M50 clutch

Anyone replaced the clutch on an E34 M50 525i? Was it a horrible job or relatively easy? I've got a very noisy release bearing - when I press the
clutch, and now a little when I don't - that sounds like it won't last too much longer. Garage quoted £280 which isn't too bad except they'd want another £300 if the dual mass flywheel needed replacing. I don't want to get into spiralling costs so I'm inclined to do it myself for the £98 the kit will cost, and ignore the flywheel unless it looks ready to crack (in which case I've lost nothing but time). I'm concerned about removing the driveshaft because I've never done that. While everything is apart, is there a way of testing the guibo coupling if the car has one?
Another thing, what's a good adhesive to stick sunroof lining back on? It's grey cloth and it's coming off at the front.
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Dan Buchan wrote:

Dual-mass flywheel? Do many BMWs have that? Surely my 1.9 Z3 doesn't

That should be the easiest part

If it's like the old GM cars, there isn't a good solution. The foam backing to that cloth has crumbled into dust. If you introduce glue to that, you get clumps of mud.
The cheapest way to get it fixed correctly is to remove the headliner shell yourself, clean all the old stuff off, and take it to a trim shop (call first) and have them apply new fabric.
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I think it does. Early M42s didn't have it, but about 1991 they all got them. M44 always had it.
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Thanks for the fast reply.

I didn't know what one was until someone told me I might have one. The BMW dealer took the chassis number and said it did. So I looked it up, and apparently it consists of two flywheels joined by some kind of coupling so that they can rotate against each other by a certain amount, with some resistance. I don't like the sound of it. As far as I can tell, it's designed to reduce gear rattle and perhaps make for smoother shifts, but I've always found this car slightly awkward in that respect. Rev matching can be difficult perhaps because the flywheel is too heavy!

Good. I've swapped a clutch before, but on a FWD car with the engine out. Removing the driveshaft quite frankly scares me, I'm worried it will rumble after I put it back.

Yes, there is foam residue on the cloth. The surface underneath is solid though.

Car's too old with too many other faults to make it worthwhile. The front edge wraps back over the top so it perhaps could be glued there, where it wouldn't show. It stays on by itself for a while so it wouldn't take much to hold it. I don't ever glue cloth though so unsure what type of adhesive to use.
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Well, if you are determined, 3M makes a spray contact adhesive just for headliners. Most auto parts stores should have it, certainly the ones that also mix paint.
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Dan Buchan wrote:

Often the clutch plate with have the spring dampers in it but on the dual mass flywheels the flywheel has them in it instead. If the springs are week or have broken then the clutch feel can be poor.
I'd bite the garage's hand off for £280 including a full clutch kit. Some people say to also replace the spigot bearing which usually is not included in the kit. It's also a good time to check the crank and input shaft seals and also bleed the clutch.
The only difficult part of the job is access to the starter motor and the gearbox mounting bolts and generally having good access from underneath. if you can get a spanner to everything then it's doable. On my 3 series I had to remove a load of stuff including the inlet manifold to get to some of the bolts.
The driveshaft is six nuts and bolts either end and the carrier in the middle. There's no splitting greasy CVs joints or the like like on a FWD car. If that scares you then I guess you shouldn't be doing the gearbox yourself.

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Had to look that one up. Just remove the drivewhaft, and look at the coupling. Any cracks will be evident. If it's bad enough to need replacing, you will know it.
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Dan Buchan wrote:

Another option is to do away with the dual mass flywheel and get yourself a used E12/28 flywheel, have it machined and use an E28 clutch kit. Even with the cost of a used E12/28 flywheel ($75-125), this set up is cheaper, lighter (save like something like 5-7 lbs), and will produce faster revs. Its the "upgrade" kit for most E34 535i! What's not to like?
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Sounds like a good idea. Will any M20 flywheel do? I've got a spare 2L one in an E21. If my flywheel looks OK I will probably leave it though - whatever's easiest.
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Dan Buchan wrote:

Geez. Well, I have a noisy TO bearing also, so a clutch job is in my future anyway. Sounds like I need to add a flywheel to that.
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I wouldn't worry. The BMW dealer service desk said they hardly ever replaced flywheels. If something is wrong with mine I haven't noticed so I think I can carry on living with it unless it's visibly cracked. My car is 15 years and 164,000 miles. Engine is fantastic, clutch is worn out from sitting in stop-start traffic all the time! I've started getting the bus to work because it's cheaper and more relaxing.
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Dan Buchan wrote:

I'm not concerned with failure. I just don't need the added complexity and weight. My OE clutch will likely last for years, so I'll just keep an eye out for a good used flywheel and try to talk the Perfection rep out of a clutch kit.
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bfd wrote:

So what conventional flywheel would be an appropriate replacement for a M44 engine? Are these flywheels the type that include engine balance counterweights?
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M40. But you need slightly more. I think you'd need an M40 clutch too. You can make an M20 fit but you need an E21 323i throw out bearing.
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test

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I had that motor in a 3 series, and paid for clutch work at 205,000 miles -- my throw out bearing was making noise like yours is -- and the cost for pressure plate, throw out bearing, and pilot bearing was something in the neighborhood of $300 for the parts kit, and the total repair bill was just under $900 (USD).
On the 3s, the exhaust system has to come off, then a heat shield, then the drive shaft -- a good time to look closely at the center bearing -- then the transmission. I like to do my own work on my cars, but I'm glad to pay for a clutch job.

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Jeff Strickland wrote:

..and if you go by the manuals the first step is to remove one of the windscreen wipers...
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Well, that's torn it. Last time I tried to get my wiper off it was seized on. I'd decided to tackle the infamous loose wiper rubbing the paint off the bonnet problem, but when it wouldn't come off I went back inside and forgot about it.
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Dan Buchan wrote:

If you cannot change a wiper arm, then take your clutch job to a shop. If $900 payout is painful to you, and hard, greasy work is not, then change it yourself. Doesn't look to be any worse than any other clutch job.
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