Root cause insight into the common BMW blower motor resistor failures

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You could call it a sort of wind tunnel. Now obsolete, in great part due to computer modelling making analysis tools like that less important, and in great part due to computer modelling of the tools making it possible to make less turbulent tunnels. --scott
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so there was an 80 year old giant windtunnel somewhere?
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On 3/29/2013 12:18 PM, Cydrome Leader wrote:

You're joking, right?
1901: http://airandspace.si.edu/wrightbrothers/fly/1901/wind.cfm
very modern 1935:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gqAyEwCmcA

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even elevators lasting 80 years is pushing it for keeping old stuff around.
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On 03/29/2013 01:18 PM, Cydrome Leader wrote:

well, 80 years ago would be 1933; definitely into the era of commercial flight, so it's entirely possible. Hell, the Germans might have been working on jet engines by that point, or at least thinking about them.
nate
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Cydrome Leader wrote:

Just to blow a lot of HOT AIR around, and it seems to work!
Jamie
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Jamie wrote:

You're the resident hot air expert, Maynard Philbrick.
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These are kind of sloppy jobs. But it's clear there are two TO-3 devices there which have been removed in all of those photos.

Well, has anyone got docs on that mystery IC there? It's from Elmos Semiconductor, but it's not a standard Elmos part number on it, so it's almost certainly a custom, since it doesn't look like anything in their standard book. --scott
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"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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On Thu, 21 Mar 2013 15:16:46 -0400, Scott Dorsey wrote:

I don't know what a "TO-3" device is, but nobody removed anything in those photos other than the goop that covered the circuit board.

Focusing just on that Elmos Semiconductor AG IC from this thread: http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t09399 It looks like the PN is ELMOS, 10901D, 667A 1302A
It might be a generic or a special chip; I can't find it on the web: http://www.elmos.com/produkte/automotive/motor-control/dc-motor-ics.html
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All the standard Elmos part numbers begin with an E.
My guess is that the number on the chip is 10901D and that the other two numbers are date and batch codes. --scott
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On Mar 21, 10:25 pm, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

If you google for 10901D it comes back with hits to Chinese chip brokers that show it as an Elmos 16 pin surface mount chip. Which is consistent with what's in the picture of the failed module, it has 16 pins. But I could not find any data sheet on the part either.
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On Fri, 22 Mar 2013 05:20:37 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I found the same. The chip is listed here: http://www.jotrin.com/product/parts/10901D
But there is no datasheet there.
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On Fri, 22 Mar 2013 05:20:37 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I found a Russian language description of it here: http://tinyurl.com/crg2sms http://kazus.ru/schematics/electrical-engineering/search/go/?text=%D0%C5%C3%D3%CB%DF%D2%CE%D0%20ELMOS%2010901D&nohistory=1&h=1
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On Fri, 22 Mar 2013 12:31:09 +0000, Bimmer Owner wrote:

Here is a google translation
REGULATOR ELMOS 10901D Car Voltage Regulator Category: Car Source: Radioland country Electronics Temperature controller cabin air KAMAZ
Source: Plans radiokonstruktsy Simple Temperature compensated voltage regulator. Controller together with thyristor-transistor electronic ignition unit with a long spark, ensuring the rapid start-ups at various operating conditions, allowed to increase battery life of up to nine years.
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Regulator for automotive windshield
Source: MASTER KIT The controller measures the wiper-this control is designed to use regular mode switch blades and is contactless.
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Temperature compensated voltage regulator device in some ways superior designs. The controller can be used as a universal device is suitable not only for mounting on any car, but everywhere, where the generator rotor speed is variable (eg, wind power). Choose the appropriate control elements, it can be easily adapted to work with any voltage (up to 400V) and excitation current (tens of amperes).
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Voltage regulator 2012.3702, 22.3702, 221.3702
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Voltage regulator 201.3702
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Voltage Regulator 13.3702
Source: For the life of a soldering iron ... Voltage regulator RR132A, 1112.3702
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On 03/22/2013 05:34 AM, Bimmer Owner wrote:

you don't need to know this stuff any more than you need to know the gas excitation voltage in a broken fluorescent tube. because you're not going to unpot the thing and replace the chip. because it's probably not the chip in the first place.
not trying to be rude - just trying to get you focused on the relevant stuff - that the two options are:
1. continue replacing the existing [under-rated, low tech] unit. 2. build and deploy a pwm unit instead.
#1 is really not /that/ expensive, particularly if you factor in time, even if it is part of the bmw marketing susceptibility tax.
#2 is a much better time investment - it certainly has a much better return than figuring out that the existing unit is not repairable later rather than sooner.
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jim beam wrote on Fri, 22 Mar 2013 07:04:19 -0700:

I don't know how many bmws are out there, but let's say it's a million and then multiply that million by 100 dollars, and then let's see how much it is in terms of expense.
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I think it's already been suggested, but if the car were my own vehicle, I'd be content with a multi-position switch for the blower motor.. this is a very reliable method.
A heavy duty switch and some over-rated power resistors would likely outlast many replacement OEM miracle-in-a-box modules.
The parts, wire, a cover for the hole where the original removed module was, and a Saturday afternoon would likely cover the cost investment.
I'm fairly certain that there are off-the-shelf variable speed modules that would be an adequate replacement for an automotive blower motor application.
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On Fri, 22 Mar 2013 12:31:09 +0000, Bimmer Owner wrote:

Googling for the Russian text, I find they appear to have the same problem with the same FSU over here: http://www.elektroda.pl/rtvforum/viewtopic.php?p 38466#8838466
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On 03/21/2013 04:52 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

for an "engineer", you're simply not of this planet.
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On 03/21/2013 09:55 AM, jim beam wrote:

Did you have any suggestions for the OP, or did you just show up to snipe without contributing anything as per usual?
You do know that most electrical/electronic components have a maximum current rating, yes? And that electric motors tend to draw more current when the bearings are going or they are otherwise subjected to loads higher than that for which they were designed? Does any of this sound remotely familiar to you?
Really, what the will suggested seems to be a logical first step.
nate
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