2003 Dodge Ram Diesel ***Need help with DTC's***

I have 11 DTC's stored in my pcm. I was able to flash them and record what they are. Now I just need someone with a service manual to tell me what
each code is. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you listed them here, along with your engine/transmission combo, you will get all the answers you need.
FMB (only on B in FMB)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok, I have a 2003 Dodge Ram Diesel, Vin#6, Automatic trans. The following DTC's are displayed in this order: 2509 0193 0118 0113 0533 2122 0251 0480 2127 2121 0073
I purchased the truck wrecked and just got it running yesterday after replacing a long list of parts in the front end. It runs a bit rough right now; I am suspecting a bad ECM also because the housing was cracked and I sealed it with silicone sealant.
Thank You.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

See inserted text above...
These are from "DieselTruckResource.Com FAQ Listing : Common FAQ - IE, ODBII, ODBIII etc. : Computer Fault Codes" @ http://www.dieseltruckresource.com/faq/faq.php?display q&nr5&catnr%&prog=1&lang=en&onlynewfaq=1 or http://tinyurl.com/bvsp6
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Most of these do not make sense; 2122, 2121 & 2127 refer to Pedal Position Sensor; this truck is not equiped with adjustable pedal. Or is it the same as the throtle position sensor.
0480 Cooling Fan 1 Control Circuit/Open (Low Speed Fan Relay); truck is not equipped with electric fan.
0533 A/C Pressure Sensor High? I have not charged the A/C system yet.
0118 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor High? 2509 ECM/PCM Power Input Signal Intermittent?
Could this be the result of a bad ECM or PCM or BCM. This truck has a Diesel engine control module as well (bolted to the side of the block, which is the one that showed a small 1/2" crack in the case).
Any more comments, thoughts?
thanks in advance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No - they refer to the outputs of the APPS - accelerator pedal position sensor.

Yes, it is. The fan clutch is electronically controlled.

Yes. First, clear all the codes out. Then run the truck for a complete drive cycle (start, warm-up, drive, cool-down, shut down), and re-check the codes.
Are there any aftermarket performance boxes on the engine?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The truck is stock. The cooling fan clutch is new, along with new timing gears, power steering pump, ac compressor; the truck was hit in the front so most front end parts, as well as front of engine and most accessories/pulleys have been replaced with new parts. How do I clear the codes? Is that something I can do without a scanner. I disconnected the batteries for a long period of time, but codes are the same. thank you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No - you need an OBD-II scan tool to clear the codes. Interesting that most, if not all, of the problems the codes refer to are components you've replaced. I think you'll find that once you clear the codes out, most will not return.
Did you check the wiring to the APPS, or check whether the APPS module was damaged any? It's on the front driver's side of the engine, underneath the black plastic cover (rounded on the front).
Timing gears? There are no timing gears, per se. The crank gear drives the cam gear directly. Are you sure these were aligned correctly? What about the tone ring and crank position sensor? The alignment of the sensor to the tone wheel is critical, and if it got whacked in the wreck, could be at least part of the cause of your rough running.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I guess the first thing to do is to clear the codes. The APPS was not damaged at all, nor was it ever disconnected, it might be a damaged wire to or from the sensor. Also, the timing gears were aligned correctly, following the marks. What is the tone ring, is that the somewhat thin plate (with teeth) that mounts behind the harmonic balancer? The crank sensor was replaced but there seems to be no adjustment possible, it just slips in the round hole of the aluminum timing case (replaced) and held in place by one screw. How do you align it? You may email me directly at: snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net, so we can discuss this further, if you would not mind. Thank You. John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's it

Well, as you noted, there's not much of an alignment possible. I was saying that if the mount was bent at all, that the timing could be altered. You really can't see this without a DRB3 scan tool (as Dodge re-programmed the Cummins ECM, so normal Cummins diagnostic tools won't work with it - gotta be the in-house scan tool).
Especially with the new common-rail engines, it can be very difficult to troubleshoot a problem without the proper electronic diagnostic tools - since hardly anything is mechanically controlled anymore. Fuel pressure is controlled electronically, injection timing and duration are both electronically controlled - about the only thing that's still mechanical is the valve timing.
Can you describe how it runs? You said it runs rough.... does it idle rough, but smooth out with throttle? Any smoke on start-up/run? Another common cause of a rough idle is a failed injector, and the way it's usually tested is by disabling each injector, in sequence, with the DRB3. When you diable the bad one, the engine idle doesn't change - whereas disabling a working injector will cause a stumble/rougher running. This isn't (easily) doable otherwise, as you only have three injector connectors - with each connector serving two injectors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It starts fine at first and idles well, after about 10 seconds it starts to misfire, but there is no pattern to it. It's not like it has a constant bad injector. It's more like intermittent. Not familiar with Diesel engines, I've only worked on gas engines for about 15 years so I have a good understanding of misfiring engines. Upon light pressure to the throtle, then it seems to misfire, correct itself, misfire again and so on until it's returned to idle, but again there is no apparent pattern. Sort of like running on 5 cyls. but having a child turn off one cyl. when he feels like it. I just came back from running it again, and it had a constant misfire, more noticeable in gear, so I thought for sure I had no compression in one cylinder. Then I shut it off, and started it again, and it ran fine for a little while until it began it's sporadic attitude again. At least, I know there is nothing internal wrong with it. The problem must be, like you said, electronically controlled. I don't see any electrical connection at each injector. How is the injector timing controlled. On a gas engine, there are two leads at each injector. But on this one, the only thing I see is the fuel line, coming out of the rail that goes to each injector. Please explain further. Thank You again in advance. John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

On the outside of the engine, driver's side, just under the valve cover, there are three gray, square, 4-pin connectors. Each of these connectors contains the wiring for two injectors. If you were to remove the valve cover, you'd see the electrical wires running from these connectors to each of the six injectors - two wires per injector.
Timing is controlled by the ECM, based on inputs from the crank sensor, cam sensor, MAP sensor, APPS sensor, as well as others. Being a common-rail engine, there is fuel pressure at each injector at all times (just like an FI system on a gas engine - only about 100 to 500 times the pressure). The ECM supplies voltage to the injector, which causes it to open up, and lets the fuel spray. Again - very similar to a gas fuel injector.
If you have a non-contact infrared thermometer, you can possibly read a temp. differential on the exhaust manifold at each port after running it for a while - this might help you narrow down the injector that isn't firing (if that's in fact the problem).
And speaking of sensors - here's another thought. Since you said you had to replace lots of front-end stuff, what about the IAT/P (Intake Air Temp./Pressure) sensor located on the intake tube just after the air filter? None of your codes that you listed pointed to that sensor, but many people, when changing out intakes, fail to hook this back up, and the truck runs like crap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
nojodas67 wrote:

http://tinyurl.com/a9qcr
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.