all round, the brakes will feel better, and maybe.I can improve the h/brake at the same time. Mike.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike G wrote:

Getting to the main point above, what are you using for pads and rotors? I have found that there can be a great deal of variation depending on what kind of rotors and pads are installed. Some tend to be much grabbier than others...
--
-Fred W

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike G wrote:

Do you want comfort or effective braking? Wait; let me guess ... you have an automatic, don't you?

Then there should be no problem. Get it out from under your right knee and put it where it should be.

It is not outside the realm of possibility. As a BMW club driving instructor, I see some truly ridiculous seating positions.

It's not snide. That implies malice. I intend no malice. That makes it glib.

Insurance companies have no clue whether you're a good driver. They only know whether you've hit anything lately - or reported what you did hit to them. There are some stunningly bad drivers who have managed to avoid such incidents. [Apparently, there is a God.] During most of the 16 years to which you refer, I've been teaching others how to drive at high speeds as well as in competition. I resolve problems like yours all the time. Of course, you need to get over blaming it all on the car and accept that your technique might need some changing.

If you are trying to modulate an overboosted brake with light pressure, you don't want to use the ball of your foot. You want to use the toe - with your heel braced on the floor. -- C.R. Krieger (Been there; done that)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you want comfort or effective braking? Wait; let me guess ... you have an automatic, don't you?
What has being an automatic got to do with whether or not I'm comfortable with the braking. I've also got a Celica GT4 turbo, or Alltrack as they call them in the US. The weighting on it's brakes is just about right compared to the E39, but if you refer to my OP you might notice I wrote that apart from the lightness of them, the brakes were fine.

Then there should be no problem. Get it out from under your right knee and put it where it should be.
Again. Read my OP.

It is not outside the realm of possibility. As a BMW club driving instructor, I see some truly ridiculous seating positions.

It's not snide. That implies malice. I intend no malice. That makes it glib.
I suggest you look up the meaning of snide. Insinuating, or slyly derogatory. Your comment qualifies on both counts.

Insurance companies have no clue whether you're a good driver. They only know whether you've hit anything lately - or reported what you did hit to them. There are some stunningly bad drivers who have managed to avoid such incidents.
Agreed. But my point remains. You're making an assumption based on no evidence whatsover of my competence on the road. I have no problem with driving the car. Look again at my OP.
[Apparently, there is a God.] During most of the 16 years to which you refer, I've been teaching others how to drive at high speeds as well as in competition. I resolve problems like yours all the time. Of course, you need to get over blaming it all on the car and accept that your technique might need some changing.
That comment is patronising to say the least. My problem as you put it, does not interfere with my ability to drive the car. If I think the brakes are too light, that is an opinion. They are light compared to other cars I've owned or driven, and lighter than I'd prefer. How can anyone dispute someones personal preferences? They might have a different opinion, but does that mean it's better? As far as the individual is concerned?
I would suggest that all drivers have what they consider to be ideal weighting for brakes and steering. Steering feel, feedback etc. In that respect I'm no different to anyone else.
If you are trying to modulate an overboosted brake with light pressure, you don't want to use the ball of your foot. You want to use the toe - with your heel braced on the floor.
All this started with a simple question, basically just asking if a light brake was normal for an E39. So far no one has answered it. Instead I have had replies telling me to use my left foot, which I do anyway, whatever car I'm driving, and others inferring I don't know how to adjust the seat, or drive properly. Mike.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Instead of bitching back and forth here, Change your disks and pads for some HIGH quality OEM or similar equipment AND FLUSH the system properly..... it could be old fluid that is half cooked, has air or whatever...
I agree with E28Guy, small changes to your position of seat or feet could also be the issue... he has the proper experience to offer advice... I would listen.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.