Don't believe Corvette owners lies about supposed fuel economy

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Josh S wrote:


Actually it the mass required to be accelerated and how quickly it's done that determines urban mileage. Since the piss-ant engines in the smaller engined vehicles aren't capable of accelerating anything quickly it's simply more difficult to get poor mileage, but the people who buy them typically haven't a clue about what goes on under the hood anyway.
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wrote:

I was under the impression a significant amount of gas is simply wasted while idling at traffic lights or in traffic jams. I forget where I read it, but something between 15 and 20% of fuel is used while sitting still. At four bucks for a gallon, that means 70 cents or so doesn't move you anywhere.
AJM '93 Ruby coupe, 6 sp (both tops)
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CardsFan wrote:

Accurate impression!
One measure...reset the average mileage on the DIC while in traffic and note the numbers plummet while sitting at a light.
During a March trip I rented a Prius. Impressive at a light--the only energy goes to power the stereo and the displays.
It was a cool week so I've no clue as to what they do with the a/c at a light.
-- pj
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pj wrote:

'04 and later run off the battery, before that if it was set to Max the engine would run.
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The Prius runs the AC off the battery.
I checked out the Malibu hybrid and noted that the mileage was not good compared to the Camry - now I know why. The Malibu hybrid has no electrical component. The fuel shuts off when the car stops and starts the engine when you press the gas. Hell I can do that manually with my truck. Now I have a hybrid!
wrote:

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On a 30 mile highway near my home, I indicated 36 MPG at 60 MPH, 6th gear, with one passenger. At 70 it dropped to 33.
I think GM needs to look at power to weight ratios and gear ratios to get some economy in the dogs they sell. A high overdrive in a 7-spd automatic transmission would go a long way to cutting fuel expenses.
While I am on this rant, I drove my 2000 Ford Ranger (V6 Flex Fuel, FWD, 24 MPG highway) to Strasburg, PA for a conference. We have NO Ethanol E-85 stations in Northern Virginia. I found an E-85 station in Strasburg, filled up on E-85 at $2.50 per gallon and got 23 MPG highway. Something is wrong with the oil companies in Northern Virginia - wonder if they are keeping the bio-fuel people out?
Bob 2000 C5

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...killed Nissan crosspost
Bob Drake wrote:

That comparison on mileage seems a bit apples & oranges since the Ford in question is designed to a 'truck-rated' (semi-commercial) duty cycle with limited reserve horsepower and the 'vette is designed for a gigantic reserve horsepower and non-commercial duty cycle.
I've no clue as to where Corvette engineers established their, "standard-day, max continuous sustained r-w horsepower rating." I do know that they have increased it over the years. Compared to my C4, the C5 ('02) can sustain higher speeds across the desert without cooling issues. Arguably, another apples-and-oranges comparison since the C4 is auto and my C5 is manual.
The talk about E-85 and Bio fuels is nice but Bio is very limited in production potential and availability. That isn't going to change. (I feel pretty sure that when I croak in 10-15 years, I'll be able to order a chunk of steak for my final meal.)
"Alternative" fuels are fine for grad-students or hippies with a modified VW bus going cross- country. They aren't sufficient in quantity for any energy company to consider making an investment to store, distribute and market them. ..... "sorry honorable customer -- no frying oil until 6 a.m.... after McDonalds changes the fat in their deep fryers."
The distribution issues in Ethanol preclude it's use West of the Rockies unless we toss much of our sugar beet production into the game--that would raise hell with our farm commodity and beef cattle production. Flex-fuel or E85 logos on the vehicles in California are a joke. Ain't gonna happen here. The long-term, bottomline economics in these fuels--after give-away subsidies expire--make them a foolhardy investment unless something very magic happens in how they are grown and made.
Unless 90% of us immediately adopt a diet of twigs and nuts, we are dependent on gasoline and we've got to learn how to best use it. About the only way to extract ourselves from this lockstep is to move power generation to Nuclear and then power municipal travel with electricity leaving petrol for long-haul highway and airplane transport. Meanwhile, it's going to be a rough several years and we've got to just suck it up.
Alternative--set on our hands, bitch and become a fourth world country.
We are no longer in control of this. Oil and gasoline are increasingly traded on foreign markets. We now make more money exporting Diesel and other distillates (JP etc.) than by selling them domestically. -- pj
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wrote:

Where have you been? Have your head in the sand? You're only about 35 years too late now to make these statements. Next you're going to tell me to shut off my electricity for Green Day. BS.
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observer wrote:

It isn't the sand where you will find the head of that jerkoff.
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On Fri, 25 Apr 2008 04:43:47 -0500, observer wrote:

It's been part of engineering degrees in UK since the early '80s. My final year dissertation in '82 was on renewable energy sources.
Trouble is that it's been at a premium cost and very few have been willing to pay for it. Now energy is expensive it's making sense economically.
--
Peter Hill
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