overfilled the DODGE 2003 GRAND CARAVAN during oil change

Page 2 of 3  
BTW,
I was the original poster. and after a few days, I took it to WALMART and got the oil changed for 18$. As I did not have the time/energy to try to drain out accurately I quart.
My van works fine, I hope so.
I think I drove only 20-30 miles with the extra quart... I hope I did not cause any damage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@registerednurses.com wrote:

an overfill on the dipstick after changing oil and filter. I add the exact amount specified in the manual and it always looks overfilled. I've noticed the same thing on several cars I've owned and never had a problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don in San Antonio wrote:

Hi...
Does it still check over-full after running it long enough to fill the filter?
Take care.
Ken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| > Are you sure you had an extra quart in the crankcase? I typically see | > an overfill on the dipstick after changing oil and filter. I add the | > exact amount specified in the manual and it always looks overfilled. | > I've noticed the same thing on several cars I've owned and never had a | > problem. | | Hi... | Does it still check over-full after running it long enough to fill | the filter? | Take care. | Ken
Good question Ken . Yes it does. I always start the engine and run it for a few minutes at idle just to make sure there are no leaks. Then I check the old level and it usually reads high by at least a half quart, maybe more. I don't even wait for oil to drain back into the crankcase, I just check the level to make sure it's okay and I didn't do something stupid. I like to see the nice clean oil on the dip stick. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 06 Jan 2007 18:54:51 -0600, Don in San Antonio wrote:

OH. That explains a lot!
The sloshing oil is climbing up the dipstick! Check the oil with the engine cold, before you start it. Then you'll get an accurate reading of what is in the crankcase!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| > Good question Ken . Yes it does. I always start the engine and run it | > for a few minutes at idle just to make sure there are no leaks. Then I | > check the old level and it usually reads high by at least a half quart, | > maybe more. I don't even wait for oil to drain back into the crankcase, I | > just check the level to make sure it's okay and I didn't do something | > stupid. I like to see the nice clean oil on the dip stick. :-) | | | OH. That explains a lot! | | The sloshing oil is climbing up the dipstick! Check the oil with the | engine cold, before you start it. Then you'll get an accurate reading of | what is in the crankcase! | I really don't think there is any "sloshing oil" after the engine has stopped. Waiting a few minutes might give a more accurate reading, but waiting until the engine is cold is unnecessary.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 13 Jan 2007 15:16:50 -0600, Don in San Antonio wrote:

Yeah, that too.
But as far as sloshing oil, the bottom end of the piston rods are bathed in oil, so some splashing does occur...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

errr, "after the engine has stopped.."?
When you say "bathed", you do mean pressure fed, don't you?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 14 Jan 2007 10:53:34 -0800, cavedweller wrote:

I dunno...I drive Toyotas, mostly. AFAIK, the bottom of the piston rods sit in the oil.
I was thinking about this suject today, and I remembered back when I was in my 20's (um, this was just a *few* years ago... ;)
A girl came up to a friend and I and said her car wouldn't start. She had an early 70's Mustang, a "Secretary Special", with a 6 cyl. You could here the solenoid actuating, everything seemed OK, but it just wouldn't crank. The other guy with me for some unknown reason pulled the dipstick, I guess to see if there was enough oil and trying to judge if the pistons had seized.
There was oil, alright! All the way up the spout! He asked her how so much oil got in the engine, and she said, "I dunno...I just have them put a quart in every time I get gas"...!
She thought cars burned oil as well as gas, and thought you had to add oil every time you added gas. We went back to my car and got my wrenches, and drained a quart...then another...then another...about 5 quarts. When it finally got to the FULL mark on the dipstick, we had her try it and the car started right up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

Likely not when the engine is running and the pump is feeding oil to the lube system. (or when the crankcase is overfull) In operation, "oiling" for the rod bearings is accomplished by pressure feed.via the cross drilled holes in the crankshaft journals.

Now that's a good one. I can just see the head of oil all the way back up to the top end!! So now we come back to visualizing a crankcase SO full that on cranking the pistons have nowhere to go on the BOTTOM and generate a hydrostatic lock. Hilarious!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Jan 2007 06:52:05 -0800, cavedweller wrote:

We thought it was, too...we also showed her how to read a dipstick...
Crude comments removed! ;P
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But wasn't that a thread about oil?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Jan 2007 23:53:43 +0000, Noozer wrote:

<GROAN...>
Good one...good one!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

Not unless the engine is over-filled! Only lawnmower engines and other "splash" oiled engines dip the conrods into the oil.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 06 Jan 2007 07:52:20 -0800, cheerful wrote:

Was that all? An extra quart? I thought it was more than that!
I fill my Toyotas (and my GR Vger when I had it) with the proper amount of oil, less one-half quart; then I put in a quart of Marvel Mystery Oil. No probs, until I did this on the Honda (same one with the blown engine...I started doing my own oil changes after that!) and the car wouldn't start! 1/2 Quart over? Maybe it has something to do with the way Hondas move oil...?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B. wrote:

I suspect if you put enough oil in most engines and rev. them high enough some seal or gasket will let loose from dynamic localized pressure (I just snuck the word gasket in there). :)
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Steve B." wrote:

Seems to me that if you filled an engine right up to the top and started it up there would be some increase of pressure. I have never actually tried filling an engine until it was full, but I would be extremely surprised if all the oil stayed contained inside the engine when it was started up.

But that is not what he said happened. He said he got a new engine and that the service rep explained that Hydraulic Lock was the cause of the engine failure. This sounds believable (why would they lie). What he probably got confused about is what valve was involved. It probably wasn't the engine valves but the PCV valve that caused the failure. I can imagine, under the circumstances described, a geyser of oil being sucked into the engine thru the PCV valve.
-jim

-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There is nothing accurate in this post... The oil pump is sucking oil out of the oil pan which is essentially a bucket. The oil pump has no idea if there is 1 quart of oil in that bucket or 300 gallons of oil in that bucket. The problem with overfilling is that the spinning crankshaft comes in contact with the oil. The whipping action of the crankshaft will aerate the oil and turn it in to a foamy froth. The oil pump can not pump this froth so you loose oil pressure and soon after loose an engine if you don't stop.
Valve seals are not exposed to pressurized oil. Any lubrication needs they have are handled by oil splashing off the other valve train components.
Steve B.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B. wrote:

You are correct Steve. Also, don't the oil pump have a pressure relief valve built into them so that excess pressure doesn't build up?
Hank
Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oh wow that's quite the story. Liquids can't be compressed eh? Well damn, that's just re-writing the laws of physics right there. I guess oil doesn't burn in the combustion chamber either. You learn something new every day.
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.