2006 2500 v. 3500

Can anyone tell me the difference between the 2006 Ram 2500 and 3500 ( both single rear wheel)? I'm looking at buying one of these to pull my horses. The dealer suggests we should buy the 2500 because it has the
exact same specs as the 3500 except that the 3500 has one more set of leaf springs. Is this true? The published specs show that the 3500 has a slightly higher towing capacity. If both models have the same engine, transmission, horsepower and torque, I'll probably go with the 2500. Thanks for any comments.
Lowell Gould Denton, TX USA
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Higher GWVR on the 3500SRW (8800lbs. vs. 9900lbs.)
The powertrain is identical in both vehicles.
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You may find that although the vehicles can be similar, it is only with options at extra cost on the 2500, where they are standard on the 3500. This was the case for me and the choice was simple economics. In order to determine if that case is true, it is necessary to configure both models identically in great detail and then compare the costs. Steve

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On 8 Jul 2006 19:32:18 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@lxcattle.com wrote:

It is the same truck exactaly except for additional leaves in rear. It you buy a 3500 and a add leaving to rear you will have the equal of a 3500 SRW (and even more if you add more leafs and have 265 "E" tires as well) ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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All technically correct. However, as we found when investigating towing 5th wheel RVs, whatever aftermarket mods you make have absolutely no bearing on the manufacturer's published specifications. It is those published specs that the law goes by and an excessive GCWR load will still get you ticketed and towed in Illinois and Indiana, irrregardless of any suspension mods you might have made to accommodate the load. Moral of the story is if you need a 1 ton truck, get one.

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On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 01:04:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@dodgecity.cc wrote:

THis is over played because if you look at the rear suspension 90's Doge, Ford or GM truck, you will find that there is less springs back there now with a higher rated GVW to boot. Just because it says it on the door does not always make it so. I no of noone ever busted for being over GVW with a P/U (other than licesned weight for tags). You to major concerns with pressing GVW's is spring capacity and tire capacity with the later the most important for saftey. The axles, frames and brakes are that same. I have a 2000 K3500 SRW that is only "rated at 9200 GVW but it has more spriongs for the factory than a new 2500 HD with same GVW rating. I have had it past 10k many time in winter with no problems at all with handling or stopping abilty and it will carry a load well that will make a like "rated" 2500HD squat badly. YOu can not always take factory rating as the gosphel because on some model they are more focused on ride quailty for sales than real laod capacitry. Lok at a pre 88 GM 1500 4x4 and you will find 4 leaf and a booster in rear, on a 88 thru 99 3 leafs and a booster and current models two leafs and a booster (same leaf width and thickness too). Other brands have done simulair and likewise you will see the same of "less is better" other the years with 3/4 models too. THis is okay if you want a softer riding truck but you do not pad the rating to a higher GVW like Detriot has for sales while doing it. ALso take a 1500HD and a 2500HD, same tires springs and chassis yet one is rated 8600 and the other is 9200 and common sense would tell you that the 9200 would have atleast another leaf but it does not. THe rear axle is different (the 1500HD 9.5 will handle about 3 ton well and the 2500 HD will handle 4ton but you will exceed true spring capacty before you even come close overloading the 3 ton axle. Some do not like to hear this though because they want to believe otherwise. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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wrote:

still
so because you know of no one busted that means that no one ever has, no ever could be, and that its ok to exceed the safety limits set by the manufacturers engineering department?
You

so because you say they are worried about ride quality its ok to overload the factory specs?
Lok at a pre 88 GM 1500 4x4 and you will find 4

really? sorry but ill take the word of the manufacturer on the safe load specs on the trucks, im betting they know a thing or two more about the trucks they build.
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You seem to be missing one hugely important factor here...
Besides the fact that you could possibly receive a citation from a law enforcement official....lets just say that by some remote chance you were involved in an accident while you were towing your overweighted combination and it was your fault. How quickly do you think your insurance company would use that to their advantage and not have to pay up because you exceeded the safe operating paramaters of your vehicle and quite possibly drop you completely? At the same time the other person's insurance company would nail your sack to the wall and propel you to financial ruin if it is a serious enough of an accident.
Beyond that alone, you also have the GAWR, GCWR, and GVWR issues to consider.
Is the price difference worth the risk?
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witch was exactly my point in all my "so because snoman says so, makes it ok?"question, although i didnt go directly into that, in my previous responce. if you need the higher weight ratings or think you might need them someday, the price differance between the trucks is negligable as compared to the possible consiquences. you have to ask yourself one simple question, is it really worth risking my life, the life of others, and my financial future possibly just to save a little jack at the beginning?.
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I'm in agreement with you 100%.
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Laszlo Almasi
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I don't know what the other states do, but both Illinois and Indiana have *very* aggressive DOT safety enforcement bureaus and those folks are pros when it comes to knowledge of vehicle tow & load ratings and their keen ability to just eyeball your rig rolling down the road and tell that you're loaded beyond safe rated limits. In both states mentioned above they will stop you in a heartbeat, escort you to a scale and begin writing tickets. Whether you're a professional trucker or mom, dad & the kids heading out for a camping trip, it doesn't matter to these "special" DOT cops. Safety is their first concern.
When we were looking at big 5th wheel RVs earlier this year and trying to select the appropriate tow vehicle, we of course were "told" by many uncredentialed, self-proclaimed experts that (in a literal sense) we could pull a freight train with a Mini Cooper. Of course whether it's *able* to tug it down the road vs. doing so in a safe and legal manner are two entirely different points and the subject of some often times heated debate. Even setting up such a rig (Truck + 5th wheel RV) to just barely meet "legal" specs (i.e., with the 3500 diesel dually) vs allowing for a very comfortable margin of safety (minimum 20%) pointed us toward the 1 ton D50 every time.
Yes, certainly we could have done it with a 2500 SRW short bed, but prudence and good judgement said the D50 and G-rated tires was the way to go.

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snipped-for-privacy@dodgecity.cc wrote:

Uh, no. Generating revenue is their first concern. That is the reason they exist.
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Knowing that then it probably behooves you to make sure you don't attract any of their revenue-generating attention. Yeah, I know one of the Illinois DOT cops and yes he is something of a 'hot-dog'. The guy has vision like a cat. He can be rolling down I-57 at 70 mph and spot a reciprocity violation passing the opposite direction at highway speed.
Truckers will tell you getting stopped by a DOT cop is worse than a speeding ticket because you'll be on the side of the road for a good 30 minutes while he goes over you with a magnifying glass.
As a trucker, another nasty ticket to get is a speeding ticket from a private cop working for your vehicle insurance company.
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Laszlo, Any thoughts on paying any of the money you owe on your account? Beesley's Point Sea-Doo 609-390-1113 in case you lost the number.
Tom
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