Coolant/Antifreeze for Chrysler/Dodge/Plymputh

I have three Chrysler products: 2000 Town and Country, 2001 Dodge Neon R/T and 2005 Charger and the owner's manual for all three states: "use only Mopar Antifreeze/Coolant 5 years/100,00 mile formula,P/N5011764AB
or equivalent". Now my questions are: 1) Is Zerex G-05 Antifreeze/ Coolant Hybrid Organic Acid Technology (HOAT) equivalent to Mopar antifreeze and safe to be use in these cars? 2) How about Evans NPG+ waterless coolant? The last and most important question: 3) Why can I not use just water with some rust and cavity inhibitort add like Prestone additive? Since I live in Texas I don't have to be worry about frozen temperature: never lower than 40F. I know the coolant/antifreeze increase the boling point for around 50 but, for what? The normal coolant/antifreeze temperature in a car in heavy traffic is around 200F, if a car pass that limit is because something is wrong and have to be fix then why is good to increase the boiling point? I am originary from South America and I am still driving cars in Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador and in this countries automoviles use just water without problems even driving from the sea level to 20,000 feet over sea level where the water boiling point point is much lower than 212F. Julio
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I have three Chrysler products: 2000 Town and Country, 2001 Dodge Neon R/T and 2005 Charger and the owner's manual for all three states: "use only Mopar Antifreeze/Coolant 5 years/100,00 mile formula,P/N5011764AB or equivalent". Now my questions are:
1) Is Zerex G-05 Antifreeze/ Coolant Hybrid Organic Acid Technology (HOAT) equivalent to Mopar antifreeze and safe to be use in these cars?
YES
2) How about Evans NPG+ waterless coolant?
NO
The last and most important question: 3) Why can I not use just water with some rust and cavity inhibitort add like Prestone additive?
Because acids will occur and eat your engine from the inside out.
Julio
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Just me again: Can you please be more specific. Why yes and why not. For example like I mentioned before I still driving old cars in South America like a 1957 Mercury Montclair, a 1970 Hillman (English car with pentastar Chrysler logo) and a 1972 Datsun and all of these use just water for cooling purposes with some anti rust additive. If acid is the problem why it do not affect these cars? I have seen these engines inside and all the water passages where relative clean .Some time I had some crust easy removed with pressure sand. What acids are you talking about? Another concern: water transfer heat much much better than any cooling/antifreeze in the market that is why so many racers cars use water. Then once again: why cooling/antifreeze in american cars in not freezing time and/or places? Is there somebody who can answer my questions with a litle more than a yes or not? Thanks, Julio Coasty wrote:

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While it's true that the overall coolant temperature may only be 200 degrees or a bit more, the temperature will be much higher in the actual water jackets in the block and heads. You don't want the coolant boiling in those areas, causing uneven cooling and coolant loss. This is especially true in modern engines which produce more horsepower per liter than ever before, and are manufactured with more efficient use of materials (thinwall designs) and increasing use of aluminum. You need a high temperature coolant to protect the engine.
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Thanks Marcus, I just started understandig. By the way, any idea why Evans NPG+ waterless coolant is not good for Chrysler?
Marcus wrote:

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It's not advisable to use water in ANY of todays cars. Todays radiators to a remarkable job, but they are for the most plastic they DO NOT tolorate steam pockets that would be caused by water or even a low coolant level. It weakens the plastic tanks
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Don't know about the part #'s you mention,but do not mix regular anrifreeze and the long life stuff. It will jell in your cooling system, then you will have real problems. The thermostat opens at 200. The motor may get hotter than this. An engine runs more efficient at higher temperatures, up to a limit.
I have three Chrysler products: 2000 Town and Country, 2001 Dodge Neon R/T and 2005 Charger and the owner's manual for all three states: "use only Mopar Antifreeze/Coolant 5 years/100,00 mile formula,P/N5011764AB or equivalent". Now my questions are: 1) Is Zerex G-05 Antifreeze/ Coolant Hybrid Organic Acid Technology (HOAT) equivalent to Mopar antifreeze and safe to be use in these cars? 2) How about Evans NPG+ waterless coolant? The last and most important question: 3) Why can I not use just water with some rust and cavity inhibitort add like Prestone additive? Since I live in Texas I don't have to be worry about frozen temperature: never lower than 40F. I know the coolant/antifreeze increase the boling point for around 50 but, for what? The normal coolant/antifreeze temperature in a car in heavy traffic is around 200F, if a car pass that limit is because something is wrong and have to be fix then why is good to increase the boiling point? I am originary from South America and I am still driving cars in Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador and in this countries automoviles use just water without problems even driving from the sea level to 20,000 feet over sea level where the water boiling point point is much lower than 212F. Julio
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