Who was it who mentioned Fram oil filters and dropping oil pressure?

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N8N wrote:


You know you could have very easily and simply made a determination about whether the filter anti drain back valve was working. I suspect you didn't know how to do that or you didn't want to do that. Instead you chose to speculate and conjecture about what was happening. There isn't much evidence in your story to go on so I can see no good reason to believe your guess about the cause is correct.
-jim
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jim wrote:

I suspect that I *did* determine that the ADBV wasn't working, and had my diagnosis confirmed by others.

That's because you're an idiot, and like so many others you choose to bloviate about topics upon which you have little first hand experience but lots of book larnin' (and much of that incorrect or poorly understood) and therefore you think you're a heck of a lot more knowledgeable than you actually are.
To recap this whole sorry thread: Fram filters *demonstrably* have several known issues, and are clearly of the cheapest construction of all the "major brand" filters you're likely to see at your FLAPS (and are at or below the quality level of most house brands for that matter.) This is not arguable, it's fact. The only real question is "is it good enough to be acceptable." I say, why take the chance when clearly better filters are available at the same price? The fact that you have continued arguing against this for over a week *proves* you're an idiot.
nate
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replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

This is correct. They came under a lot of pressure for the lack of API certification, and they came up with some fantastic excuses about it until one employee accidentally leaked the real reason for the lack of certification.
Had Amsoil simply come forward back when everyone was talking about this and explained the reasons, they would have come out of the whole thing well. Instead they made up a bunch of excuses about the cost of certification, the fear that someone would steal their formula, etc.
In reality the non-API Amsoil products are fine for vehicles without catalytic converters, and even on vehicles with catalytic converters the worst that could happen is a slightly shorter life of the converter. The high levels of ZDDP are a good thing, other than the fact the the zinc poisons the catalytic converter.
To address the warranty concerns of customers, Amsoil came out with one product line that is API approved. It's an oil similar to Mobil 1, an oil that can legally be called a synthetic in the U.S. (but not in Europe) but that is derived from petroleum base stock.
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wrote:

Pure voodoo there. Talk about espousing a premise that can't be proved.
--Vic
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That is why I stopped buying them too. As I repeat, I never had a problem with them of any kind, but swimming upstream for no reason is not productive.
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wrote:

All filters are DESIGNED to conform to manufacturer's burst pressure specs. Doesn't mean every one off the line DOES. Poor quality control can make a compliant design into a total disaster - particularly if the design is to JUST conform to the specs.

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On Sat, 05 Dec 2009 14:07:37 -0500, Nate Nagel wrote:

Really, man, I tell you, those who think they know everything annoy the hell out of us who really *DO*! ;)
I was beginning to think 'jim' was a bot...
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wrote:

No mods at all to the regulator and there WAS an AC-Delco supplied spin-on filter adapter available through GM Parts.

It was a Fram that blew off my '69 Dart slant six - but to be fair, it WAS -45 F with 20 weight oil. That was about the last Fram filter I've used. - back in 1972.

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Define quality and how it is fairly measured and then I'll get back to you. If an oil smoking car with faded paint, crumbling interior plastic, and weekly trips to the local garage qualifies as quality, then Toyota is number 1.
Just like GM, Toyota has built some real POS cars. Only the Toyota wackco believe otherwise. I have no problems with people buying Toyotas (heck, in my immedaite family, more than half the vehicles are Toyotas!), I just think all these claim of supernatural Toyota quality and reliability are a bunch of hooey. You guys have spent too much time listening to Toyota ads and reading CR. I won't argue that Ford, or GM, or... have not built some real junk - they all have, but so has Toyota. For instance - at least four times a year I have go help one of my elder neighbors with her Corolla...seems like there is always something going wrong with it (besides the faded paint, oil smoke, and crumbling plastic). This is not some high mileage ancient Toyopet. This is a Corolla, less than 10 years old, with less than 80k miles. She gets the oil changed every three months, even though she only drives it about 500 miles a month. It is not abused, no teenagers have ever driven it. It is even protected by RNC bumper stickers....
As for your question....I think a Chevrolet Silverado is a better quality vehicle than a Toyota Tundra. In fact I don't even think it is close.
Ed
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wrote:

But if it DOES, you know engine clearances or a worn out pump are NOT the issue.
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On Tue, 1 Dec 2009 06:06:11 -0800 (PST), 1 Lucky Texan

That works if the reason the oil pressure is low is that the pressure regulator is opening too soon. On some engines this is a very real problem - particularly engines with "oversized" oil pumps and/or engines run most of the time at high revs. If the pressure regulator is "in use" most of the time, the spring flexes a lot and eventually looses tension - thereby causing a lowered "maximum" pressure.
If an engine is low in pressure at low speeds, but comes up to pressure at speed, this GENERALLY will not work. The exception would be a pressure regulator that is so week or defective that it stays partly open at all times, where tightening the spring MIGHT help close the pressure bypass at idle.
I've seen sticky pressure relief valves, due to engine varnish, that would stick open on occaision - the symptoms? - low oil pressure and clattering valves at idle after high RPM running.
I've seen them fixed with Rislone, MMO, and once with a combination of an engine flush and, believe it or not, Ford Friction Modifier for differentials. That stuff gets sticky automatic transmission valves moving very well too.
The engine was NOT going to be rebuilt - so it was worth a crack. Flushing the engine with either Rislone or Bardahl 1(cann't remember which any more) cleaned the engine out pretty good, but once in a while the OP light would come on at idle and the valves would get noisy. Had some friction modifier left from another job and put it in the engine oil. After a few miles of driving the valve noise at idle went away and the oil pressure stabilised. 230 cubic inch Chevy Nova
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