Can someone explain Dodge Service Dept's to me...

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On Thu, 10 May 2007 13:04:12 -0400, "Tom Rogers"


I had HUNDREDS. And not very many diss-satisfied. I'm aware of 3 or 4 that could not be satisfied- didn't matter WHAT you did. I could have given 2 of them a new car every year for life and they wouldn't have been satisfied - so I sent them down the road (after about 5 or 6 tries)

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You are "old school" much like Glenn and that is rare now days. Good, smart, and honest mechanics that know what they are doing are a rare find. When you do find one you keep using them and recommend them to your friends.
<clare at snyder.on.ca> wrote in message wrote:

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One half hour of diagnostic time gets you a basic check out. Unfortunately, if you draw an incompetent mechanic or a thief, you will probably just get a code read. If you're lucky a bad tech will mention a pertinent TSB or recall outstanding that may fix the issue, and if you are "lucky", a bad tech will guess exactly which part you need. A good tech can find out a lot in a half hour checkout, but some problems require one hour or more to cover all of the appropriate diagnostic bases. I wouldn't like to get paid .5 to properly check out a code that requires 1 hour of work. Some techs screw the customer, and some techs screw themselves for the good of the customer. The rare lucky and good tech gets paid properly for any checkout time spent.

This is a situation that could take over one hour of combined testing (*with* the problem currently acting up) to cover torque converter shudder with test drive and scan tool, checking for proper closed loop fuel control and looking for ECM/ spark/fuel problem(s), possible scope testing in the shop or on a road test. But it sounds like the tech found that your wires were arcing. Sooo.... how did a reputable shop install Mopar wires for less than the dealer would sell them? How would they make any money on the part to cover business expenses? Every real shop gets OEM parts at a slight discount, then typically sells them at dealer list -- the same as most dealers sell them for. If they are new Mopar wires and they are arcing, perhaps there is an underlying cause, like misrouting, lean air/fuel mixture causing voltage demand to rise, chaffed wire on installation, wrong or incorrectly gapped plugs, etc...

Show the service writer what you are talking about or don't let them address this complaint. It could be engine mounts, a valve body issue, worn CV joints or side gears in the transaxle (of whatever model you have, which model is it again?) but I seriously doubt that a torque converter is causing shift shock during gear engagement.

I don't know. I fix cars for a living, I don't get into the screwing of customers. It's hard to imagine how the bad mechanics can sleep at night, but that's the way it is. You need to be assertive if you want to get your $ worth of your extended warranty. Call the Chysler 800 service hotline if need be. You also need to realize that your other 'mechanic' might not know what the hell he is doing either, and that incompetence at any price isn't a bargain.
Toyota MDT in MO
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wrote:

The most common cause of a "clunk" going into gear is an incorrectly adjusted "base idle". On today's cars it is computer controlled, but a "bad" tech can still screw it up. If the idle speed is right, the torque converter will be extremely "soft" on engagement and only "stiffen up" as the throttle is engaged. Throttle pressure will also be very low on engagement, with low apply pressures (which increase as the throttle is applied- old computers had a throttle or kickdown linkage, today the TPS tells the computer how deep your foot is into it and the computer adjusts the pressure) On Chryslers it is not uncommon for the idle air correction, or throttle bypass, whatever you want to call it, to stick (either open or closed). Stuck open you get a high base idle. You didn't mention the year and model, but another common failure, which will give you the EGR code is a cracked vacuum line from the "modulator" to the EGR diaphragm. The "modulator" is also prone to failure. Sadly, the part is only available(last I checked) with the EGR valve. Snagging one from a wreck can sometimes be the best way out (although you may well be getting another dud - unless the car is obviously collision damaged - many vehicles end up in the scrapyard because of emission related failures - at least here in Ontario.)Particularly common on Neon Twin Cams - but also common on single cams and "cloud cars".
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