1986 IROC 4BBL Carb

What would be a good Carb From Edelbrok with an electric choke. With the standard Air Intake unless I should change that out as well ?
Thanks In Advance.

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When you call Edelbrock up and give them the specifications of your motor they will suggest the correct carbeurator for the application.
...Ron -- 68' Camaro RS 88' Firebird Formula 00' Mustang GT Vert
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The ECM will no longer function when you remove the stock Quadrajet. The ignition is computer controlled so you'll have to replace the distributor with a mechanical vacuum advance unit. The new carb will need to be set up carefully to avoid melting down the catalytic converter. And it'll never be smog legal again. Some future owner will decide to part it out and junk it because all the original emission control parts are missing and all the wiring cut out.
-rev
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You bring up a good point. I woder if you drop in an LS1,6,2,7 etc (which qualify as low emmisions vehicles and probalbly burn cleaner with the stock ECM than even a low mileage 86 IROC) would it be emmisons legal? Or are the laws written so poorly that it would never qualify, even if the engine emitted pure CO2 + water as exhaust gasses.
snipped-for-privacy@fourthgen.org wrote:

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Jimmy wrote:

Most states follow CA law on this (CA has long been a leader in this area) and there is a rule that must be followed to have it be smog legal after an engine change. If you want to put an LS1 in, you can do so and keep it smog legal as long as you put all of the stuff for the newer engine (smog wise) into the car. The basic rule of thumb is, you must have the smog equipment for the year of the body, or the year of the engine, whichever is newer. If the replacement engine is one that was offered in the vehicle for the year it was built, it's classed as a replacement rather than a swap as long as all the emmisions equipment that would have been there is in place. For the new engine, you can often get a kit from a local junkyard that includes all the emmisions and computer stuff (with the exception of the cat which must be bought new according to federal law).
So, if you want to kick it up a notch, the best bet would probably be to get either an upgrade kit from the junkyard, or get a doner car that has been wrecked from behind to get all the engine related parts for your car. If it's an auto, you would also need the auto trans to go with the newer engine, as that is usually part of the emmisions certification. Now, if you do this, in CA (and most other states as most follow CA procedures) once you get it done you take it down and get it inspected by the state smog agency and they replace the underhood smog sticker with one specifying the standards the car must now meet. BTW, the hard and fast rule is that the car must always meet at LEAST the same level standard (for the body style) as was shipped. In other words, you can't go to the truck type engine (pollution amounts are higher for them) but you can go the other way. One deal would be that generally you could not go to diesel from gas, but often you can go the other way. This of course would not apply in your situation.
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It would absolutely be legal. Anything same year or newer, swapped in with all the original emissions related parts, is 49 state legal. California would require approval by the air resources board but that wouldn't be any problem. 330+ HP, better driveability, more reliable, better gas mileage, lower emissions, and increased resale value.
-rev
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snipped-for-privacy@fourthgen.org wrote:

Actually the 49 states all follow CA rules. It's actually quite simple, you do the swap, get everything properly, and then make an appointment at the referree station who will put a new sticker under the hood so you can go get a regular smog test after that.
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Not Virginia. Here the only requirement is that the replacement engine is same year or newer with all emission related parts still attached. No truck engines in cars, of course. Basically just the federal EPA rules. The car must pass an exhaust gas test only in areas that require it.
I put a '92 TPI engine in an '84 Firebird. No referee, no air resourced board, no inspections, no approvals, no stickers. I feel sorry for Californians.
-rev
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snipped-for-privacy@fourthgen.org wrote:

That's basically what the CA requirements are. The only difference is that in CA, you go to a state station the first time after the swap and they replace your factory sticker (the one that says what emmision specs the car meets, which is what the smog place checks it against) with one that reflects the engine you put in. Nothing extaordinary really, just a smog check at a special station so they can verify that you did it correctly. As I understand it, that is done just because the state doesn't trust the private smog stations. But basically what you described is the CA process except for the referee station. We have those in case you can't pass, and it costs more than a certain amount, in which case after you show you have done at least that much work on it to fix the problem, they give you a one year certificate so you can operate it one more year while you fix the problem (the second year you must either pass the test or junk the car). I seem to remember you had to have spent 650 or more trying to fix it (parts cost I believe, but it may be both parts and labor) and you can get by without passing for one year. I actually had to go through this process once because I had changed engines. It was relatively painless, even though I had not done it completely correctly. The tech told me exactly what I needed to do, and then set up another appt for the future and gave me a temp operating sticker while I got the parts I needed and then came back and got the inspection. Frankly it was cheaper than the normal process, since I only had to pay for the cert, the inspection was free. From a money standpoint, I would rather have to referee every time, as it would cost me less in inspection fees. <grin>
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Cy Welch
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You are a Reverend. What did the voices tell you? :)
Al
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I'm In Canada so some things don't apply. I just wanted to put a better carb in, As my IROC is on year 20. But you guys sure brought up some good points. Maybe I'll just do the carb kit ? & clean it up. I'd love to have it all original but the guy who had it before me did some mods on her.
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Redsled wrote:

I would expect that Canadian laws would be similar.
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Cy Welch
89 Camaro RS 5.0 TBI
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They are but when you hit the 20 mark. They cut some slack but not much to say the least. I'm glad they do but at times it sure draws back on what you would like to do to your engine. LOL All in all I think I'll just do the rebuild kit & se what happens or maybe get my poor IROC on that show Overhauling LOL. Or win the Lotto ( I guess I'm stuck with the rebuild.)
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