2500 diesel tire pressures

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The doorplate on my truck says to fill the tires to 65 psi front and 80 psi rear. Are those pressures ok for tire wear if the truck is being driven with no load?
If not, how would I determine the correct tire pressure to create an uniform tire "footprint" for even tire wear?
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wrote:

I would leave front at 65 PSI because it is pretty heavy up there (a lot heavier than rear is with no load) In rear you can safely drop back to 50 or 55 PSI with no load in it. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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Justin, For what it's worth, my '06 says to inflate the rear to 40psi and the front to 50psi when not loaded. When loaded, it says rear at 70 and front to 60 psi. The tires are load range E with max inflation to 80 psi.
Kevin
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Justin, For what it's worth, my '06 says to inflate the rear to 40psi and the front to 50psi when not loaded. When loaded, it says rear at 70 and front to 60 psi. The tires are load range E with max inflation to 80 psi.
Kevin
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Justin, while the door plate is fine for the factory installed tires, ALWAYS use the data cast into the rubber on the tire sidewall as the definitive answer to pressure questions.
The pressure it notes is the pressure at which the tires should be run for maximum efficiency of fuel and wear. You can trade some of that wear life and fuel efficiency for comfort of ride by lowering the pressure, but that is exactly what it is.. a trade.
There is no other proper pressure to run tires than the one listed on the sidewall. You can experiment, but each tire and each truck and each driver will have different results. Thus take any info other than the specified pressure on the tire as opinion rather than proven fact.
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author)

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wrote:

This is incorrect which is not surpizing consideing the source. The tires show max pressure and max load and the door sticker is supposed to show recommended pressure for projected loads on axles because tire capacity is related to its pressure. Higher pressure will improve MPG a bit but nothing is gained running much past 60 PSI unless your actual load requires you to run more than that pressure. In the "old" days they used to include tire pressure/capacity charts/tables in owners manuals so you new were to set pressure at if you wanted to but today that info is kinda scarce at times. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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Normally I wouldn't reply to your repeated drivel. However, THIS drivel CAN get someone killed.

Tire sidewalls show recommended pressure and the load that the tire can carry AT the recommended pressure. If you want proof that a problem can be had by underinflating tires, please see Ford Motor Company and Firestone for the results. Numerous lawsuits, brought on by death and injury caused by tire failure, are on the books for anyone to see.
http://archives.cnn.com/2000/US/08/21/tiredeaths.pressure.ap/index.html
I'll repeat for those who are hard of understanding:
USE THE SIDEWALL RATING when selecting a pressure for your tire.

If the tires are NOT rated for 60 PSI, you can have CATASTROPHIC results by inflating to 60 PSI. If the tires are rated at over 60PSI, it is possible to overheat the sidewalls, causing CATASTOPHIC results.
AGAIN: Use the TIRE SIDEWALL as the source for PSI rating for the tires you are running.

The reason is "kinda scarce" is because not all vehicles have the samt exact tires on them as they left the factory with. If I were to inflate the tires on my 2000 Ram2500 to anything over 44PSI, I'd be over the spec for the tire. However, the factory tires were able to handle 65PSI (IIRC).
Again, check the sidewall before doing something that could result in injury or death.
--
Max

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wrote:

i went to my tire shop and asked them. the shop is a nationally known one. they are very strict with their guidlines, they follow the rules all the way. they have to, the liability is too huge.
i asked them. they said USE THE SIDEWALL RATING when selecting a pressure for your tire. no question, no controversy. USE THE SIDEWALL RATING.

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snipped-for-privacy@whatever.net wrote:

Heres an example why this advice is absolute idiocy...
Ex-GF had a 95 Chevy Crapalier coupe, had Badyear Vivas on it from the factory. Sidewalls said *44 PSI* on them. Having always heard the advice you're spewing here I actually pumped them all up to that level. Drove *really* funny, very busy... Got on the brakes a little bit for a yellow-light-going-red on the way back to the house and the ABS kicked in - ON DRY PAVEMENT. Hmm. Must be the cheap tires. Took it back to her to drive.
So a few days later I notice theres a 'suggested' pressure on the door sticker thats something like 30 PSI or somesuch. Set it down to that, handed my girlfriend the keys and told her to 'drive it like she was late for class'. 5 minutes later she returns and the damned sidewalls are scored halfway up, but damn she had a smile on her face. I pushed them back up to 35 psi and it drove fine and the tires wore evenly after that.
On my 92 Explorer XLT, I almost always ran 32 psi. It drove best that way. You could barely go around a curve in the road without the tires squeeling at the sticker-suggested 26 psi, but the sidewall 36 psi was *WAAAY* too high.
Oh... and I ran 120 psi on my Schwinn 10-speed.. 27x1.25" tires... Tire sidewall rating was either 130 or 150 psi, but 120 is all my old compressor could work itself up to. 120 psi was enough to break all the neighborhood posted speed limits and have the ability to coast *forever* after hitting top speed.
JS
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Who are you kidding, you reply to his at just about every opportunity and now you are using the Budd fear tactics as well, LOL!

Really Max, I have yet to see a chart on the side wall of any of my truck tires. I do however see a MAX pressure and a MAX load rating. These however are not recommendations, they are MAXIMUM limits.

What point exactly are you trying to make???? Ford recomended a lowered tire pressure to prevent rollovers and it worked. The rest of it amountd to nothing more than lawsuits and bogus accusations about the reason for some defective tire failures. Even in this article, there is no proof that the lowered pressure had anything to do with it and it went on further to mention that Goodyear installed 500,000 tires on those vehicles at that pressure with NO failures.

While this may be valid advice for a CAR tire, it is complete BS for a LT tire.

