I'm buiyng a C3...

Hi I'm an italian vette lover, I'm buying my first corvette, I like classic cars so my choice now is a C3 Obiouvsly I like most the C1 and C2 but now I can effort a C3.
My question is: What I've to watch to buy a 99% original 1975-1977 C3? Is there something I've to be aware in buying this beauty? The engine # must match with car # but there is more to be aware? Thanks
Lumini Mattia - www.luminimattia.com
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http://www.corvettefaq.com/gotvette.asp
I Lavoratori wrote:

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Rust on the frame..Corvettes do rust badly there....don't ever buy a Michigan , NY or Minnesota car...or any other snow belt cars from where ever...!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Whoa boy. Easy there. Don't get excited. I'm from Michigan, and belong to a club with over 130 members. 95 percent of the cars have never been driven in the winter, and most have absolutely perfect frames and metal parts. Yes there are rust buckets, but there are more of them in the southern, ocean salt atmosphere areas. Like anything. Get it up and check it out. Don't eliminate 75 percent of the market because of unreasonable fears.

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Same thing applies in Minnesota, Corvettes get stored thru the winter. So it's also not too hard to find extremely low mileage MN 'vettes. 'course "grayfox" frequently posts some real illogic, so thats not odd coming from him.
Craig wrote:

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I Lavoratori wrote:

Good luck in your search!
Your first concern should be rust damage... in the frame, suspension, and the metal "bird cage" that surrounds the windshield, cowl, and doors; repairs here can be very costly. Second is the condition of the fiberglass, especially signs of extensive damage repairs on the underside of panels; again, repairs can be very costly and repairs may require a repaint. Condition and correct color of the paint are also important, it's expensive to do a quality repaint. Next concern probably should be the condition of the electrical system, especially the wiring harnesses, because some owners have really messed these up while adding aftermarket accessories. Originality of the engine components is a consideration, as owners tend to add/change components in attempts to make it go faster or look cooler. Chrome plating is expensive, so consider that, and also the quality and originality of the interior upholstery. Although the condition of the drivetrain is important, it usually can be rebuilt, so numbers are the main consideration here if numbers are important to you.
If you are really intent on getting a "99% original" Corvette, you'll need to become familiar with the various serial, part, and date markings that exist on many parts of the car. To do that, you need more information than can be given in a newsgroup post. Here is a website that discusses "matching numbers" and has a section telling you what publications are available to help you determine if the numbers are right on a particular car:
http://tinyurl.com/6zycx
NCRS.org is a good source for publications, such as judging guides and restoration manuals.
A Corvette does not have to be 99% original to be a delight to drive and own, however.
If possible, enlist the help of a person knowledgeable on the model Corvette you wish to buy. Be aware that eBay Corvette listings are rife with scammers, so be careful where you look for your new Corvette, and inspect it carefully (or hire someone dependable to do that for you) BEFORE you hand over any money. There are reputable dealers who specialize in Corvettes here in the US (Corvette Mike comes to mind), perhaps other posters can make recommendations); they may cost more, but you can be reasonably assured they are accurately describing the vehicle they sell you. Unfortunately not all Corvette dealers can be trusted to correctly and fully describe the originality and condition of their cars. NCRS puts out a publication about 3 or 4 times a year ("the Driveline") that contains ads from individuals, but even here you need to be careful.
Where will you be shopping for your C3?
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Wayne nailed it pretty good ; pay particular attention to the frame rail directly in front of the rear wheels . If you email me, Ill give you a formal list of 75 things to check on a C3 which I have. There is also a book out called : Secrets of Buying a (C3) Corvette which has many pictures for closely examining this era Vette. Finally, have it looked over by a qualified Corvette Mechanic if there is one nearby .
Dave
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Thanks very much to all of you guys... in particular WayneC Your suggestions are very helpful and I'm buying two book the could help me in buying my dream-car... I'll buy my C3 before the end of January because it could take 2 month to arrive here in Italy, then I have to do the italian immatriculation and it take other 2 month.... I want my beuaty to be on the road for the summer! Thanks again I'll keep in touch to tell you my progress... You know for us (italian) the corvette is one of that car that tell to us "ride the american dream" and think that with the money of a C3 here in Italy I can't buy even a new city-car, here a new city car (volkswagen, mercedes, bmw, audi) could cost about ? 18/20.000 ($25.0000!!!!!!!!!!) Thanks and ... see you later!
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I Lavoratori wrote:

Those new cars aren't much cheaper here. Volkswagen new Beetles go for $18,000+, Passats begin at $22k, and the other brands you mention start closer to $30,000 and go up considerably from there. C6 Corvette convertibles are around $55K.
You can check out our new-car prices here: http://www.kbb.com /
Now, if I was in Italy, I'd probably look for a Ferrari or a Maserati. Pretty much all of them are out of my reach... at least the ones I'd want, like a 330gt, or a 355 Spyder (considerably above the price of a new C6).
Good hunting, and may the import taxes and shipping be kind to you, too.
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Re:

Reminds me of what a friend of mine from holland recently told me. He wanted to buy a 2005 Ford Mustang, but it retails for nearly 7k EUROs over the price one can pay for it here(The Euro is stronger than the dollar).
SO theres Taxes and Registration and Import duty charges for you...
He currently owns an 80s TVR 350i ('84 i think) he got about 5 years ago. He tells me it seems to spend more time in the shop than on the road.
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Re:

Reminds me of what a friend of mine from holland recently told me. He wanted to buy a 2005 Ford Mustang, but it retails for nearly 7k EUROs over the price one can pay for it here(The Euro is stronger than the dollar).
SO theres Taxes and Registration and Import duty charges for you...
He currently owns an 80s TVR 350i ('84 i think) he got about 5 years ago. He tells me it seems to spend more time in the shop than on the road.
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