1969 Dodge Charger - Bo Duke tries again

cbs2.com http://snipurl.com/1l8vs
The one-time star of the "Dukes of Hazzard" TV series says he won't get fooled again when he puts his...1969 Dodge Charger called the "General
Lee" back up for sale on eBay [auction page: http://snipurl.com/Dukes_General_Lee ]
John Schneider, who played Bo Duke on the 1970's ABC television series, said only bidders with pre-qualified lines of credit will be allowed to bid on his vehicle, which he built after the show went into syndication several decades ago.
[A previous] winning bid of $10 million turned out to come from an eBay account that had been hacked, and the supposed winning bidder had no intention to buy the car.
Schneider's spokesman said 17 potential bidders have qualified to bid on the collectible car... =========Starting bid is $1 million http://snipurl.com/Dukes_General_Lee
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wrote:

No, it's $100,000
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On Mon, 21 May 2007 02:18:26 +0200, HOD

    OK, but what about the bidders that were bidding against that bidder? Why didn't the secord or third place bidders get it then? Something still fishy, I suspect. See: http://offer.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewBids&item%0108256198
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As I understand it, the second place bidder is OFFERED the car if the winner renegs, but isn't obligated to take it.
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In article

Total failure! Only 1 bid for $100,000 - didn't even make the reserve price http://snipurl.com/Dukes_General_Lee
HA!
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wrote:

Ha? What are you saying? If I was able to get $100K for that I'd be jumping for joy. It's just a kit car, reproduction. No Hemi, the suspension and everything else isn't original, either. And it wasn't used in the original TV show.
Ted
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What the hell are you talking about? It's not a replicar, it's a '69 Charger, just not stock. That crate motor kicks hemi ass if it puts out 725hp. I hear it's worth about $150K but that's pushing it but I have no idea what work they did on the motor. They are trying to get more out of it because it is "famous", lol. You could build your own for a lot less.
On Wed, 30 May 2007 01:02:27 -0700, "Ted Mittelstaedt"

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"just not stock" That one statement says it all.
You don't understand the value of a collectible car. Once you "improve" it you destroy the value.
That crate motor kicks hemi ass if it puts

Exactly. Any idiot could take a collectible '69 Charger and destroy it by tearing all the stock stuff off and slapping on all the fancy painted aluminum. But what you end up with is a car that is worth about what you put into it for parts.
The valuable collectible cars are the factory-beefed-up '69 Chargers that have been left exactly as they were beefed up in '69. Your buying a true piece of history.
What they are auctioning off is nothing more than a fast, modern, hotrod, it is not a classic. Maybe in 30 years if people are all nostalgic for the "year 2006 D of H remake movie" then it might be worth something.
Ted
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On Wed, 30 May 2007 22:04:08 -0700, "Ted Mittelstaedt"

Actually, I do. There is more than one level of "collectible" including Hollywood memorbilia. This is clearly not a "stock" Charger restoration which is where I think you are confused.

True, any idiot can do that, but do you think that's the way they would build a movie car that was never intended to be destroyed for a jump/crash? They destroyed approximate 3 Chargers per episode of Dukes back in the day, and likely none of them were number matching classics. I recall in more than one instance the taillights were round, which indicated a 1968 Charger in some scenes. Thats when you knew they were about to jump/crash. There was usually a tough guy stuntman at the wheel, too, no powdered-butt pretty boy like Jon Schneider. He probably wouldn't even get in the passenger seat of a car some hack built.
This car could possibly have more invested in the motor/trans setup than any stock 1969 Charger is worth today.
Even bone stock the prices range from $50K to $200K+ for a Superbird which was never titled
http://www.cars-on-line.com/29680.html Being sold for about $50K

So if they dropped about $100K on a ported/polished/crate motor, it would follow my argument that this thing is worth a lot more than $50K like in the above example. It was built professionally, not by some hack. There is a difference.

Agreed, but that is not what this auction is claiming. They are trying to cash in on the movie car fame. Did you read that in the auction?

Now you are catching on. Look at what Carrol Shelby did with the AC Cobra back in the day. Those cars went for $6000 or so but are worth about $600K today. Do you think Carrol Shelby was a hack? Following your logic, he destroyed the value of those cars.
What about Steve Saleen? If you buy a Saleen Mustang from Ford, it costs a lot more than a stock Mustang GT or Cobra. Is it worthless now? I think not. Saleen Mustangs from the 60's have appreciated much more than their stock counterparts.
You may want to check out the show Musclecar on SpikeTV. Lou would help you see the light and he has worked on movie cars for the show and in real life.
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wrote:

I'm not arguing that. OK, I will admit I'm not up on the prices of race motors these days - perhaps there is a lot more labor in this one than I assumed. But, still, sounds to me like your talking 200K tops. In which case why was he even on Ebay, and not down at the track thumbtacking up pictures of his car with for sale signs on it like the rest of them are?

