Mini Petrol Powered Corvette 'Go-Kart' For Sale (7ft Long) On UK Ebay

Page 6 of 7  


That's an extreme example, though - most models only have a 4 year life cycle before a major facelift.
More questionable would be the difference between a car made in 1998 and one made in 2000. Because there's no specification difference between the two, both could be registered on the same day and have the same value. Happens all the time, even with the silly American 'model year' crap.

<checks registration years of vehicles owned>
Looks like you're wrong there.
--
SteveH 'You're not a real petrolhead unless you've owned an Alfa Romeo'
www.italiancar.co.uk - Honda VFR800 - Hongdou GY200 - Alfa 75 TSpark
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 23 Nov 2006 20:52:34 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@italiancar.co.uk (SteveH) wrote:

But in the US, used cars are priced first according to the model year, then mileage, condition, etc. regardless of when they were first registered - or 'titled,' as they call it.

Pay attention. You missed the part where I deliberately said, "in general..."
You're not telling me that "planned obsolescence" isn't a marketing factor there, are you? You need to read a history book or two.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But a 'model year' designation doesn't mean anything. In the original example, GM were making 1984 model year C4s in March 1983. How can that make any sense?
The 1984 model year car was probably produced for over 18 months before it was changed to 1985 model year....
That's just nonsense and shows that model year marketing means absolutely nothing.

You appear to have missed the bit when you accused *me*, personally of being taken in by registration letters. Which I'm obviously not.

Of course it is, but 1 year model cycles wouldn't work in Europe, we're too intelligent over here to be taken in by that.
--
SteveH 'You're not a real petrolhead unless you've owned an Alfa Romeo'
www.italiancar.co.uk - Honda VFR800 - Hongdou GY200 - Alfa 75 TSpark
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 23 Nov 2006 21:16:13 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@italiancar.co.uk (SteveH) wrote:

I never said that. I was talking about the concept of planned obsolescence, on the part of carmakers, being too subtle for you to know of or understand. Which it appears to be. QED.

Well, whether it's a one, two, or three year cycle is kind of irrelevant to the argument, don't you think? Are you denying planned obsolescence? Will you deny the holocaust next? Will you assert creationism? (OK, I'm getting dangerously close to Darwinning this thread).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dean Dark wrote:

'Godwinning'. HTH.
My car was built in 1996. It could be a Mark 1 (made from 1993-1996) or a Mark 2 (made from 1996-2000) model.
It's an N-registered car.
So if it was for sale, it would be a 1996 Mk.1 Mondeo 2.0 GLS, N-reg.
1996 - year it was made. Could be N-reg or P-reg in 1996. N-reg - reg letters run August-August (or did then) so first half of 96. Mark 1 - major version number GLS - specification level 2.0 - engine size
Is that any better?
Generally, the year only matters when it gets to 3 or 4 years old, the letter only before that, and to snobs. Like model years over there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of course. Brain fart, sorry.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Much the same as here, then. But with all other things equal, of course, date of registration, the easiest way to tell the "age" of a car, is going to influence the price.
--
"For want of the price of tea and a slice, the old man died."



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I love the way the topic has digressed but I thought I would show the orginal post for those who may be interested!!!
Happy thanksgiving to all the USA readers and posters
Ian ____________________________________
I am selling, on behalf of a family member, a Mini Petrol Powered Corvette You can sit in it and it will run at about 22 mph
It has never been run or used but has been in storage for over 10 years.
It is listed on ebay and can be found using the following link
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Mini-Petrol-Powered-Corvette-Go-Kart-Style-Car-7ft-Long_W0QQitemZ120055945178QQihZ002QQcategoryZ9883QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
Happy bidding if you are interested and thank you in advance for looking.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveH wrote:

That's not true: American manufacturers often make minor, cosmetic changes model-year to model-year. This is how Anoraks can spot a model-year at 20 paces.
--
vulgarandmischevious

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's just to justify the 'model year' designation, though.
I'm not denying that they do it - this whole debate was sparked because it was claimed you can't have a 1983 C4, because GM called cars built in March 1983 a 1984 model year car. Doesn't stop it from being built in 1983, and therefore a 1983 car - from what I can gather, the 1985 model year didn't come into production until late 1984.
--
SteveH 'You're not a real petrolhead unless you've owned an Alfa Romeo'
www.italiancar.co.uk - Honda VFR800 - Hongdou GY200 - Alfa 75 TSpark
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveH wrote:

I'm not talking about the reason why: I'm questioning your claim, in the post quoted above, that "there's no specification difference". There is. You are wrong.
--
vulgarandmischevious

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@italiancar.co.uk (SteveH) realised it was Thu, 23 Nov 2006 22:38:09 +0000 and decided it was time to write:

Our system is even simpler: only the car's registration number is needed. The computer knows the rest.
(alt.autos.corvette added again, just for lafs)
--
Y.

'All parts falling off of this car are of
the highest quality British manufacture'
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Heh, good point. However, most places prefer the VIN just in case there's been a plate change - eg. my Alfa 75 plate is no good on dealer systems as it's not the original plate.

