Replace or rebuild parts after 20+ yrs sit?

1) What is the current wisdom on dealing with carb, fuel pump, master cylinder, etc. after long sit? Should items with gaskets, seals, etc. be replaced or kitted if available?
2) Should I consider replacing the rubber cushions in the frame and body mounts if they appear to be intact, or should I wait until I get it back on the road and see how it handles and sounds? The 63 roadster was in my dark, enclosed garage under a car cover so the car was exposed to low-humidity air temperatures only. 3) What is the best process for cleaning out the fuel tank(after removal), fuel lines, and brake lines? Thanx for any genuine knowledge or ideas you care to share. Please save any moronic ideas for your next family re-union- Lib
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It depends a lot of your goals and desires for the car.
However, from a restoration/preservation standpoint, getting rid of the original equipment is a very expensive mistake.
An original '63 carb restored so you can bolt it on and go will run from $400 to $600. Not associated with JLA Enterprises - posted on alt.autos.corvette
Removing original items and replacing with non-numbered, non-correct parts lowers the resale value considerably. I saw a '64 all original, unmolested coupe that looked like junk from sitting for over 25 years sell for nearly $40,000 recently because it was all original.
Compare that to ones that are nice but incorrect that sell less than that. When you figure that a restoration on the '64 to make it nice will run another $20,000 - $30,000, you see that having it all original is a big difference than tossing original old non-working items in a quick fix for the aftermarket replacement.
Not associated with JLA Enterprises - posted on alt.autos.corvette As to bushings and such, they may not be in as bad of shape as you think. Make it run, drive it to see, and then decide. Much of that can be labor intensive and end up causing you grief and sale of the car before you finish. Seen it many times. The step is "well, if I have to take this apart, then I should also do this while here ... " and finally you have the whole car apart. As a friend once said, you can take the whole car apart in 5 days, but it will take 5 years to put it back.
Old brake lines, fuel lines, and brake hoses are usually junk. If the brake lines have rusted, it is best to replace with custom fitted lines from a Corvette vendor. Unfortunately, they are often quite hard to replace with the body still on the frame. However, in your situation, they may have survived. Replace the brake hoses and see how the lines are.

on
dark,
air
re-union-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My goal for the car is to put it back in the same condition it was when stored. At that time, I could turn the key and drive anywhere I desired, without wondering if it would make it without a mechanical failure. It only has approx. 96K miles and totally reliable. That feeling was one of the great pleasures of owning and driving this car.I am not interested in a "frame-off restoration", as I have no intention of selling it, today. I suppose if any of the original parts are not salvageable, I can replace them and save them for the next owner, who may be interested in restoration. Thanx for the input- Lib
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ANYTHING you replace SAVE the old part, no matter how insignificant it might seem, including things as minute as screws and washers..
lib wrote:

--
Ric Seyler
Online Racing: RicSeyler
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.