E36 needs new brake pads . . .

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:


Top be honest, I have done it manually too, pushing the caliper against the disk (rotor) after removing the guide pins, but only when in a pinch. I had a brake pad fail on my tow vehicle (Ford Exploder) this past summer up while up in Northern Maine and had to change them in the gravel driveway of the camp we were staying at. The broken pad friction material was dragging on the rotors and causing them to heat up. I had a few tools in the truck but hadn't taken my big C-clamp since... well, it is big, and heavy.
But when doing the job in my garage at home I find that a c-clamp ensures the piston get pressed back evenly and in a controlled fashion.
--
-Fred W

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Dean Dark wrote:

Nah, go abscond the turkey baster from SWMBO. Tell he you have no idea what happened to it but she is free to go out and buy a new one.
--
-Fred W

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On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 15:55:58 -0400, Fred W

You can only do that once, and I already did. I hid it somewhere but I never could find the damned thing again.
--
Dan.

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Other thing is one of those pump spray kitchen cleaners, etc. Rinse well before use. Just put the intake pipe in the reservoir and pump into a container.
--
*If you ate pasta and anti-pasta, would you still be hungry?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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I personally had never thought about openning the bleed nipple, and on the face of it, it seems a good idea, however, personally, I would still push the fluid back to the reservoir, but I would do it one caliper at a time, and then pump the brake up. Whilst doing it, I would also open the reservoir and put an absorbant rag over the top. You could also take some fluid out with a medical syringe, which are quite cheap on EBay, then put it back in afterwards (but again, I would be interfering with the equilibrium of the system, the yin and yang - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yin_and_yang )!
The reasons I would still push the fluid back are:
1. I dont believe I could damage the system 2. I do not want to open a closed system and lose fluid which I will probably want to replace 3. I probably wont have topped the fluid up throughout the duration of the pads life, the reservoir quantity is such that it can accommodate both new and old pads 4. I like to avoid fluid mess
Saying this, both methods work, and the bottom line is whatever makes you feel most comfortable.
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Or just use any old piece of pipe - dip it in, thumb over the end withdraw the pipe to an alternative container take thumb off and repeat.
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I actually have an old 50cc syringe (minus the hypodermic needle) that I keep in the garage for sucking out the old brake fluid. Works a charm...
--
-Fred W

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