E36 Service Reset Tool

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Can anyone tell me how to reset the service lights (oil service and inspection) using i.e. Draper service reset tool. Thanks.

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Ignition off.
Plug in tool firmly but carefully, set the switches to on / oil.
Ignition on, after 5-10s you get 5 green lights.
Ignition off, carefully remove too :-)
To reset inspection move the oil/insp switch and repeat above. You may need to wait longer than 10s.
--
Who needs a life when you've got Unix? :-)
Email: snipped-for-privacy@unixnerd.demon.co.uk, John G.Burns B.Eng, Bonny Scotland
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Thank you all for your help. Merry Christmas!!
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On my 1995 E36, you can ground pin 7 from the diagnostic connector with a wire. Turn on the ignition, wait 5 seconds for oil reset, or about 20 for service reset. Then turn off, disconnect wire, and you should be ready to go. No need for a tool.
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is there any chance to couse some damage to ECU?

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SkF wrote:

Of course. If you ground the wrong pin, well... it's an expensive mistake.
On the other hand, $150 for a tool to short two pins together is an expensive thing too.
Ya pays ya money, or ya takes ya chances...
--
-Fred W

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In the UK the tool is only 10 GBP / $17. There must be cheaper tools in the US, on ebay meybe?
--
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Email: snipped-for-privacy@unixnerd.demon.co.uk, John G.Burns B.Eng, Bonny Scotland
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John Burns wrote:

Yes there are cheaper, but I was referring to the Peake Research tool specifically.
http://www.peakeresearch.com /
--
-Fred W

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Doesn't that provide additional diagostic information for the user though?
--

jeremy


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Jeremy wrote:

Some of them do. Others just do the reset.
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-Fred W

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For $150, you get a code reader too. Rather a different tool.
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*I wish the buck stopped here. I could use a few.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

The coder reader ain't that accurate though. I've used one of these Peake tools for years.
-- Cliff .
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Huh? Can you explain this a bit? It's a digital code set by the DME - how can the code reader have any "accuracy" issue - either the code is there or it's not.
My Peake tool sure seems to work just fine - was quite handy when wife accidentally failed to tighten the gas cap properly, once. I was quite worried as the Check Engine Light came on (totally forgot that it could be set by loose cap - so thought I might have a major problem) went home and slapped on the Peake tool, showed code for major evap leak and I promptly made the connection. Reset CEL, tightened gas cap, and voila - no more problem.
Frank
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Raybender wrote:

Sure. Here's an example: I am currently getting a fault (with lit C.E. light) which tells me that the secondary air flow is too low in cylinders 4-6. The professional machine at my BMW repair shop says *minor leak detected*. Not really the same thing....see what I mean? These little tools are great for the DIYer, for resetting c.e. faults and oil and service countdown lights, but I wouldn't put too much stock in their diagnosing capabilities.

Well goody for you.
-- Cliff
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They don't diagnose anything. The engine ECU does that and issues a code. The code reader not surprisingly just reads that code. But the same sequence of digits doesn't necessarily mean the same for all models - hence the need for the conversion charts.
--
*One nice thing about egotists: they don't talk about other people.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Well, ok. From what you said it would seem that the Peake tool is actually better. It's telling you *specifically* that the secondary air pump is not feeding air to cylinders 4-6 properly during startup. *Minor leak detected* means what? where? what system?
It apparently is not uncommon for the secondary air pump and/or its vacuum valve to fail from condensation, so unless you think there is an error in the Peake code sheet, I'd pull the vacuum valve and look for crud in the system.
Again, the Peake tool only reads codes from the DME, any issue about the code being too vague or whatnot would seem to be the fault of the programmer for the DME.
Frank
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Raybender wrote:

Your reasoning makes sense, but......but in my case, it just so happens that the seconary air pump, and valve, are still new, and clearly work just fine. The original pump on the car clearly crapped out (was making a racket and then stopped working) and had to be replaced.

I agree, it's a little vague. They can't find the leak (not without an extensive search that I don't want to pay for right now), but sometimes I seem to get the faint whiff of gasoline when idling with the door open. I'm waiting for it to get worse so as to detect it easier. -- Cliff
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More likely the conversion chart you have is wrong.

It's worked fine for me on the couple of times I've needed it - even although UK cars aren't really on the conversion chart. Indeed, it's more than saved its cost.
--
*Can fat people go skinny-dipping?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Yep, that possibility occurred to me, but it's the chart that came with the tool. Anyway, the tech at the shop doesn't put a whole lot of trust in them.
-- Cliff
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Naturally. Why do you suppose that he might prefer you to pay him to diagnose the codes?
--
-Fred W

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