I understand that - but still it's kind of screwy. Part of the charm of the original Dukes of Hazzard was the idea that a bunch of backwoods hayseeds without 2 nickles to their name could doink around with a Charger and get a fast hotrod out of it.
It was the same approach that Ford, GM and Chrysler took back in the glory days of NASCAR in the 60's where they really did race real stock cars and the general public could in fact go into a dealer and if they knew what codes to spec on the order sheet, have a serious race car built for them.
Dukes could no more afford a modern $200K ported and polished race motor with an engine computer than any average Joe Public could. So emphasizing all this pro-racing hotrod stuff on the movie car - well your taking all the charm of the hayseed-made-good approach and tossing that into the crapper.
What you end up with is the image of "rich man A with toy competing against rich man B with toy" This does not a classic movie make.
If you want to see a real classic movie car, watch the car chase scene in Grindhouse; Death Proof. Tarantino ended up with the very last Grindhouse car, (the movie filming destroyed all the rest of them) and I would bet it it ever went up on Ebay it would fetch a lot more than $100K.

the
Yep - but, the D of H remake movie isn't going to be a classic movie 30 years from now. It's kind of like saying the Flintstones movie that came out a few years ago is going to be a classic someday.
Classics are either very very good or very very bad - stuff like Attack of the Killer Tomatoes, or Barbarella are in the second vein - but the D of H remake was neither very very good or very very bad.

Kept lady making toys for rich men to play with. No thanks!
Ted
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> Part of the charm of the >original Dukes of Hazzard was the idea that a bunch of backwoods >hayseeds >without 2 nickles to their name could doink around with a Charger and >get a fast hotrod out of it.
Back in the mid 70s, that was entirely possible. The car itself was 6-8 years old and not worth two nickels at the time. It would have been much better for us today if the show had destroyed a bunch of '78 Monte Carlos or some other late 70s POS, but at the time it would have been too expensive compared to dime-a-dozen old Chargers. No one really knew that they'd skyrocket in value 30 years later and that everything made after '74 would be considered crap. Don't forget over on the other network, Charlies Angels were driving Mustang IIs. Heck, I went to high school with a guy who picked up (and drove to high school) a decent condition '69 Charger R/T for a few hundred bucks in about 1978. Parts were cheap and plentiful. And "hayseeds" are often more intelligent about making things work than urbanites who merely think they're intelligent ;-) But honestly, all you have to do to make an R/T fast is put gas in it and make sure all 8 cylinders are firing.
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wrote:

I'm not arguing that. OK, I will admit I'm not up on the prices of race motors these days - perhaps there is a lot more labor in this one than I assumed. But, still, sounds to me like your talking 200K tops. In which case why was he even on Ebay, and not down at the track thumbtacking up pictures of his car with for sale signs on it like the rest of them are?

I understand that - but still it's kind of screwy. Part of the charm of the original Dukes of Hazzard was the idea that a bunch of backwoods hayseeds without 2 nickles to their name could doink around with a Charger and get a fast hotrod out of it.
It was the same approach that Ford, GM and Chrysler took back in the glory days of NASCAR in the 60's where they really did race real stock cars and the general public could in fact go into a dealer and if they knew what codes to spec on the order sheet, have a serious race car built for them.
Dukes could no more afford a modern $200K ported and polished race motor with an engine computer than any average Joe Public could. So emphasizing all this pro-racing hotrod stuff on the movie car - well your taking all the charm of the hayseed-made-good approach and tossing that into the crapper.
What you end up with is the image of "rich man A with toy competing against rich man B with toy" This does not a classic movie make.
If you want to see a real classic movie car, watch the car chase scene in Grindhouse; Death Proof. Tarantino ended up with the very last Grindhouse car, (the movie filming destroyed all the rest of them) and I would bet it it ever went up on Ebay it would fetch a lot more than $100K.

the
Yep - but, the D of H remake movie isn't going to be a classic movie 30 years from now. It's kind of like saying the Flintstones movie that came out a few years ago is going to be a classic someday.
Classics are either very very good or very very bad - stuff like Attack of the Killer Tomatoes, or Barbarella are in the second vein - but the D of H remake was neither very very good or very very bad.

Kept lady making toys for rich men to play with. No thanks!
Ted
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