2005 Durango 4.7L, error code 050601?

2005 Durango 4.7L, the check-engine light was lit up on the dash on Friday. Couldn't take it to the dealer that day.
Using the dash diagnostic, the odometer returns the code 050601 -- could
anyone tell me what that code is?
Thanks!
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It means you have 50, 601 miles on the truck. Diagnostic codes start with a letter (usually 'P') follows by four digits. Check your codes again.
By the way - you are cycling the ignition key three times, and not messing with the trip reset button, right?
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LOL, no, just 20K miles.
I was using the trip reset button trick -- should do something else, I take it... ? :)

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I cycled the ignition key three times -- I could only get a code the first time -- couldn't get a code after that....
The code, I believe, was U1120. Any ideas what it might be?
Thanks again!

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That's a UART code - means something was wrong with the OBD-II interface itself. Something's screwy... did it read 'Pdone' when it was finished? There has to be at least one 'Pxxxx' code to set the check engine light off.
It sounds like you're not cycling the key correctly. The 'ON' position is the position just before the starter engages - where all the instrument lights come on. The 'OFF' position is one position back from that - where the lights turn off. You should cycle the ignition ON-OFF-ON-OFF-ON, within 2-3 seconds, leaving the key in the final 'ON' position. You should be able to get a code reading every time by doing this.
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A funny thing, though, about how the check engine light first came on:
I was driving on a road alone, no other cars around, and saw the drawbridge was up. I coasted down, shifted into neutral, let it roll to a stop at the bridge, and cut the engine.
Ten seconds or so later I notice the engine was still running, so I turned the key (apparently) the rest of the way off. The engine turned off. Perhaps I didn't rotate the key quite far enough.
After drawbridge came back down and the barriers lifted, I cranked it up to go -- and the check engine light was on.
I'm really kind of thinking that the check engine light is just an oddity caused in some way by that improper shutdown, or whatever.... Perhaps ignition was cut for a split second, and threw a fault code due to interrupted signal from a sensor or something....
The check engine light stayed on the rest of the day (Friday) and the vehicle was not used this weekend. The check engine light did not come on today (other than the normal quick bulb test). The vehicle has run just fine the entire time.

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Okay - then whatever code got set cleared itself. I agree you probably 'made it mad' by the unconventional shutdown.
Tempermental little things, these computer controls... :)
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Absolutely, Tom, and you were dead-on with the ignition key -- far more than you know.
I never saw a P code -- just the U1120 followed thereafter by a row of dashes, I think?
Anyway the diagnostics showed a loss of power to half a dozens sensors throughout the vehicle. Remember, somehow in the initial shutdown when I turned the engine off at that drawbridge to wait a while, and then discovered the engine was still running? Apparently the ignition switch was in some half-run position.
They should consider changing the ignition switch to a system similar to what computers use nowadays. The power switch on OLD home PC's used to turn off the power supply, but nowadays it tells the computer's motherboard to initiate a shutdown. The motherboard and operating system do whatever they need to do to shut down the system, and then tells the power supply to power down.

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They also kindly informed me that, at 20K miles, I need to get that rear axle oil changed!
Every 15,000 miles! In an '05 Durango with factory synthetic axle fill. A vehicle that never tows and just idles along back and forth to work around 50mph every day. They're just wanting me to do the severe-service maintenance interval, of course.
There's not even a fluid change specified at all on the standard change interval in the manual, which surprised me -- not even at 100K or 150K miles. I'd be uncomfortable waiting past 100K miles, though.

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Yeah - that happened with the switch to the AAM axles. Frankly, I think it's AAM selling DC a bag of manure, and they're just passing it along to us.
No way does an axle needs it's fluid changed every 15,000 miles - when we were doing 50,000 miles on Dana axles.
I've been changing my axle fluids at 30,000 - only because it's easy enough to do, and it lets me use my drain plugs in my aftermarket diff covers :)
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50,000 miles? If so, I'm 35,000 miles overdue on my Dana 60 - Spicer 70 combo. Something to do my next weekend off. It's also time to adjust the bands on the 47RE, change the coolant, and do an oil & filter and fuel filter change. While I'm at it I suppose I should grease the suspension again out too. Good thing I don't have an ignition system to tune-up too.
--
Ken



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When I first bought my '05 RAM 1500 4.7L. I took it in to Dodge dealer for an oil change. They said it needed rear end service. I thought OK that shouldn't be much cost. It was $105...
Ed

enough
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Edward L. Dowdy wrote:

I don't understand the absurdly high prices shops charge for differential service. They claim its because it requires special oil for the limited slip etc. which is BS for that kind of cost. Labor wise its less than changing the engine oil.
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