Lug nut stuck on lug - I'm up the creek.

I was changing my wheels from the oversize ones that came with my truck (bought it used) to normal size wheels. I've changed 3 tires, but 1 I can't get off because one of the 8 "lug nuts" is stuck on the
lug.
The oversize tire's "lug nuts" use a special adapter that goes inside the "lug nut" (American Racing wheels) to turn it off the "lug".
The problem is worse because it is not only stuck, but now the "lug nut" has cracked, so the adapter turns freely inside.
What are my options?
Can I drill it out? Anything to watch out for?
Would a tap help also?
Can I drill all the way through the bolt? Then what?
This is on the driver side rear wheel, will I damage the brakes?
Maybe I need an arc welder to just burn the lug and bolt off?
Sorry for all the questions, but I going crazy over this.
Please post reply.
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Get a good cobalt drill bit, 7/16 should do it, and drill out the stud from the nut. Then, when you have the wheel off, punch out the remainder of the stud and pull in a new one. Might need to drill out larger than 7/16" depending on the stud. I found 7/16 was perfect on 1/2" studs. Works OK on 12mm as well. Had to do my daughter's Neon - it is a good way to avoid damaging a mag wheel.
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snipped-for-privacy@sny.der.on.ca wrote:

Drilling it will take alot of time even if it works because these are security locks and material is hardened and so are the wheel studs. I usually take a 1/2" piece of round steel stock and place it against the lug at an angle, and use a BFH to smack it back and forth a little until it snaps off, wheel studs are easily replaceable. You can hit the stud directly if you have room. You might want to protect the wheel by taping cloth to it.--J
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It's a truck wheel on a 1996 Ram 2500, if that matters. The wheel bolts are big, old, and rusted.
I did hit it with a hammer (maybe not hard enough) to try and break it, no luck.
I started drilling out the bolt (you can access it through the lugn ut), I drill out most of it, but not all of the bolt...but I need a stronger drill :(
I will protect the wheel and try hitting it with my sled hammer tomorrow. With the hole I drilled, I thought the thing would snap off also, but no luck.
Thanks for your reply.
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On Thu, 08 Dec 2005 01:14:22 GMT, "Wrench007 via CarKB.com"

With a "good cobalt bit" it takes less than 5 minutes. Including getting the drill out of the box, chucking the bit, and drilling it out.You want to use a slow running drill motor, and a fair amount of pressure to keep the bit cutting. Do not overspeed or let the bit "slide", which just heats things up, making the metal harder.
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preferred method for me--J
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JB wrote:

================================ Dremel tool, cutoff wheel, and cold chisel.
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On Thu, 08 Dec 2005 08:46:25 -0800, Helpful G

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Buy a locking lug removal tool. It is a socket that gets driven over the lug nut and then you remove them. Just make sure it is driven on HARD so the teeth grab good.
http://www.autobarn.net/emlugnutrem.html
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6" pipe wrench with a cheater always works.
Coasty
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save yourself alot of time and money and stay away from drilling it out. you will break the bit and be pissed off.

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so what's your suggestion for him ?

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Drilling it will take alot of time even if it works because these are security locks and material is hardened and so are the wheel studs. I usually take a 1/2" piece of round steel stock and place it against the lug at an angle, and use a BFH to smack it back and forth a little until it snaps off, wheel studs are easily replaceable. You can hit the stud directly if you have room. You might want to protect the wheel by taping cloth to it.--J
......just like wrench said.
or just pein the damn thing till it is loose.
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This situation may call for the little-known, not often used, unusual and uncommon practice of "Sacrifice to the Craftsman Socket God." ...
First, spray the socket down with Lock-Ease or nut loosener and let it sit for no less than 10 minutes... spray it again and wait another 10 minutes. Then...
Get yourself a Sears Craftsman socket that is "just a little too small" for the nut and hammer that puppy nice and tight ALL the way down onto the nut you wish to remove. You may or may not crack the socket.
Attach a ratchet or breaker bar to the impaled socket and remove the nut. Return the socket to Sears for another one if you break the socket. I've only broken one Craftsman socket like this because mostly it's the nut that's "gives up" first. Craftsman sockets are tough.
Do NOT use a cheap Taiwanese or Chinese socket - use a Craftsman.
Try different undersize Craftsman sockets if necessary. Trust me... eventually, the nut WILL come off. Sacrifice as many Craftsman sockets in both metric and ASE sizes as required. Return as many sockets to Sears as necessary.
After you've removed the nut (and you WILL remove the nut), put the socket into a vise and drive the nut out with bar steel and a hammer. This has worked for me countless times on jobs that would have been impossible to do otherwise... good luck!
--
HeadlessHorseman

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Try here: http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid 952162000&subcat=Bolt-Out%2C+Taps+%26+Dies

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