DAWN, clean to a fault.

Page 1 of 4  
Since I may have been guilty of starting this silly subject by stating that I use Dawn to wash my car here is some of what is said about Dawn soap on
http://www.dawn-dish.com /
Don't put the Dawn away after the dishes are done. Dawn is great for all sorts of other chores. Try it diluted in water to clean appliance exteriors, chandeliers and light fixtures, painted woodwork, and more. -- -- Note: Painted, as in what is used to coat sheet metal and plastic automotive parts. In this case they recommend it for some of the toughest, appliances, and weaker, woodwork. Automotive paint falls in between those finishes.
Dawn Complete is a breakthrough dish liquid that delivers excellent tough-food cleaning technology while improving the look and feel of your hands with a formula that contains vitamin E- and B5-enhanced microgels. Who ever thought doing the dishes might lead to more beautiful hands? -- -- Might be gentle enough to wash your Ford.
Make Dawn Dishwashing Liquid/Antibacterial Hand Soap part of your routine handwashing. It's great every day and is always ready for those greasy challenges. Tough on greaseand bacteria on hands! -- -- Should be safe enough to kiss your car goodnight.
Dawn is the product of choice for major rehabilitation organizations to clean oil off birds injured in oil spills. -- -- Come to think of it I haven't seen any ducks that shine like they have any wax on them. Must be gentle or the duck would squawk about it to the news media.
Ingredient information (other than what's on the label) is confidential. You may want to visit the Soap & Detergent Association's website at http://www.sdahq.org . They provide a list of general ingredients commonly used in hand dishwashing products. Once you arrive at their site, choose Dishwashing, Fact Sheet Notebook, then Hand Dishwashing Products. Scroll down the page a bit and you will find the ingredient list.
Does Procter & Gamble recommend that it be used as a car wash soap, no, can it be used to wash a car, yes. Why would they if it cut into the car wash soap industry they are connected with? Surfactants are the main active ingredients in dish washing soap along with oil, sometime vegetable oil, and both are used in liquid car wash soap.
As a side note even though Dawn also contains alcohol you should not drink it, just a thought, Windex has a higher quantity but still not drinkable. What I'm saying is the kind of ingredients makes the product, how much dictates its use.
2006 Procter & Gamble. All Rights Reserved. Dawn is a registered trademark of Procter & Gamble. All copy and claims valid in the U.S.
--
Dad
05 C6 Silver/Red 6spd Z51
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For arguments sake here's what Sal Zaino says in his instructions for preping a car for his excellent polish.
"I would definitely recommend you remove the wax buildup on your paint. Just use Liquid Dawn (hand dishwashing liquid) as a car wash. It has a high alkaline content which cuts right thru carnauba wax, paraffin, silicone oils, etc. This will get your paint finish squeeky clean and wax free."
Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and that added alcohol does make it squeaky clean. Used to use Zaino that people gave me at the shop but it is little better than just doing a good polish and wax. WAY over priced and just poured their cleaners into the gallon can I get cleaners in, same results. Thanks for the reminder.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dawn removes wax, my point exactly!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Actually here's what you said - - "Its not an old wifes tale. You shouldn't use a chamois either, you should use terry cloth or microfiber towels to dry a car. Yes it takes of everything then leaves a residue. You clearly don't have an understanding of how dish soap works on automotive finsishes, but you won't change because your too cheap."
What I'm trying to figure out is how "it takes of(f) everything and leaves a residue". How do you take off everything and leave something on the surface??
Is that what it does on your Corvette?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would have thought it would be clear. It would leave a residue AFTER it takes off whats on it. So if you still don't understand that concept I don't know what else there is.
I said that it MAY leave a residue.
The only thing I am refering to is WAX. Dawn takes off WAX. Thats the only thing. If your goal is to take off the wax for whatever reason, then it doesn't matter if you use Dawn.
Does it do that on my Corvette, well I wouldn't use Dawn to start with. I have seen it (Dawn) strip off wax on other cars.
If you are talking about Dawn damaging the Paint / Clearcoat then thats different. I don't think Dawn would damage Paint or Clearcoat.
This is going to be my last comment on this topic, it's time to move on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You're so easy, but do enjoy your Corvette. ;-))
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dawn is strong stuff. If you wash your Vette with Dawn I would rinse car afterwards to remove the Dawn. Wash the dishes a few times using Dawn . It would leave your hands extremely dry. Thats why you see women use gloves while washing dishes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Men must just like dry hands? You don't see men use gloves while washing dishes?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then they go on to say "Do not make a habit of washing your car with Dawn! " http://www.lazaino.com/ApplyZaino.htm
--
All the best,

