Is it just BMW that does not recommend tire rotation?

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Do any other manufacturers other than BMW not recommend tire rotation?

Tire rotation The tread wear patterns at the front end differ from those at the rear - the actual patterns will vary according to individual driving conditions. In the interests of safety and maintaining optimal handling characteristics, BMW does not recommend tire rotation.
If a proposed interaxle rotation of tires is based on economic considerations, one should consider whether the costs for the rotation are likely to be recaptured by any increase in the service life of the tires that might be realized. In principle, interaxle rotation must be performed in short intervals, with a maximum of 3,000 miles (5,000 km). Consult your BMW center for more information.
Should you decide to rotate the tires, it is essential to comply with the following: Rotate tires on the same side only, since braking characteristics and road grip could otherwise be adversely affected. Following rotation, the tire inflation pressure should always be corrected. If different tire sizes are mounted on the front and rear axles (refer to page 130), the wheels may not be rotated from one axle to the other.
http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?tU120 http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t6893 http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?ti037
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Shaft Drive wrote:

The info you provided sounds like they might be referring to purpose-built front and rear tires of the same size. Some high-end BMWs have larger tires on the rear axle.
Pirelli's PZero system includes a directional tire for the front, and an asymmetric tire for the rear. I believe they're optimized for RWD cars.
<http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Pirelli&tireModel=PZero+System+Direzionale
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The info is the same in virtually all BMW owner manuals, for all tire combinations including same-size front/rear. For instance, my '01 330xi (same size all round - has to be!) recommends against it. So does the manual for my '91 E34 525i.
The front tires tend to wear asymmetrically; more wear on the outside/outboard edges than in the center and inside edge. This happens *even if* the car is perfectly aligned.
Floyd
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Some tyre can only rotate in one direction, so these can't be turned around on the rim and could only be swapped between the front and back on the same side and then only if the tyres are the same size (otherwise you will go round in circles!). So you may not be able to swap any tyres on some models / wheels.
Generally speaking rear tyres tend to wear in the middle, especially if you do a lot of motorway work whereas the fronts tend to wear at the edge (especially outside - so some tyres can be turned or rim swapped to even this wear up). As it happens all my 7 series have had standard tyres which are all the same size, so when the fronts wear down, I move the rears to the front and put new tyres on the rear.
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Shaft Drive wrote:

Well, I can think of several cars right off the top of my head (Dodge Viper, for one) where there is a different configuration tire for each corner of the car, and so rotation isn't even possible. ANY car that uses unidirectional tires AND different size tires front and rear falls into that category.
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Steve wrote:

Vettes - 97 & up - different size wheels on the front and back. tires are directional, so rotating isn't possible without dismounting the tires. Don't own one, so can't tell you what the manual says, but if I owned one I wouldn't rotate the tires.
Some 80's Camaros had wheels with different offset for front and rear with directional tires, so same problem.
For my 01 Trans Am it recommends rotating front-rear on the same side.
I think the Acura NSX had a unique tire at each corner as well.
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SNIP
Forgive my ignorance but, in using the word 'unique' are saying that each tire is actually manufactured differently? And if so, how does one replace a single tire? Do you request a left rear, front right, etc...?
RichieP
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That is exactly the case. The NSX (and many other high performance cars, including BMW's with different-sized front/rear sport packages) have uni-directional tires. That means that the tires can be on only one side (left/right) of the car. When, in addition, the tires at the front and rear are different sizes, that means that no tire can be used *EXCEPT* at the corner it is designed for. The NSX ('91-'94) has 205/50ZR15's front, 225/50ZR16 rear (IIRC), and the OEM tires (Yoko & Bridgestones) are uni-directional.
If you trash a tire, you should replace both on that axle if they have been worn much - say about 75% left. You do have to order the right one for that corner.
FloydR - used to have an NSX
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Come on people, you can't be serious. Uni-directional tires can be used on either side of the car. You don't request a left or a right. You just need to make sure you mount the tire facing the right direction.
And the BMW recommendation has nothing to do with the tires being staggered. The recommendation is the same if the front and rear tires are the same.
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I think you should *RE-READ* my post. My *ENTIRE* post, especially the part you clipped.
Floyd
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fbloogyudsr wrote:

