gas prices (kinda OT)

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i don't understand:(

in poland, very easy, on every street. germany, it's more difficult but possible. holland-no problem, france- possible, lithuania- no problem. Anax
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there are stations for it, but not that much of 'em. something like the avg. about 3 per city.
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but which country? in poland we have 3 on one street:) every petrol station has also lpg Anax
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croatia, i wrote somewhere before
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At a $1.50 per liter, that works out to nearly $6.00 per gallon. Most of that is road tax though, and we pay our road taxes differently than you do. Our -- USA -- gas is about $2.50 per gallon in California.

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Jeff Strickland wrote:

Well, in addition to paying $1.00 for a liter of diesel (ie $3.80 a gallon), I pay $100 a month in road tax. (Diesel costs less at the pump, but private vehicles are taxed more.)
What's the road tax in California?
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something interesting... old, but interesting. http://www.engadget.com/entry/1234000707020792 /
Ahh, here we go. http://www.energy.ca.gov/gasoline/statistics/gas_taxes_by_state_2002.html This would explain why so many roads here are in such poor condition. (according to this site http://www.transportationca.com/recent_news/hidden_tax.shtml )
Another interesting link.. a little old, and rather idealistic, but entertaining. http://www.wematter.com/cagastax /
To answer your question. I think its just a little over 50 cents a gallon. Or less then 25% of what most other countries charge for tax on it.
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It comes from several sources, income taxes and property tax that make it to the General Fund are the primary sources. Then, we have sales tax that when generated from gasoline sales gets sent to the road department. We have sales tax on lots of stuff, generally non-food items, but not always. Anyway, the sales tax is different in different counties -- I suppose a township would be an equivelent level of government -- but it hovers right around 8% statewide. When the sales tax is derived from fuel sales, then those tax dollars go to transportation projects.
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It doesn't seem then that you have a flat rate "road tax" as they do here (next to all the other sundry taxes, such as property, sales, income, etc....) By this I mean, you pay road tax for every vehicle you own, every month, regardless of whether you actually drive it. You can keep your beautiful convertible garaged for nine months a year and only drive it three, but you still pay twelve months of road tax.
The only way to avoid paying the tax for a car that you never drive, is to hand back your registration. But then you won't be able to drive it that one time a year when the weather is fine.
This is, of course, preposterous, but it helps keep the number of cars down -- I, for one, do not keep a second vehicle (say a beautiful 1988 Saab 900 for recreational driving on weekends), exactly because of the flat rate road tax.
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Well, not exactly. We don't pay a road tax, specifically -- with the exception of the sales tax of 8 cents on the dollar of fuel purchases. All of the other road funding comes from the state general fund and from federal income tax dollars that manage to drift back down the funding pipeline. It doesn't matter that one owns 1 car or 5, he pays the same in taxes. The obvious exception would be that the guy that owns 5 cars has a higher income - arguably - and therefore pays more income tax. But assuming equal income, everybody pays the same tax except that high mileage drivers will buy more gas and therefore the sales tax they pay will be a greater dollar amount. If a car gets filled with gas, then is parked for 9 months or gets used everyday, it pays the same in taxes for that particular fill up.
In any event, we pay considerably less fuel tax than Europeans pay, this is why we have Suburbans and Hummers trolling the highways, and you guys find a way to make due with Geo Metros and other micro minis that Americans do not seem to tolerate very well. The argument has long been that if we paid the same fuel taxes that you pay, we would change the way we drive.
I drive a 3 Series as a daily driver, my wife gets by nicely with a Mazda minivan, my daughter has a Toyota truck, and we keep a Jeep in the side yard for weekend driving. As you can see, I keep several cars around and don't worry much about paying road taxes.
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In western Europe at least we all pay a tax that allows us to put the car on the road. The annual sum and way of calculating it varies substantially across the countries. In Britain we display a tax disc on the windscreen as evidence that we have paid.
In Britain this tax and those on fuel were raised initially to pay for roads, but the link was broken decades ago and, of course, revenues far exceed the expensiture on roads.
Peter Bozz's comment about paying for a car off the road for a long period do not necessarily apply across the board as in the UK we can deregister a car if it is kept on private ground. And did I not hear about seasonal registration in Germany?
DAS
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in Poland we all hae it in fuel price. normally 1 Liter of fuel in production costs about 15Ecents, on gas station- 1 Euro. So 85 Ecents are taxes

it's not possible in poland:( actually you do not pay road tax but you have to pay car insurance no matter if you use your car or not. only old cars (more then 40 years) can have insurance not for whole year but just for part of it for exemple 1 month. I've also VW T2 westfalia camper (30 years old) which I use only for holidays but I have to pay insurance for whole year:(((
Anax
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Subsuming the current road tax ("vehicle excise duty" in its present guise) into the fuel duties keeps getting raised as a discussion point in the UK. There are people who advocate this.
We pay more than EUR 1 per litre excluding the road tax.
However, wages in Poland are lower, so the price there is probably higher, pro rata, i.e. the effect on the pocket is greater.
DAS
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Dori A Schmetterling wrote:

In the Netherlands, you *can* deregister a car if you don't keep it on the public road. But then you literally have to hand in your license plates -- Taxman is pretty tough that way. (We don't have tax discs or other visual markings indicating we've actually paid the due taxes.) So it's kind of a hassle. I haven't heard of seasonal registration here. Only cars older than 25 years are exempt from the road tax. So you can keep a 1979 convertible (or older) for "free".

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[snip]
Logic dictates that, yes, you will. Chances are you'd be less likely to buy a Suburban than a Japanese minivan. That will keep the gasoline demand down a bit. But hey, it's your money. If you want to keep giving bundles of it to the Middle East, Venezuela and other place that the average American (and European) can't even find on the map, that's your prerogative. I hear the Burj Al Arab Hotel is a very expensive piece of architecture.

If you kept these cars in Holland, they would set you back at least $300+ a month (rough guestimation: the road tax on a diesel powered Land Cruiser alone is about $150 a month).
And that's before you even drove a single mile with any of them.
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Geez, I hope you guys don't churn this into yet another reason to hate Americans.
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[snip]

By "this" do you mean the fact that you pay a lot less taxes on cars and fuel in the States? If so, then I believe the appropriate term here would be "jealousy"....
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A reasonable man would be jealous, a zealot would have fire in his eyes. Yet another reason to hate Americans. ;-)
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And I thought the right word would be "envy".... :-)
DAS
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Dori A Schmetterling wrote:

It's just that "envy" implies that I want to be like 'em. Which I don't really (no offense meant; I just like being European).
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