New 1976 Owner with Limited Skills

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Thanks...would this be what I need?
"1976 Passenger Car Shop Manual Set"
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On Fri, 7 Dec 2007 07:04:45 -0800 (PST), 1976VetteGuy

it would appear so. Thats what I see when I go to the site and run the lookup. I've bought some manauals from them in the past but they were for newer model vehicles.
I would get the GM shop manual from Helms, and it might be worth you while to do some searches on Ebay for corvetter specific GM shop manauals.
The GM shop manual would certainly be very helpful. They are not hard to use and are very well written and illustrated fairly well. Take it from me, some of the other manuals are just plain garbage.
I believe you can subscribe to Alldata and maybe other sources for shop manuals "on-line" but that might get a little expensive for a @home mechanic.
Any GM vehicle I own or want to know more about in regard to repairs....the GM shop manual is the best source for information. ----------- Elbert snipped-for-privacy@me.com
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1976VetteGuy wrote:

Yes. P/N ST32976K $ 75 from Helm (probably a Xerox copy of the original.) Includes several other Chevrolet models.
I'd not throw stones at adding a Chilton or Haynes to your library shelf after you get the factory manual. Sometimes those books will have a shortcut that may be helpful to someone who hasn't been through formal factory training or isn't too experienced. Sometimes Haynes will have a procedure that avoids use of a special tool.
Example: On the C4, the factory manual procedure for removing the fuel pump is an involved project. The Haynes manual makes the job easier and quicker.
-- pj
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http://www.ncrs.org/store/shop.cgi/page .Library.htm/SID97050020.23908 (look about halfway down the page)
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Are you talking about this thing?
"1966-82 Corvette Shop Manual"
If so...I bought it and it sucks...
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1976VetteGuy wrote:

Then buy the GM chassis service manuals (but the '74 base manual is out of print, so you'll need to find a used one). http://www.antiqbook.com/boox/nort/625a5689.shtml http://www.biblio.com/details.php?dcx 721582&aid=frg http://www.rarenonfiction.com/?page=shop/browse&category_id `
You are probably not going to find one perfect book that covers everything you'll ever want to know, specific to only your year.
I don't have the one that claims to have excerpts from the GM manuals that cover "full maintenance, repair, troubleshooting and tune-up information" It sounds good... so help educate the rest of us: why/how does it suck?
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OK...so I've figured out that the hoses running into the heater core aren't hot when the engine is at temp. So there's a flow issue somewhere. I also noticed that the hose running from the engine block, I believe, goes into the A/C box and is attached by a vacuum actuator valve that appears to have the vacuum line cut. Is it typical to have this valve in the line, and if so, where can I trace to where the hose should go to supply the vacuum? Will this cause the flow problem to the system? Last question...what causes the actuation to happen to the valve in the water loop?
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What's the temperature gauge read?
1976VetteGuy wrote:

--
snipped-for-privacy@wahoo.org

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The temperature guage reads pretty low. It barely creeps up, but I don't even know if it works or not...
This group rocks!
Thanks to everyone so far...good stuff!
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VetteGuy: Actually I am betting that the heater has been bypassed ... Honestly these cars do not get driven in cold weather much anymore and can get really "warm" inside in the summer... so many ...if not most.. owners bypass the heater..
BUT ... I would check out the C3 registry (www.c3vr.com) and take a free ride for a month or pay all of 10 bucks for a years membership...
Honestly it is the absolute best source of info(AND FREE ADVICE) on 68-82 Corvettes ..I own 3 C's and am a LIFETIME menber ONLY because everytime I had a problem I GOT ANSWERS...
Enjoy the car.... and BTW...they are very simple to work on... mo high teck computers ...only real problem that the very first step to do any repair usually is DISMANTLE THE ENTIRE CAR... LOL
Seriousl check out the registry...its full of forums that deal with everything from electrical to mechanical problems.. I did not drop the money to become a lifetime menber just for the fun of it...I got so much help with my first C3 that I saved lots of Time BUT also lots of money...
Bob G. 64 72 & 98 Convertibles 76 & 79 Coupes...
=========================== On Tue, 27 Nov 2007 06:30:45 -0800 (PST), 1976VetteGuy

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Well it may be as simple as manual heater control valve that's in line on the heater hoses. You turn it off in the summer and on in the winter. Whomever designed the nice heater setup on the 70's GM products needs to go back to school, I'm sure that person is most likely not around any more. My 78 Z28 pumped hot air into the car in the summer when the A/c was not on. I finally got tired of that and installed the above referenced manual heater control valve. I don't believe that the camaros or corvettes had a vaccum or other type heater control valve on the heater hoses during the late 70's.
(1) check to see that the heater hoses are connected to the firewall, there are two.
(2) check coolant level to make sure car is full.
(3) let engine run and get to operating temperature (what is that temp?)
(4) check to see if both heater hoses at the fire wall are hot...after engine runs a while.
(5) check to see if previous owner installed a manual heater control valve or "by-passed" the heater core.
(6) if all good above....then look for issues with the A/C -heater control head, broken cables, broken temp door, etc. I'm not sure on that model but it may have vaccum operated heater and A/C temp door controls, or it may be the old school pure manual setup.
You have to "have" hot coolant at the heater core....for heat, that's the first thing to verify.
On Tue, 27 Nov 2007 14:07:22 -0500, Bob G. <rg327_remove_comcast.net> wrote:

----------- Elbert snipped-for-privacy@me.com
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If the temperature gauge is reading low, you may need a new thermostat. Replace it. Costs less than $20. You need the engine to be at working temperature before you'll get any heat.
1976VetteGuy wrote:

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On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 12:36:22 -0800 (PST), 1976VetteGuy

Do three things. No particular order.
1. Find your local Corvette Club. They're everywhere ask the local Chevy dealers. A lot of them meet there.
2. Buy a Chiltons or similar.
3. Get a decent entry level set of tools, I suggest Sears on that one.
--

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