How does a BMW car radio tune to GPS FM transmitter frequency?

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And sadly, now you can't order them WITHOUT oodles of crappy electronic accessories. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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In

I think that the 300 series was the beginning of the end of BMWs as "pure" driver's cars.
I suppose the sign that they were finished with that market was when they dropped the "Ultimate Driving Machine" slogan.
--
Bert Hyman St. Paul, MN snipped-for-privacy@iphouse.com

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It tunes like the radio used in any other modern car. You can use either a signal seeking scan to the nearest strong station or tune manually with fixed increments between channels on LW, MW and FM.
There are no modern automobile receivers with analog tuning that I'm aware of so you are stuck with fixed increments like 9 or 10khz on MW, etc.

Set the tuner to manual then advance one channel at a time to a relatively empty one. The owners manual for the radio should have all this.
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On Thu, 06 Sep 2007 07:20:02 -0700, John S. wrote:

Sigh. My "m" doesn't work then. There is no way, no matter WHICH buttons I press, to get to an unused station on my BMW radio. I guess it's broke.
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By pressing M that should disable the scan feature. Pressing the arrow button one should move the frequency display one increment only, i.e. 970 to 980 but that is all. You have to push it each time to move the display ahead one increment. It won't automatically tune to an empty frequency or channel.
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Just let the garmin transmit first. At this point the signal should indicate to your radio not to skip this location since there is a signal.
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Is this an AMERICAN RADIO or a radio in an American car?
Is thin in America?
If so you will find that the digital or vari-cap tuners or rather stations in the US will be 9Khz apart and the Euro stations are 10Khz. This makes preset and seek tuning difficult so they make the auto-tune radios for different markets similar to cell phones.
If your tuner jumps 9Khz then you are NEVER going to get 100.1. However if you friends old style radio has the twiddly know device fixed to a manually turned variable capacitor to tune the stations then he can dial in whatever the range obtainable from lowest to highest and everything in between.
Just coz its new don't mean it better.
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Sir Hugh of Bognor

The difference between men and boys is the price of their toys.
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snipped-for-privacy@h-gee.co.uk () wrote in

US FM broadcast channels are 200kHz apart.
US AM broadcast channels are 10kHz apart.
--
Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN | snipped-for-privacy@iphouse.com

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European MW (AM) uses 9 kHz spacing and most European FM tuners use 50kHz FM steps, or even 25kHz.
One car stereo I had could be user configured for either US or European channel assignment.
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On Sep 6, 1:22 pm, snipped-for-privacy@h-gee.co.uk wrote:

Most old car radios i fooled with tuned the coils instead of the capacitors. The tuning mechanism moved ferrite slugs in and out of the coils, while the caps were fixed. Less hassles with failures from dust that way.

If it's new it's built more cheaply. The old radios were full of moving parts assembled by hand and components soldered together by hand. lots of labour. When digital electronics came up with synthesized tuning, it al came down to a few microchips installed on a board, and a few switches, often soldered to the same board, and all of it done by robotic machinery. The insides of those chips and the displays are all made using photographic techniques. The whole thing is probably assembled without anyone touching it. Translates into inexpensive, but because it looks hi-tech they can charge more for it. If they were to go back to building the old radios, we couldn't afford them. Some of those old car radios would pull in stations from terrific distances. The new ones I've had get faint as soon as I get out of sight of the station.
Dan
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Some car radios has local/ "DX" button. If you scan in local mode you don't get the weak stations like the Garmin FM transmitter.
.......... Per.
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Marian, someone had your solution about 20 posts back:
1. Put the transmitter on the desired channel, and place it near the antenna so the radio will find the new channel.
2. Use the scan feature that your radio seems to be stuck on, and let the radio find the transmitter.
3. Once you find a frequency that is clear and usable, lock it in as a preset on the radio.
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