Brake question?

I am preparing to do a brake job on my '76 vette (with trepidation). I know that the bleeder nipples can be an issue as I have read of them being snapped off. What is the best wat to try to get these guys loose for
bleeding the brakes? A small wrench ? or a socket on top of them? and then the wrench once the bleed tube is on it?
TIA for what may be a dumb question, but I'm not an experienced pro (obviously).
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On Tue, 19 Apr 2005 06:57:07 -0400, "Ebeneezer Geezer"

==============They make a "special" bleeding wrench that is not at all expensive..hollow, and has a place to connect the bleeder hose...I have one and it just nice to have but not really needed...s
I normally take a short 5/16 in box end wrench to open the bleeders... and place the hose over the ned of the valve after I put the wrench on...
Perosnally I have NEVER had a bleeder snap on me...but then again I do not use a 1000 pounds of force closing them either.....
Just do the inner passengers rear 1st...followed by the outer passenger rear then move over to the drivers rear and do the inner 1st then the outer....walk around to the passenger front and bleed the single bleeder then do the drivers front...also single bleeder...
2 person job....without a pressure bleeder... one sitting in the car to push the peddle down while you lay under the car and loosen the bleeder ....
Lots of luck...lol.... The C3 brake system works BUT over time you will find the calibers have a tendance to suck air...which means you will eventyally become a pro a bleeding brakes... lol...its not hard
Bob Griffiths
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If it's not been done in a long time the screws can certainly be very stubborn to loosen. If they don't release with moderate pressure, don't force them any further. At that point you could try tapping around the side of the wrench while it's on the screw with a tack hammer (that's TACK not jack) or fairly lightly with a regular one - kinda like trying to loosen a pickle jar lid. You could also try to *tighten* the screw just a *nudge* then try loosening it. Also, you might try a 6-sided socket just to be sure you don't round the screw's faces before it comes out.
If it looks like it's going the way of a snapped bleeder then you might as well try some heat. Try a propane torch to lightly heat the casting around the screw - not the screw itself. Be very careful here - rubber hoses and fiberglass burn - plus you don't want to get the casting so hot that you're boiling the fluid inside. Then go at it again with the tapping and or tightening.
Be prepared to have to remove the caliper to either have the snapped screw drilled out or you might even just take it to a garage to see if they can remove it. As long as you're bleeding the system, it won't matter much if you have to remove the caliper anyway.
Oh yes, one more thing...
Lefty loosey, righty tighty.
Here's waving to ya - \||||
Owen ___
'67BB & '72BB ___
"To know the world intimately is the beginning of caring." -- Ann Hayman Zwinger
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Well I'm going to cop out here. Do the brake job, then call Goodyear and see what they charge to flush the old fluid and bleed the system. I did it that way the last time I changed the brakes and replaced the master cylinder, they charged $58.00 and I found a $10.00 coupon online. I didn't have the pressure bleeder and didn't like the last one I had and didn't have anyone around to help me. Another benefit is that they double check your work and if you're not a pro, that's a plus and they also guarantee their work. I chose Goodyear because they allowed me to furnish my own high temp brake fluid, where Firestone and others refused.
--
Charlie
!993 Corvette Convertible
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wrote:

===================== You know for 58 bucks I may just let them do it the next time I have to bleed my brakes...... I have a Motive products Pressure bleeder and always have proplems getting the adaptor to seal on the master cyl of C3's... just a pain honestly... Going to Spring Carlisle tomorrow and a new adaptor from KD Tools or similar... is high on my WANT list...
Bob G.
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I don't know why you guys don't just buy four jack stands, stick it in the air, pull all four wheels, and crack the bleeders on a front and back, then walk off for awhile.
Surely you have better things to do in the car than bleed brakes.
Come back in 10 minutes, check fluid, check for bubbles, come back in another 10 minutes, close those bleeders, open another set. Sure it takes about 45 min - 1 hour to do it all, but you are only spending 10 minutes or so on the car itself. The rest of that time you can be sweeping the floor, building an AMT model of your car, watching TV, waxing one of the other ones, etc.

it
didn't
have
temp
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AMT??? Revell was the way to go when I was a kid in the 60's. LOL
I was a model car NUT! I had a couple hundred or so.
Tom in Missouri wrote:

--
Ric Seyler
Online Racing: RicSeyler
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Because when I take my car over a hundred miles an hour, I want to know for a fact that it will stop. Same when I drive in traffic. Nice to have that confidence and someone to go back on if it doesn't happen.
--
Charlie
!993 Corvette Convertible
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Charlie,
I've been well over that 100 mph mark, like in the 180 mph range. And I was at those speeds for much longer than a 2 minute dash, braking in the corners down to 100 and back up to speed again. Try running that way for 100 miles or so.
If it didn't work, I wouldn't be here to tell you to do it.

then
or
floor,
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Drip bleeding has been around for years...... you just have to keep an eye on the fluid level in the M/C..
Charlie wrote:

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Ric Seyler
Online Racing: RicSeyler
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wrote:

================Never had a lot of success using gravity bleeding on my cars... and the wife has problems sitting in the car when it is up on the lift (even the 4 poster)...so I use a pressure bleeder... BUT one of the sharks has a soft pedal and needs to bleed before I drive it. Normal spring time thing with this car....
So I may give gravity another chance...just for fun...to experiment etc. I'm never too old to learn new things...
What is the exact procedure you use...?
Car up and level???? And to be honest I never opened a front and back bleeder at the same time atempting to gravity bleed...maybe that is why I never had a lot of succsess...
Thanks Bob Griffiths
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It was nice to get it all flushed clean, it hadn't been done in a while and they can't flush it without bleeding it. It's really a good deal. I've pretty much decided having the system flushed added to my annual maintenance routine.
--
Charlie
!993 Corvette Convertible
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