Evil bastard ;-)
--
SteveH 'You're not a real petrolhead unless you've owned an Alfa Romeo'
www.italiancar.co.uk - Honda VFR800 - Hongdou GY200 - Alfa 75 TSpark
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Model years are much more complicated than simply ways for manufacturers to cheat you out of your money.
Environmental issues -
The EPA in the US issues regulations based on model years. Yes, they could say all cars registered after 1/1/2000 must comply with ..., however, as pointed out here several times, new cars may or may not get registered immediately after being produced.
So would it be right to have a car built to the pre-1/1/2000 requirement, say built 11/30/1999, have to be junked due to it not being sold and registered prior to 1/1/2000? The use of model year eases this problem, gives a clear switch-over in the production for incorporating new regulations, and allow manufacturers to not be penalized because someone didn't buy and register the car quick enough.
Real life case: In 1978, Chevrolet announced the Pace Car model. Many people bought these and trailered them to long-term storage, as they intended these to be investments. However, as many know, the investment dream failed and so many were later registered and driven on the street as regular cars.
Should Chevrolet be punished for building a car built to 1978 standards that is first registered in 1984 or 1988, which of course does not meet those 1984 or 1988 standards?
Safety regulations -
Same situations, each manufacturer has to comply with safety equipment that complies with the standards for a given date. However, the MODEL year is certified, not the model, as some models range over several years and thus several different standards.
Buying New Old Stock -
Unlike the UK where I have seen two and three year old "new" Minis in dealers waiting to be sold, in the US, the model year automatically establishes a car as old when the model year changes. Thus buyers are protected from buying a car that is three years old, even if it has zero miles, for the same price as a new car which was built a week or month ago. There are laws that regulate this.
A little help for Yahoo - UK finds:
The Rover Defender apparently refers to model years as this article on the Defender 03 model year. http://www.carpages.co.uk/land_rover/land_rover_defender_paris_motor_show_26_09_02.asp
-- Fiat introduce the new Panda "Model Year 2007" http://www.italiaspeed.com/index_files/fiat/fiat_index_035.html
-- More style, safety and performance for 2004 model year RAV4, http://www.compucars.co.uk/investigate-news-detail.asp?w=&page=&article (1
-- Ka and Fiesta - enter the 2001 model year http://www.just-auto.com/article.aspx?art 800&type=1
excel History and Classification - apparently, Lotus does use model years. http://users.cs.cf.ac.uk/Robert.V.Thomas/lotusexcel/history.htm
and http://www.grouplotus.com/car/news_detail.php?idc
So model year is not unheard of in the UK, just not used that much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom in Missouri ( snipped-for-privacy@spam.com) gurgled happily, sounding much like they were saying :

Which is the way it's done here.
DVLA keep no manufacturing date information. The one exception is when a car is registered as a historic vehicle (free road tax), which requires a manufacturing date prior to 1/1/73. It's the owner's responsibility to prove that date, usually by writing to the manufacturer.

That's the way it works here. You find a new-unregistered MGB, you won't be able to register it as new. You can register it on an age-related plate, though, by proving the manufacture date.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Adrian wrote:

Model years mean little in the U.K. Configuration control and the concept of interchangeable parts within model years was never understood by those folk.
--
PJ

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PJ ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) gurgled happily, sounding much like they were saying :

Nah, it's just that we can do it more often than once a year.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveH wrote:

reasons, at every new model year is "minor facelift". They *do* tend to make a few changes to each model year to give the marketers and salespeople something new to sell. I know this leads to a stockpile of the old MY version to sell at discount prices. I never said it made complete sense, but then I'm not in tha planning department of GM.
Of course I am referring to GM/Vauxhall. I know full well that Lotus can't afford to make changes every year, but that is irrelevant in this case.

Well it does. Our *old* registration number scheme fitted nicely into the manufacturers' model years, so that if one goes and buys a new car in August 1992 to get a K plate you would also have the option of buying the 1993 model year version at list price (more or less), which may only have different seat cloth options, or the "old" 1992 MY version at a discount.
Unless it is a safety issue requiring a recall, manufacturers like GM really DO save all their changes for a new model year, which is totally artificial. Of course in 1998 we changed to a 6 month system, so that the autumn plate change happens a month later in September. This strangely means that there are a twelfth more R plate cars than previous letters, and three different cars sold in 1999 could have S, T or V plates and be any of 1998, 1999 or 2000 MY cars.
Have a look at Haynes manuals: they refer to a car my its model year. So do the manufacturers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dean Dark ( snipped-for-privacy@comcast.notthis.net) gurgled happily, sounding much like they were saying :

For US models from US manufacturers, maybe. Outside the US? No.

Non-US VINs don't have a date coded into them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Right, let me quote a post of mine:
"Because we don't refer to it by year. Get over it."
That was in response to:

Meaning, for the cerebrally challenged (that's "thick", boys and girls), that we don't refer to different models by "model year", we use words, or recognise model designators, along with the word "facelift" for noticeable facelifts. Mainly because a year can often be ambiguous. If a new model came out in June, some people would get confused. Also, because it would just sound daft to describe a 1993 car as a "1988 model year" car.

I'll have a go at this too. Let's say the car's a BMW 5-series. It'd be an E34 (one might use the word "late model" as it'd be near the end of the run), first registered in 2005.
--
"For want of the price of tea and a slice, the old man died."



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.