Who was it who mentioned Fram oil filters and dropping oil pressure?

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Mine is not. It still runs as well today as it did in 2002 when I installed it. Which is like new I might add. No runs, no drips, no errors.. Except for when I tried to use a Fram filter and it clacked very loudly in protest. I didn't let it run long enough to hurt anything, and I never raised it off idle until I finally had pressure.

I can round you up a whole boatload of people that have seen the same exact problem. This is a well known issue involving many people. It's not something I just made up to look stylish. I don't care what the "studies" say. They are not using them in the same applications and filter positions.
There have already been two others just in this thread alone that seem to be well aware of the problem besides me. Trust me, compared to the anti drain valve on the Motorcraft filter, the ones in regular orange Fram filters suck. Period. And I've proven to myself on my own vehicle. I've never seen the problem with any other filter on that engine. Only the Fram. Many others have proven it to themselves also. It's a common topic on the Ford truck forums I hang out on. But it's also a known problem with the Mopar slant six 229's. As far as the "dropping oil pressure", I'd say starting an engine when cold and waiting extended periods of time for *any* oil pressure would qualify. It's not anything one would normally miss being as the engine will be clacking like crazy. :( Think what you want, but you will never see me using a Fram filter again, even if they do work acceptably in many other applications. Which I'm sure they probably do.. They don't work in all of them though, and the other brands do. I know which line I'll be in and it won't be the one with the big "F" up at the window. :/
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On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 12:59:47 -0800, nm5k wrote:

The filter on the Soob and the Caravan are positioned so that when you remove them, they are full of oil. Yuck!
The Supra...often the filter is dry, even if you remove it shortly after turning off the engine. Not really recommended, since for some reasone Toyota has a penchant for placing them directly below the exhaust header...
Burns to prove it! ;p
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Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

Punch a hole in the top of the can while the oil is draining from the pan; wait half an hour before removing filter.
It'll still be messy, just not *as* messy.
nate
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On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 19:10:39 -0500, Nate Nagel wrote:

The Caravan is positioned so if you have the pan placed properly, it catches the oil from the pan and the filter all at once.
The Soob...it leaks out a little, but manages to hold most of the oil in place.
The Supra? If the filter does happen to be full, you're going to get oil down the side of the block and onto the subframe...
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On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 09:28:24 -0800, larry moe 'n curly wrote:

Lee Maxifilter?!?!?!
How the hell old was this test?!?!?!
I used to use Lee Maxifilters in my Corollas. When I got the Hachiroku, for it's first oil change I went to get a Lee...GONE! I actually found one in a closet last year, but it doesn't fit anything I own. I must have bought it ~1982 or so.
If you find a Lee, let me know!!! ;)
BTW, that same test, from 1984, also said if you had a Toyota, you were getting the BEST filter made...
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On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 09:28:24 -0800, larry moe 'n curly wrote:

I'm afraid Lee filters are long gone. The last reference I could find was a magazine ad from 1986. The last one I bought was '84 or '85. I can't understand how they could go out of business. I was buying them 2-3 at a time!
I used them in my 74 Corolla, my 78 Corolla, my 80 Corolla. They were all high mileage cars, due in some part to the oil filter?
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You have to remember that the filter that will remove the smallest particles will generally be the one which has the highest resistance to flow (smallest pore sizes).
Do you have any data that accurately describes what happens when particles of various small sizes are left in the oil? I dont. I have, like you I am sure, read that they are not desirable, but have never seen HARD data.
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hls wrote:

Your not going to find research and hard data on worn out clunkers like the one in the tale that started this thread.
Buying an old car changing the oil and putting a Fram filter on it happens all the time. And it is not that uncommon for the result to be a quickly clogged filter. Been there, done that myself. Now in my opinion the thing to do when that happens is to immediately change the oil again and put another Fram filter on. Why blame the filter for just doing its job? I mean how retarded do you have to be to think the problem is with the new filter and not the old worn out engine?
-jim
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On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 18:37:33 -0600, jim wrote:

About as retarded as making a statement like the one above without reading the entire post.
If you'll look again, you'll see I didn't have that problem with the Supra with an "old, worn out engine" until I put a Fram oil filter on it. Prior to that I had been using Toyota filters, but ran out of filters on hand.
With the Toyota filters, the oil pressure had been about 1/2 mark on the gauge higher. I don't have much to go on with the Subaru, but the last oil change was done about 6 months before I bought it and it sat for 4 of those months. Oil pressure was good until I put on a Fram.
So, before you say something retarded yet again, why don't you just wait until I post an update after replacing the Soob and Caravan filters with another brand, and post the results?
I just find it funny that on three older cars, replacing the existing filter with a Fram resulted in lower oil pressures.
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"Hachiroku $B%O%A%m%/(B" wrote:

