overfilled the DODGE 2003 GRAND CARAVAN during oil change

Page 3 of 3  
On Thu, 04 Jan 2007 18:52:42 -0500, SBlackfoot wrote:


While he's wrong about the oil "locking up" the engine, it is indeed true that liquids can't be compressed. You can put pressure on a liquid, but you can't compress it. There's a difference. That's the fundamental principle of how hydraulic systems work...
Perhaps you should have paid more attention in that high school physics class...
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan C wrote:

It's easy to get a hydrostatic lock with glycol/water...all it takes is a head gasket leak.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 04 Jan 2007 20:45:02 -0600, Dan C wrote:

He is? How? You guys keep telling me I'm wrong, but did you ever have it happen to you?
The one time I went ti Jiffy Lube, they overfilled by 3 quarts. The car started hard and the engine blew. They wanted to put in a 'remanufactured' engine, but the car was a year and a half old, so I insisted on a new engine.
Oil can't lock up an engine, huh? Sure...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 05 Jan 2007 14:32:11 +0000, Hachiroku wrote:


Nope. See below.

Perhaps it can (I won't claim to know all possible situations), but not in the manner you claimed ("leaking past the valve seals").
Is that clear enough for you?
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan C wrote:

Well, I guess IF the crankcase was just SO full of extra oil that there was absolujtely no room for the downgoing pistons to move it, then some degree of hydraulic locking MIGHT be possible. In that case, blown crank seals MIGHT be a possibility.
Hydraulic locking is usually associated with a full combustion chamber, either with fuel or with coolant or, in the case of radial engines, with oil in the bottom jug.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 05 Jan 2007 09:13:32 -0600, Dan C wrote:

Actually, what it may do is remove the air space from the pan and lock it that way. And mine was not the only case of Hydraulic Lock I have heard of from being overfilled. So, the valve seals was a guess...

And SuSE is just right. Well, except 10.2. If you're going to include all these fancy desktop tricks, you could at least make sure it works with Ati video cards...they're only currently the world's biggest Video chip maker...
I like Ubuntu....more Windows users should try it! (But that is a discussion for another group...Oh, knoppix is cool, too...saved my bacon when Windows or SuSE 9.3 has blown it's brains out!)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

damn,
doesn't
day.
High school was an awfully long time ago. ;)
As I remember it, there are three basic states of matter. Gaseous, liquid, and solid. Well four, but plasma is irrelevant here. Liquids are not easily compressed but should enough pressure be applied (definitely beyond anything occuring inside an engine) but there is a compression factor. Why do you think there are specific hydraulic oils?
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 06 Jan 2007 02:23:06 -0500, SBlackfoot wrote:


There are diffferent hydraulic oils for several reasons, but the amount of compression each exhibits is a very minor (at best) factor. It's more a matter of temperature tolerance/stability and lubrication requirements. But anyway..., for all intents and purposes (and certainly in the context of *this* discussion), the fact remains that liguids are not compressable. We are, after all, discussing a car engine, as you said above.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

builds,
leak
doesn't
As wrong as he is about everything else, Pascal's Law - and virtually everything hydraulic - works on the very principal that liquids, in fact, CANNOT be compressed.
They can be pressurized, but NOT compressed.
OTOH - You are correct in chiding him about oil burning off in the combustion process.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you replaced the filter, but have not started the engine yet, you may be seeing the filter volume (which will go away when you start the engine).
Otherwise, if you have really overfilled it, then drain out a quart or so.
You can tolerate a little overfill with no problem, but a quart or more is too much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@registerednurses.com wrote:

Are you sure you put in too much oil? I had a Dakota that took 6 qts in the 4.7 V-8. I was the first person to change the oil and the dip stick showed that it was over full. I was positive I only put in 6 qts. with the filter. I found out the Dakota had the wrong dip stick. I never found the correct dip stick, so I just filed a notch where the FULL level was.
Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.