R134A Ports

I'm wanting to add refrigerant in my 1999 Dodge Ram 1500. I purchased a can of refrigerant at my local auto parts that included the quick release coupling for the low pressure side of the system. When I tried
to add it, I found the coupling for the can of refrigerant was too small for my port installed on my truck (I'm sure it's the low pressure port I'm trying to add it in, but for sake of argument I'm trying to add it to the port on the passenger side front just behind the radiator support). I measured my port (.552") and the coupling on the can of refrigerant (.513").
Does Dodge put on a different port than standard? Are there adapters to be had? Where? (The guy at the parts place was clueless...) It looks like the port I have will unscrew from the line, but that would require evacuating the system, and I don't have a vacuum pump. For that matter, is that the right port?
Thanks,
Dave Young
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My advise to you is if you don't know what you are doing, have someone else do it. you could cause injury to you or your truck by doing this. The ports are designed so that a low side valve cannot be installed on a high side. you are already trying to connect to the high side. if for some reason you succeeded with this..the can would have exploded in your hand.
Just a thought.
Glenn Beasley Chrysler Tech
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Glenn,
I have to admit that your answer pissed me off at first. However, it got me thinking that I'd better go double check myself. I was using a Haynes manual and it shows the connection where I described. I didn't double check. I realized then that the line I was trying to charge WAS the high pressure side. The low pressure side goes to the compressor and was hidden under the air filter snorkle.
So anyway, I tried charging it and the compressor is still not running (I bypassed the low pressure switch to keep it going).
Gotta think about plan b.
Dave
P.S. I am experienced on AC&R systems being trained in the military, but my experience was with ships with water cooled condensors and much larger systems. I have to admit my skills are a bit rusty. I also don't have the tools I used to have. I also don't like paying someone else to do work I can do.....
maxpower wrote:

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else
ports
side.
you
Sorry to get you upset, but if I think someone isn't familiar with something that could hurt themselves I normally don't reply, I have seen and heard of to many incidents where people got hurt from charging the system thru the high side and blowing up the can. The other problem I have is I haven't worked at a truck dealer for over 7 years so I couldn't tell you where the low side fitting is on that truck. And using that Haynes Manual will really get you in trouble. If you are going to be a do- it -your selfer I would highly recommend purchasing the factory books. Use the Haynes manual for a door stop only or a nice fire in the winter
Glenn
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Hmmm...now there's an idea! I bought a (Haynes or Chilton, not sure which) manual for my 92 Dodge Caravan some years ago at a yard sale or something. The two times I referred to it for help, it was useless. First was for an odd-ball little tiny corner lightbulb replacement (so it would pass VA state inspection)...it seemed to only have those details (vaguely) for pre-91 models. The other time was when the pot metal broke on the ignition lock cylinder and I was trying to figure out how to replace it...again, I recall it was only giving info on the pre-91 models. Or perhaps it just said "this thing has an air bag, don't do anything yourself." I can't remember for sure now... Aside from that, it's made for a nice dust collector!
Wesley

a
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Glenn,
Not at all...you actually got me thinking the way I should have from the beginning...so if anything I owe you an apology.
Thank you,
Dave Young

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something
of
the
the
really
for a

no apology necessary.
Glenn
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Dave Young wrote:

Playing with 134-A is not for the inexperienced. As a certified AC Tech I make a lot of money from those over the counter do-it-yourself sales. Pressures and volume are critical on 134-A. I don't even try to fill by pressure anymore. I fill by volume and watch the pressures. This isn't like the old days of R-12 and a piston compressor. They were very forgiving. 134-A and rotary compressors are not forgiving. Just a few ounces either way and you will be visiting someone like me shortly because your compressor died before it's time.
Grizz440
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