It doesn't take much to amuse a dim wit.
    You may well get higher pressure with a a filter that has less resistance. This is not unusual for any worn out engine that doesn't generate enough extra pressure to push the pressure relief valve open. That doesn't mean the other filter is better. One of the consequences of using the filters that don't filter as good is an accumulation of fines and more wear. The wear is the actual cause of the low oil pressure.
-jim
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On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 20:35:54 -0600, jim wrote:

Go away, you irritating man. Isn't there the underside of a rock just about your size?
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Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

Someone volunteer to to put two accurate oil pressure gauges on something, say a 98 Toyota Camry 4 cylinder. One before the filter, one after. The pressure differential will indicated the amount of pressure drop when the filter is new, if the relief is working when cold, and the amount of resistance as the filter clogs up and if the filter media ruptures. Also need a couple of accurate flow meter to determine volume of oil in the different flow circuits and of course a temp gauge at the entrance to the oil filter, and a recording chart or maybe a software program and laptop to record all the numbers....... then come up with the specs on what a filter should do for how long and keep the cost under 4 dollars retail. PRESTO ! You have reinvented the wheel! Or you could do like I used to do with my old 73 Chev Nova SS 6 cylinder, carry a spare filter, the oil pressure sender on that one was after the filter, when the pressure dropped with a warm engine I changed the filter. Whatever, I use Fram, they meet factory specs and do the job for my kind of driving. If you are really worried about engine life, drive easy until the engine is warmed up, then keep driving easy and you should get all the designed life from the engine and probably quite a bit more. The national debt on Nov 20, 2009 was 12,010,561,742,215.21
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Fatter Than Ever Moe wrote:

Right. but no one here is going to do a meaningful experiment. What they will rely on is the partial evidence available ( the gauge on the dash board ).
    If the engine is in good shape the fact that one filter offers slightly more resistance than another shouldn't make any noticeable difference on the dash oil pressure gauge. The pressure relief valve controls the pressure. It's only when the engine and/or oil pump is badly worn that you are going to see the effects of different filter media on the oil pressure gauge ( if the vehicle has a gauge )
-jim

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On Tue, 24 Nov 2009 07:27:50 -0600, jim wrote:

Wow! A succinct answer!
But, if you're using the guage on the dash, it doesn't matter how accurate it is. It's relative. If it's off by a few PSI, chances are it's going to be off across the spectrum.
And, no, I paid $400 for the car 2 1/2 years ago, it's rusting and I don't know if I'm going to bother with it after this year. Maybe, I like it. But it's a beater, and I want to make sure it *gets* through this winter.
I may fix it because it is kind of a fun car to drive, but it is what it is. If I can do it cheap, OK. If not, the shredder is about 2 miles down the street.
When I do the oil change, probably sooner than the 3,000 miles I usually do, because winter is creeping up, I'm trying a different filter. If the oil p comes back up, good! If not...did I mention the shredder is about 2 miles away?
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Hachiroku ???? wrote:

I took my old Nissan Van to the metal recycler a week ago. That thing lasted me well for 20 years and 200,000 miles. Last I saw, it was laying on its side next to a 40 foot high pile of scrap. Kind of sad.
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My wag (wild ass guess) is that the prior owner had motor honey in it to prop up the pressure, and if I'm right all the filter changes wont help. I sure hope I'm wrong as a lower end is a bit more $ than a filter. Ben
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On Sun, 22 Nov 2009 17:25:23 -0500, Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

OK....changed the oil in the Soob today ,a dn installed a Wix filter. Just by lokking at it it appeared to be a better made filter.
No change in oil pressure...
However that horrible clacking noise went away in about 2 minutes, after clacking for the past week. Previously, changing oil did NOT eliminate the clacking noise once it started.
Filter change do that? I don't know. I don't care. It stopped.
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On Sat, 28 Nov 2009 17:37:04 -0500, Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

Let's revise that. Not only has the clattering gone away, but there has been a noticable rise in oil pressure, esp at higher revs. Oil pressure goes much higher than it did before, and does not bottom to 0 on the gauge...
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Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

Just for completeness' sake, I ASSume the same brand/weight oil both times 'round? Or did you only top up and not change the oil?
nate
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On Mon, 30 Nov 2009 21:12:36 -0500, Nate Nagel wrote:

I have been using QS Hi-Mileage oil with Slick 50 for the past 3 oil changes, 10W30 or 10W40, depending on when it was changed.
Some say Slick 50 isn't good all the time, so this time it got Mobil Clean 5000, and since winter is coming, 10W30.
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