What type of motor oil should I use

What type of motor oil should I use for the following car.
BMW 1987 325 es 193,000 miles Fall and Winter I live in Philadelphia, Pa
Please explain why you choose that type of viscosity please.
Lex
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Why, is this a test?
Why don't you use what was the original spec: 20W50 for summer and 10W40 in cold climates.
FloydR
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Wow, a tough question dude. 10w-30 or 10w-40. Would not try one of the 5W-xx oils in an old car, they are a bit thin.
|| wrote:

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Liqui Moly (LubroMoly in the States) MoS2 10W40 (Mo2 Leichtlauf)
Good antifriction agent, and the correct viscosity range. Very well suited for high milleage german engines.

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Don Corleone,
I can't wait to try this "LubroMoly in the States".
Lex

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In Germany and all the world, LiquiMoly. In the States, the same company name is LubroMoly.

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Thanks for the suggestions. I asked for an explanation because many people I have asked keep suggesting different viscosities. I do not know why! What I have researched is that certain oils provide protection between certain temperature ranges. But why so many, and which to choose is difficult for me to figure out.
Lex

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If you don't have the driver's handbook, worth getting one or downloading it. That will give the oil required. On an old car like this it will be easy to find a modern oil that meets - or exceeds - the spec.
--
*A closed mouth gathers no feet.*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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the new fad is 0w 40.... but in an old car, it can start to leak because it is so thin, not always the best unless all your gaskets are new. stick with what the manual suggests and you'll be fine
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330Xi wrote:

Pop quiz: Which oil is thinner when the engine is running at normal operating temperature? 0W40 or 10W30?
--
-Fred W

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10W-30 - the first figure is the viscosity when cold and the second when hot
I think.....
IMHO YMMV AFAIR etc etc
Nick
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"Nick" wrote

Exactly. That's why saying that 0w-40 is too thin and will start to leak doesn't make sense to me. Oil is at its thinnest when at operating temp (say 100 C), and at that temp, a 0w-40 will be just as thin as a 10w-40 or 15w-40 or a straight 40. And as the temp drops, it only gets thicker from there, not thinner. A 0w-40 will not thicken as much as a 10w-40 when the temps drop.
As to the OP, I'd suggest you use the oil that meets the specs described in the owner's manual.
Cheers,
Pete
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Pete wrote:

You are both quite correct. Just because the first number is low doesn't mean the oil is "thinner".
--
-Fred W

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Uh, if the 0w40 is M1, and it has over 5-7 thousand miles on it, it may be a toss up - but yep, the 10w30 is supposed to be "thinner"
| 330Xi wrote: | > the new fad is 0w 40.... but in an old car, it can start to leak because it | > is so thin, not always the best unless all your gaskets are new. | > stick with what the manual suggests and you'll be fine | > | > | | Pop quiz: | Which oil is thinner when the engine is running at normal operating | temperature? 0W40 or 10W30? | | -- | -Fred W
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No it is just as thick as 10-40, 15-40, or any other 40 . It is just lower viscosity at LOW temps - which only last until it warms up.
If cold 10W-xx isn't leaking, 0W-xx won't be leaking either.
| the new fad is 0w 40.... but in an old car, it can start to leak because it | is so thin, not always the best unless all your gaskets are new. | stick with what the manual suggests and you'll be fine | |
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Assuming the engine is not leaking oil and not burning it at an excessive rate, A good synthetic (Mobil 1, etc) in the recommended (in your owner's manual) viscosity.
You can also go overkill and use Amsoil, Royal Purple, Redline, etc. Great lubricants but very pricey and probably not worth the investment except in a new car where you intend to go with extended change intervals.
R / John

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