2004 Ram - Cummins - Funky smell

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Hi all,
This is my first diesel, so pardon me if this is considered "normal" behavior for my truck. First ... it's a 2004 Ram with the 305/555
Cummins engine. 4wd, automatic.
I just purchased two Seadoos with a double trailer. Total weight is approximately 2500 lbs. I pulled them from Lake Ozark, MO to Dallas, TX last weekend with absolutely no trouble. In fact, I pulled them in overdrive all of the way and the tranny never hunted one time.
I dropped them off to be serviced and picked them back up last night. I was backing them into my storage facility, which is a complete bitch to do.
Firstly, I am backing them uphill around a corner. I had to start straightening out, at which point I have to ride up on a curb with my driver front tire. RPM's were up pretty good to accomplish this.
I finally got everything where it should be and I smelled a burning smell. Smelled like hot oil.
I glanced at my temp gauge and it was up a little higher and usual ... just over the halfway mark, > 200.
I unhooked the trailer and went for a spin down the road to cool things back down.
My question is, what was burning? The tranny?
Craig C.
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Most likely.
......

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It might have been. Backing up can send the trans temp right off the scale. Try useing low range if possible next time.
Roy

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Maybe it was something as simple as he was back up a hill, and some oil went out the blow-by tube getting on the exhaust?

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The older Dodge automatics did have a problem overheating in reverse. Don't know about the newer ones.
Al 2004 CTD, six speed, 4X4.
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Jay wrote:

oil went

I thought that perhaps that was it, but unless I am mistaken, the new common rail engine has a redesigned blow-by system, where the oil gets recycled back into the oil pan. That being the case, is there still a way for it leak out?
I had a hard time making up my mind on whether to get a manual or auto. Since I pull boat/pwc, given this stinky situation, me thinks I should have opted for the six speed. However, it sure is nice having that auto in Dallas Central Expressway (75) traffic ...
Craig C.
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There is. There's a black plastic tube, about 3/4" OD or so, sticking down from the engine. This is the vent tube for anything that the "new-and-improved" blowby system misses. Mine emits a fine mist from time to time. Not enough to drip on the the ground, but enough to ensure nothing in it's vicinity will ever suffer from surface rust :)
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down
nothing
But that is considered a feature, not a problem :-)
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving



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Craig,
I have an 04 six speed. Driving around empty it's a pain in the butt. An automatic would have been a much better choice if that was all I did. I tow a race car all over the place and just didn't trust the automatic. An automatic would have been a hell of a lot easier to find too. Had to go 1500 miles to buy mine.
Al
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Blow by oil on the exhaust? I do not think so. Wrong side of the engine. Face it, the smell resulted from a hot autotrans. I installed a BD "2 Low kit" on mine. This allows me to engage the low range on the transfer case without engaging the 4 wheel drive (front axle.) This allows for sharp "all the way over" turns wihtout front axle u-joint hop or binding. Using this feature I can reverse under heavy load without getting the trans too hot.

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Right - but this isn't possible on an '04 (or an '03, for that matter)... no more CAD.
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Tom Lawrence wrote:

For those of us with older trucks this can be done easily with inexpensive parts. For the how-to see: http://www.vtlink.net/users/joespond/media/miker2x4lo.htm
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Please bring me up to date here, Tom. What is a "CAD"?

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Central Axle Disconnect. The passenger-side axle is actually in two pieces, and inner and outer section. The CAD is a device that slides a locking collar to couple the two shafts together, or disconnect them. When disconnected, the passenger front wheel/hub just spins the outer shaft. The driver's side wheel/hub spins the left axle shaft, which in turn spins the side and spider gears of the front differential, but the front driveshaft isn't spinning. The operation of the CAD, in stock configuration, is controlled via engine vacuum, switched through a vacuum switch in the transfer case. When shifted into 4WD (either high or low), vacuum is applied to the CAD motor, which makes the collar move, and the front axle engages.
The 2WD low conversions separate the transfer case and front axle operations, so that you can engage the transfer case into low range, but leave the front axle disconnected, leaving your vehicle in 2WD. In this operation, the front driveshaft is turning along with the rear driveshaft, but since the passenger-side axle isn't connected, you can make sharp turns without binding up the driveline. This isn't an option on the 3rd gen trucks, becuase their front axles are solid one-piece units, and therefore always engaged.
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Tom, thanks for the very detailed and clear explanation on "CAD".

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gen
therefore
Other than finding a different storage facility, where I don't have to reverse uphill while jumping a curb, what would be my option? I was really hoping for a solution like the one you responded to ...
I guess I could always keep going like I am and let the extended warranty take care of the damage this will cause over time. :)
Craig C.
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Well, you could remove your front driveshaft... :)
In all probability, you aren't hurting your transmission. Since you seem to tow frequently, I'd put in a transmission temperature gauge, and make sure I didn't run it up much over 180F while hauling, and not over 200-210F when backing up. They're easy enough to put in, and run about $45 (not including the mount - of which there are plenty of options). At least this will eliminate the guessing.
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seem to

sure I

200-210F when

including
will
I'll take a gander at the available gauges. As a side note, I looked up, yesterday, what all would be involved in changing the fuel filter since it is time for me to do it. Many different posts about it ... all of which seemed awfully over-complicated.
Perhaps I did something wrong, but it took me about 3 minutes. Drained a bit of fuel out, (about 3 tablespoons), unscrewed the top, pulled out the old filter, removed the old gasket, put on the new filter and gasket, screwed it back together, bumped the stater and started the truck. All done.
Did I miss something? :)
Changed the air filter too. Seems to be more responsive this morning.
Craig C.
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One of the easiest things to do.... I don't know why some people complicate it, either...

As long as you remembered to lube the new O-ring with a little diesel fuel, nope - you didn't miss a thing. Can you believe some people charge over $100 to do that?
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Tom Lawrence wrote:

Actually, I used motor oil instead of diesel.
For your viewing pleasure:
http://homepage.mac.com/mcraigchr/PhotoAlbum34.html
(it's pics of my truck ... get your mind out of the gutter).
;) Craig C.
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