Root cause insight into the common BMW blower motor resistor failures

Page 7 of 14  
On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 02:28:00 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"


Definitely not, if you already have a multimeter - but it is easier for the guys who can't figure out how to do it without butchering the wiring harness.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That type shouldn't be allowed to own any tools. They generally do more damage than good. If they do get something to work, it rarely lasts because they have no clue what because the problem.
I've seen too many vehicles that some idiot cut and patched back together. One stepvan I bought years ago had a damaged harness and I talked them down almost $1000 on the price. It was coming off lease from a fleet, and they wanted to fix it themselves. i pointed out that if they could repair it properly, it wouldn't be in that condition.
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On Sat, 23 Mar 2013 22:27:41 -0400, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

That's an idea.
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On Fri, 22 Mar 2013 15:04:39 -0400, clare wrote:

The 40 amp fuse is barely accessible (as can be seen from the photos). It's not even easy to pull the fuse & even harder to replace it. So, all I was saying was that it's actually rather difficult to insert test leads into the empty fuse #F76 fuse holder.
I'd wager it 'can' be done - it's just going to take an hour or so to get the leads in place.
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So go back to measuring at the battery terminals. Do you have or can you borrow a clamp on DC ammeter? They are great for this sort of problem. You don't even lose any skin that way.
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On Mon, 25 Mar 2013 15:51:34 +0000 (UTC), Bimmer Owner

Bet I can do it in less than half an hour - without the MaxiTester and in about 5 or 10 minutes with it.
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On Mon, 25 Mar 2013 12:26:52 -0400, clare wrote:

I'd be very happy to see pictures of the test leads in situ because I personally tried (and succeeded) in getting the 40 amp blower motor fuse F76 out and back in, but I wouldn't want to do it more than once in my life.
From memory, here's what I did: . I moved the passenger front seat as far back as I could . I lowered the passenger front seat back as far back as it goes . I removed the ignition key and disconnected the battery negative lead . I removed the panel from the bottom of the glovebox . I removed the Phillips screw and panel off to the passenger left kneecap . I lay upside down on the flattened passenger seat, head in the footwell . I located the general module III (GMIII) . With my arms bent wildly arms over my head, I disconnected harness connectors . The first enigmatic connector was the white connector X332 . The next diabolical connector was the small black X253 . And the last puzzling connector was the large black X254 . By now, I could slightly see the yellow 40 & red 50 amp fuses F76 & F77 . With a flathead 1/8" screwdriver, I lifted the yellow fuse F76 up & out . That took about an hour or three. . Putting the fuse back was even harder than removing it
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On 03/25/2013 10:13 AM, Bimmer Owner wrote:

as said by others, buy a clamp-on current meter. it's not like you'd never use it again.
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On Mon, 25 Mar 2013 17:34:25 -0700, jim beam wrote:

I have a Fluke 75, so I'll have to see what clamp on DC current probes fit it.
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On 03/25/2013 08:56 PM, Bimmer Owner wrote:

cheaper to buy a whole new meter!
or google for this guy: "ESI 695 80 Amps DC/AC Low Current Probe"
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On Mon, 25 Mar 2013 21:42:16 -0700, jim beam wrote:

This seems to only be $107 but it doesn't say whether it works with the Fluke 75 or not. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
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On Tue, 26 Mar 2013 04:58:48 +0000, Bimmer Owner wrote:

For the same price, it looks like we can get a separate unit: http://www.westsidewholesale.com/gifts-more/tools-more-clearance/fluke/fluke-t5-600.html
Fluke T5-600, SKU: 133038, $109.95
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On 03/25/2013 10:06 PM, Bimmer Owner wrote:

http://www.westsidewholesale.com/gifts-more/tools-more-clearance/fluke/fluke-t5-600.html

if you want your purchase to be useful for automotive, you want sensitivity. and ability to hook it up to a scope is a huge plus.
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Bimmer Owner wrote:

http://www.westsidewholesale.com/gifts-more/tools-more-clearance/fluke/fluke-t5-600.html

It only does AC amps.. If you look closer, there is no statement about DC current.
You want one that does both and they normally have a Hall detector in the jaws.
Don't waste your money..
Jamie
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On Tue, 26 Mar 2013 18:55:16 -0500, Jamie wrote:

Good catch!
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Bimmer Owner wrote:

Actually that looks good and should work just fine.
That type of probe is self contained, meaning it does not depend on the DMM input impedance for proper match.
BUt 80 Amps is kind of small I think, I have a AC/DC clamp that does 800 amps, but to do low current readings of less than 1 amp becomes a problem with AC. DC I can zero it.
Jamie
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You can increase the sensitivity by winding multiple turns around the clamp on core.
Two turns makes it a 400 amp meter and so on.
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I don't think Fluke makes much in the way of current probes for DC with appreciable sensitivity. The i1010 is sensitive enough for this sort of job, but not for a lot of other things you might want. They do make some fancy intelligent probes but they're all more expensive than just buying a Fluke clamp meter like the 365.
That said, I have a cheapo Extech 380947 and it's not built like the Fluke but it's sensitive enough to detect small ground leakage currents. --scott
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On 03/26/2013 06:07 AM, Scott Dorsey wrote:

way to understate - those things are insanely expensive. otoh, there's almost no competing product, so they have the ability to leverage pricing.
<http://www.digikey.com/scripts/dksearch/dksus.dll?vendor=0&keywordsa4-1090-ND
that's why i settled for the esi unit. not as good as the fluke, but has similar sensitivity in a package robust enough for automotive use.

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wrote:

I agree that the Extech meters are a good buy for the money. I have the 380947 (400 amp) and the 380942 (30 amp + voltmeter).
They are really handy to have in the toolbag.
tm
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