Just because the tire is disigned for one direction of rotation doesn't mean it can't be used on right or left. For that to be the case the tire would also have to be asimetrical, inside and outside tread or internal construction would be different. I have used tires (these were autocross tires) that were asimetrical and directional and these are usually stamped with a left or right only designation, and if the front and rear were not the same size then they could not be rotated. If the tire is just directional and the front and rear were different you could rotate left to right but you would have to dismount and remount the tires inside out on the rim.
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Todd Zuercher wrote:

Correct. There are unidirectional tires. They can be used on either side. But there also are asymmetrical tires that can be only used on one side. If a car is fitted with asymmetric tires that are also staggered (wider in the rear) there is zero opportunity for tire rotation.
-Fred W
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Marcio Watanabe wrote:

packages)
only
Marcio is correct. Floyd has uncharacteristically used an imprecise term here (unidirectional) and used it somewhat incorrectly. Here's how they work:
1) A *unidirectional* tire definitely *can* be used on either side of the car so long as it's symmetrical. Once mounted, though, it should stay on that side of the car unless turned around on the wheel.
2) An *asymmetrical* tire can be used on either side so long as it's not unidirectional. These may theoretically be swapped side-for-side without dismounting.
3) An *asymmetrical unidirectional* tire can only be used on one side of the car and shouldn't be swapped side for side under any circumstances.
As long as all four tires are the same size, #1 and #2 require four identical tires. #3 would require two pairs (one pair/side) of different tires per car.
For staggered tire sizes, #1 and #2 would require two pairs (one pair/axle) and #3 would require four different tires (one/corner).
Got it? -- C.R. Krieger (Been there; done that)
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Yeah, you're right, I mis-used the terms asymmetrical and unidirectional. I plead two things: 1) we're talking "tire rotation" here. IMHO, no unidirectional tire should be rotated left-right/right-left - especially on a BMW. In any case, that would require a re-mount. 2) someone specifically mentioned the NSX, which I had experience with as an owner of a '93. If you go to tirerack, you will discover that the OEM tires (the Bridgestone RE010 is no longer available) were uni-asy and different size f/r: the Yoko A022H1 is in this category.
Floyd
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fbloogyudsr wrote:

imprecise
unidirectional.
any
If you've got enough negative camber goin' along with a cheap tire mounter on hand, it could be an economical move. OTOH, the majority of unidirectional tires are only unidirectional for reasons of water dispersion. According to the tire engineers I've queried about this, as long as there's no water involved, it really doesn't matter which direction they run, so side-to-side swaps are certainly a viable alternative if you really need to drive the car instead of worry about whether the tires are 'proper' or not.

that
And you're back in form, as ruthlessly correct as ever! Remarkably, the old A008s were also front-rear different, even in the same size. These were marked for rotational directions for FWD and RWD cars as well as being notoriously asymmetrical (slicks on the outer half!). Tire Rack would ship two pairs and the pair on the 'non-driving' end would appear to be turning backwards, according to the arrows on the sidewall. Fortunately, I never had to figure out what to do with these on an AWD car. =;^) -- C.R. Krieger (Been there; done that)
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I just wish my brain and fingers would always get together - of course sometimes my brain just goes sideways while my fingers are typing forwards...
Floyd
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I can really see this if you've been on a track going left, then next weekend on a track going right... ;-)
Floyd
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Marcio Watanabe wrote:
    [...]

My ALPINA B10 V8 has 4 different tyres - each has a direction of rotation and an outer edge, rears wider than fronts.

I'd still not rotate tyres, even if approved - false economy IMO.
A
--
Trade Oil in

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fbloogyudsr wrote:

that each

the
There are all sorts of wacky configurations. My current Pirelli PZero Nero M+S tires are non-directional asymmetric. Some tires are directional asymmetric. The wackiest of all are directional asymmetric left/right specific.
<http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake Goodrich&tireModel=g-Force+T%2FA+KD>
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Yep. Like the NSX. A different tire on each corner. It's not that bad once you get used to the idea.
--
Dan.

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