E36 jack pads (under the sill)

My touring has lost a few of the rubber jack support pads that live under the sill. I remember old e36 coupe did the same years ago. They're about 2-3" in diamter.
I'm not overly bothered except for the idea that it's left a hole that all the nasty winter salt can get into. Do these things just push fit?
If I go and buy replacements are they just going to fall back out in a few months? Has anyone come up with a good solution to this problem?
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I have to replaced mine 3 years ago on my e39 because they fell by themselves. When I re installed the new ones, I put a bead of silicone all around the pad (where they touch the receptacle) before pushing them in place. Do not plugged those hole completlely, on some model those pad receptacle are used to hide the ouput drain line of the sunroof.
Sylvain

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syl. wrote:

The latest versions of the E39 pads have an expanding rivet in the center that holds it in. Much better than the earlier versions. On the E36 - some silicone adhesive will work just fine.
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Those "pads" actually hide the tie down points that the tow truck driver needs to carry your car on a flat bed truck.
John G.Burns B.Eng, Bonny Scotland

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What's wrong with the traditional way - lashing round the wheels?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

That works too. But there are tie downs on the body, and they hide under the "jack pads."
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Jeff Strickland wrote:

Yeah, it works (lashing the wheels), but it is not the preferred way to lash a car down on a flatbed towtruck.
The suspension was designed for holding a car up off the ground, not for holding it down. When you secure the wheels to a flatbed and bounce on down the road, the full weight of the car will be yanking upwards and sideways on suspension components that were not designed for that kind of load.
The preferred method is to fasten the chassis to the flatbed directly via cinch straps that are arranged at an acute angle to the bed. This allows the suspension to flex somewhat normally while holding the car in position on the truck.
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