Where did he or anyone else say to go beyond the MAXIMUM rating on the side of the tire or is this just another one of your distortions? He was talking about an LT tire which many of them if not most have maximum ratings ABOVE 60 PSI.

Wrong answer. The TIRE SIDEWALL is a source of MAXIMUM PRESSURE and CAPACITY for the specific tire, not the only pressure the tire can be used at.

LOL, the chart is there for a reason Max. It is there because there could be huge load differences form one day to the next and if you think that one tire pressure (the max) is valid for the full load range, then you really need to do some reading on the subject.

At least this statement is valid despite what you actually meant.
--
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Ahh yes, another bullshit reply from Tbone.
My door label has NO chart, and notes that the front tires should be at 65PSI, and the rears at 80PSI.
My tire sidewall says it'll handle 3300 lbs at 44PSI.
So in your obviously professional, "know more than Max does" opinion, at what pressure do YOU feel I should keep my tires?
Think carefully.....you'll need a way to spin your way out of the obvious correct answer......
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Max

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Ahh yes, the typical Max response when once again being proven wrong.

Mine has that same bogus sticker and it lists the wrong size tires for the truck as well but the truck also came with a tire inflation pressures pamphlet that the owners manual specifically refers to. And on the back page, it has a few chart showing how much load the tires can handle with pressures from 30 to 80 PSI in 5 pound increments for all of the tires that the truck comes with. Gee Max, that is 12 different pressures. Now not all of the tires have values for all of the pressures on the chart as some pressures are either too high or too low for a given tire size but most of them have at least 6 entries. I guess that always filling them to the max is not the only or correct way to go.

Well, according to your absurd logic, you put the wrong size tires on your truck and that could lead to you getting killed.

I don't know, what size and type are the tires, how much of a load do you have on them, and at what speed do you do most of your driving? Just because they hava a max pressure of 44PSI, it doesn't mean that they must always be filled to that level and in some cases, they actually may need to be filled to up to 10PSI ABOVE the pressure rating on the side wall (LT tires only) and this is directly from the tire inflation pamphlet that came with my truck.

I don't need to spin my way out of anything Max. You have just proven once again that you don't know half as much as you think you do. http://www.goodyeartires.com/faqs/Inflation.html This is directly from Goodyear and all you need to do is read the second and third sentence. I think that I will take the word of a manufacturer over yours, no offence intended. BTW, I see in a recent post from MoParMaN that the new low sulfur diesel is just now coming out. I guess that you were wrong about that one as well Mr. I have been using it for years.
--
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None taken. You have just proven my point. Go back and read what I said in my initial reply. I specifically stated that the tire sidewall took precedence over the tag on the door pillar. Moreover, I specifically stated that any deviation from the sideway for the sake of comfort or load handling would result in a compromise that detracted from wear and ride.
But ultimately, SAFETY takes first billing, and THAT is derived from the sidewall rating of the tire.
Since you have specifically stated that the TIRE manufacturer is to be the final source of info, that means the best info on the truck is the sidewall of the tire, as I stated in my initial reply.
Have a nice day.
--
Max

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And Goodyear says you are wrong. Read sentence 4.

And once again, Goodyear says you are wrong and so does the tire inflation pamphlet that came with your truck.

Where did you come up with this? The sidewall simply states the maximums the tire is rated for so unless you are always at the or near the maximum load capacity of the tire, keeping it at the maximum pressure does not increase safety and as shown by the very article that you posted, can actually be dangerous.

LOL, I really feel sorry for you Max.

You too.
--
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Well Tom, its a simple case of reading the sidewall. I told you what pressures the sticker recommended, and you also noted that the tire size was incorrect on the sticker. Thus, the sticker is irrelevant in regard to my tires.
My tires are 265/75, the sticker rates 245/75. The sticker notes maximum pressures of 65 and 80 PSI. My sidewall calls for a maximum of 44PSI.
If I follow your advice, my tires explode.
My tires are the same size as factory, and are a load range above what the factory installed.
Sorry Tom, but you are wrong.
Done here.
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Max

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The sticker has nothing at all to do with the discussion or the point being made.

Big deal, that still doesn't mean that the MAXIMUM pressure printed on the side wall is the only pressure the tire can or even should be used at, only a maximum.

Really??? Show me exactly where I said to ignore the tires rated maximum and go blindly by the sticker on the pillar.

And they can only handle 44 PSI What is the load range and who makes them?

Just because you say it doesn't make it so, even if you really want it to be true. The article you posted, Goodyear, and the pamphlet that came with your truck says that you are the one who is wrong, even if you are completely unable to admit it.

You have been done for a while now Max. Have a nice day.
--
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Sorry Tom, it was the center of the discussion and was part of the original question. It appears you have failed to read once again.
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Max

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Sorry Max, but wrong again. The center of the discussion was varying tire pressure due to the load put on them and that running max pressure for the tire all the time is not always the best thing. You were the one who jumped in with a Budd style fear of death reply stating that the tire must ALWAYS be inflated to the max pressure printed on the sidewall or the tire could fail and someone could be killed. This is of course, complete bullshit because if it were true, your truck would not have come with that inflation pamphlet showing varying pressures for different loads. You then accuse Snowball of telling people to over inflate the tire with no regard to the sidewall maximum which he never did. I guess that was just some desperate spin. BTW Max, I thought that you were done.
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Wrong. Here is the original post:

As you can see, there is no mention of death at all in my original reply. Nor did I say that the pressure was to ALWAYS be at the rating on the sidewall.

Just straightening out your lies as usual. Now run along and play with Miles.
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Max

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wrote:
<severely sniped for brevity>

Not really any of my business to jump into your little squabble here, but can you reconcile these two statements for us?

DJ
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