Meguiars spray on wax ??

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is it any good ? anyone use it ?
I have swirl marks when i look at my car (77' vette, black) in the sunlight. It makes me wince...
just thought I'd try some of this and wanted to know if anyone has used
it yet.
thanks AP
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Meguiar's has many great products. Personally, I'm using the liquid NXT for my base 'wax'.
But, you need to get rid of the swirl marks before you apply any wax. You might want to invest in a polisher that they sell rather than do it all by hand.
Check out their forum for more help and tips: http://www.meguiarsonline.com /

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wrote:

Ok, here is my secret recipe for washing my car. Don't tell anyone <grin> but I developed it about 4 years ago after piecing together what I read on the net. I only wish I thought of it sooner. It will probably make your car need a lot less wax (but I'd still wax). I can't give you exact quantities but I don't think too much will hurt the car finish.
I use a decent car wash soap (ie: Meguiars is fine), vinegar (guessing about 1/2 cup) and "Jetdry" (4 or 5 squirts) into a bucket of water and wash.
Note: where I live, the water is very hard; I don't know if vinegar and Jetdry need to be both used but I do it and am very satisfied with results.
Then I use the same minus the soap into a garden sprayer (less vinegar and less Jetdry mixed with water in attachment) attached to my water hose to rinse the car. Then I dry it with decent cotton rags (tho by this time it needs little).
The result is my newer cars (3 of them, oldest is about 3.5 years old and isn't garaged ever and we have HOT summers) need less waxing and the wax goes on / off easier. They shine as nearly as when they left the dealer. And the water just seems to stay repelled off the paint finish even to this day. And I looked real hard in the sun at the 3.5 year old car (solid white color) and I can barely see a water spot anyway nor swirl marks from waxing.
Good Luck.
ps-- I'm no expert on car products but I do like Meguiar products. I won't say they are the best but I would say they are very good. And I have 2 polishers (I think a 9" and 6") and I'd recommend the 6" first (less weight and easier to deal with around rounded shapes) but the 9" is probably better for flat hoods, trunk lids over larger flat areas but the 6" can still do it fine (maybe just take a little longer).
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Take a look at Mothers brand. They have a great detail PDF on thier website.
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<No Vette Yet> wrote in message wrote:

Good luck, unless you're very lucky that will not remove the swirl marks, it will only re-arrange them. First off you need a buffer, not a polisher, with the correct pad (s). Second if you don't know which finishing compound to use such as 3M you are headed for a problem. Talk to the local automotive paint supplier to find out how to do it correctly.

One comment, when you rinse the car do it with an open hose and flood the water over the entire surface. It will sheet off and leave less water to wipe off. In other words, don't spray rinse.

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Dad, your way is much easier but I'm hesitant to do this because of the "hard" water we have here. I'm trying NOT to have the hard water touch my car so I try to always dilute my hard water before it touches my car whether it's the soap application or the rinse.
Perhaps your way is fine if you don't have very much hard water??? Back when I lived in NY, there was no need to use this special solution... just car wash soap and garden hose water did well. Of course, I still waxed then.
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<No Vette Yet> wrote in message wrote:

Doesn't matter, hard or soft, it will sheet off by flooding versus spraying.
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The way I spray, it does flood it <grin> and then runs off as you said. I won't take the chance of the hard water even touching my newer cars and you can bet when and if I do buy a vette, it will be the same way.
And in case anyone asks, no I don't bring my cars to car washes ... in fact the last time I did was about 27 years ago and I almost lost my antenna (when they were a stand alone mast).
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<No Vette Yet> wrote in message

Spray does not sheet off, run off, yes, but do it your way. No need to just try it once and see what it does. Not to long ago I had a black Seville, a black C5 and the black '72, when I washed all 3 on a warm day it was easy to sheet the water off and not get streaks. Oh, by the way, all I use is Dawn dish soap.
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Dawn Dish Soap... that's one way to take off the wax and possibly leave a nasty residue. You should always use a car wash product made for washing cars.
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why? because the car wash products advertising says so :-) its written that way to sale car wash products made for washing cars.
my2
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If you knew how the products worked you would soon change your way of thinking.
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wrote:

One of the many things the company I worked for was to supply pumps to all sorts of automotive operations. Mainly heavy mastics, paint, grease, oil, anti-freeze, transmission fluid, paint fillers as powder, and materials in other industries such as perfume, blood, guts, corn mash, acid, ink, resins, driveway sealers. Among the specific product lines were OEM equipment suppliers for car wash chains, about 12, and laundries for big hospitals, about 18. For me to spec and build the pump or system that they bought and used, a fair knowledge of the materials in the pump and what it was going to pump was mandatory.
I still have a list of all of those companies, about 220, so if you need to check some of that out, let me know. Some that I was in, Softrol, Sun Automation, Autech, Brite-O-Matic Mfg, Gin San, KO Inc., & Mark VII. WOW, was I stupid, that file was created 7 years ago and very early in the morning, going in early and working late got me an early retirement, actually that was a good thing, don't miss it at all.
Let me know what I missed about how the products works so I can change my mind.
Old and grouchy,
--
Dad
05 C6 Silver/Red 6spd Z51
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So you built pumps... how does that apply to automotive finishes applied to cars?
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Chemical compatibility.
So all you got out of that was that I build pumps? Why do you think I included the names of OEM suppliers of carwash equipment and supplies? They sell soap for car wash facilities, check out their soap and Dawn and see if there are any similarities. Chemical compatibility.
If the material and elastomembers in the pump are not compatible with the material being pumped the results are pump failures. Unhappy customer, warranty work, loss of business, and a bad company name. Chemical compatibility.
Automotive finishes are applied to cars by pumps, through many applicators such as spray guns, turbo bells, and dip tanks. Chemical compatibility.
None of that work was done without knowing how any chemical reacted to other materials such as soap on car finishes. Chemical compatibility charts are available for confirmation of what will or will not harm another material, check it out.
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Seems like you don't know how automtovie finishes work. A chemical in a liquid state does not have the same properties once it is dry.
Check Dawn and car wax, then tell me that Dawn doesn't remove it. You know darn well (or you should) that Dawn will remove wax from cars.
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I'm no expert but when I use to have my cars detailed, they didn't use dawn soap nor chamois (sp??) but did use terry cloth. I don't remember what they used for the soap now but I don't believe it was dishwashing soap.
Since then, I've read a lot about car finishes and the consensus is to use terry cloth or microfiber towels for wiping the car dry. And most car people nowadays seem to NOT like dishwashing soap for car washing but I seem to recall that old timers (of my dad's age... WWII vet) use to say on the OLD cars that dishwashing soap was fine. I don't know if that had to do with the lack of clear coat on the old cars or not.
But to repeat in more or less words that Dad (here) said earlier.... do what works for you !! That seems to be the answer no matter what your opinion is <grin>.
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uh? I do know how the products work and I sure could spend extra $$$'s on them. but, I also know how advertising strategies work. looks like they worked with you, hook, line and sinker.
nothing bad intended
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Then you are even more misguided than I thought.
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duh? its you that's being "misguided" :-)
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