Stephen
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You mean like in use our stuff at a real soaker of a price?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No doubt it's in their best interest, in fact they need to believe "specialized" products are better. Yet common sense cuts through the hype. All soap removes wax. I don't for a second belive that there's a soap that can do a good job at taking away the dirt but not some of the wax.
--
All the best,

Stephen
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It is interesting you prefer Dawn to do the cleaning, Dad. They hype how mild it is with the cleaning of waterfowl in the oil spills. However, I've always wondered about that, because one of the primary needs of the cleaning is to remove a very hard to remove petroleum product.
I used to use Ivory dish washing liquid to clean bare engine blocks for rebuilding. Talk about strip any oil away. A block would rust before your eyes while washing. We used to wash and rinse and have someone spraying WD40 as soon as the hose was off an area.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dad wrote:

We don't get Dawn on this side of the pond afaik, but I wouldn't use it if we did simply because of the (probable) salt content. Get some of that trapped in a crevice somewhere & it'll kick-off the rusting process in no time, & make aluminium go furry.
It may not be an issue if you always rinse with a few hundred gallons of water to make absolutely certain it's all out, but that kind of defeats the object of using something ecologically friendly in the first place.
<Corvette Content>
After much fiddling with wires & spraying of WD40, I now have a (nearly) full set of electrics & an engine that turns over. I'll syphon out the very old & smelly fuel this weekend, put some fresh in, & see if it'll start. I'm anticipating much backfiring...
</CC>
--
Preston.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You're kidding, right?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dad wrote:

No - honest. Get some salty suds trapped in a crevice like a windscreen surround/chassis section/door channel etc & it will accelerate corrosion. There's many a motorbike out there with furry white alloy parts & rust patches in engine casing crevices for precisely this reason.
--
Preston.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

you're using? What percent in each? Where does it show up the most on your Corvette? How do you discern the difference between acid rain and salt in your soap/water/air? Do you live on the coast in the UK?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dad wrote:

If I had time to research answers to all those questions I would, but I haven't - all spare time's allocated to restoring that rusting lump in the garage! The last one's easy though - no (unfortunately). Have you /seen/ the price of houses on the coast here...
My point though is that dish-washing liquids do generally have a very high salt content, so I personally choose not to use them when there are salt-free alternatives. Every little helps, right? If they work for you then fine, but a lot of people don't know about the salt, & may not be as thorough at rinsing.
Some people even use normal detergent as a lubricant when changing tyres on alloy wheels - then wonder why their rims start to flake apart. Plain water & acid rain don't cause that.
--
Preston.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Since you stated it had a salt content I just assumed you had the answers, or were you just guessing? What is the lump that is rusting in the garage? That shouldn't use much of your time to answer. The is a web site that tells the 10 best uses for Dawn and one of those, #10, is for rust prvention, go figure. What has been affected on your Corvette?

Yes, last August. Why, have you one to sell?

What is the high content? Actually a high content, over 3% by volume will kill its ability to suds.

Standard practice around here and it's also used to prevent galling of stainless steel threads.
Here is some more baseless fears that are passed around the internet - http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/dawn.asp

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dad wrote:

Partly guessing as the Dawn website doesn't list the ingredients. It does however link to another site with 'typical contents', one of which is salt, & I thought it was common knowledge these things contain salt. The contents posted by 'No Vette Yet' list four different types of sodium, two of which are 2nd & 3rd in the list (after water). As these things are usually listed in order of quantity, it seems a fairly safe bet that it's pretty salty.

My '81 'vette that's been sat in a field for the last few years.

I can't figure that - it makes no sense whatsoever. But if it's on the web it must be true...

Everything - but that's due to it sitting outside in Wales for several years.

Eh? I just said I don't live on the coast.

'Some'. If 'No Vette Yet's' list of contents is in order (which would seem to be the case given water's first & colouring last), the 2nd & 3rd highest constituents of Dawn are sodium, with two different types further down the list. So sodium is the 2nd highest constituent after water.

As you say "more" baseless fears, I presume you think mine are baseless? That may be true, but it does contain salt - fact (most detergents use it as the surfactant). And salt does increase corrosion in steel & aluminium - fact.
I don't know why you're getting so defensive, especially as I haven't slated you for using it - just said that I choose not to, & stated why.
--
Preston.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.