360 thermostat location

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I'm guessing it's located on the top side of the engine. Just blew a lower radiator hose and decided to replace the stock thermostat with a 185 degree unit as is highly recommended. Let me know if
I am correct in my assumption on location. Also, any tips anyone may have while I'm in here doing this would be appreciated.
Next week I'm doing the DT TracBar, ball joints from Quad 4x4 and Borgeson steering shaft.
2001 Ram 2500 QC 4x4 5 speed.
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Laszlo Almasi
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Yep... follow the upper radiator hose. Where it ends, is the thermostat housing.
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Laszlo, I just replaced the thermostat on my wife's98 Durango with 360 and I never removed the upper hose off the piece that bolts down over the thermostat. I just loosened the 2 bolts and pulled it up by the hose and cleaned off the water outlet piece and engine side with a brass brush on the end of a drill. Used the special sealant they have at Auto Zone for thermostat gasket sealing. I think I put a 160 degree thermostat in when I did it. I just hate to have an engine running hotter than necessary. I hope this doesn't mess up the computer emission crap. I haven't noticed any problem in the 2 weeks or so since I did it.
Ben

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Nevermind that a T-stat that low will set an OBD-II code, not let the engine reach optimal operating temperature, and cost you some fuel economy. The entire FI system has been designed with an operating temperature of 195F.
But hey - at least it's not running too hot...
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It's my understanding that a 185 degree stat will really help the 360 perform better. Is that not quite the case?
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Laszlo Almasi
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Carolina Watercraft Works wrote:

Yes, and no. On a stock engine, it will probably perform worse, because the computer thinks the engine is still cold. It will run rich, idle poorly, and get crappy mileage. Guess how I know this? Since trying that experiment (and quickly reversing the process) I used a Hypertech programmer. This advances timing, and adds a smidgen more fuel. That worked great, but on a hot day or when towing, I would get pinging at heavy throttle. So I went back to the 180* thermostat, and added a bottle of Water Wetter. Truck doesn't get as hot, and no pinging. Last time I towed on a hot day, I abused the engine a little to try and make it ping - it didn't. Other than that, I notice no difference at all in operation.
So, bottom line: Stock engines should use stock thermostat.
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.boB
1997 HD FXDWG - Turbocharged!
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My 360's basically stock with a 185 thermo and it runs great. A/C on idling in traffic and 93 degrees outside is no problem at all. Mileage hasn't changed at all from the 195 thermo - still 14 mpg overall.
Bob, do you have a link to the Hypertech? What octane are you using at the pump?
Joe '03 Dakota 5.9 R/T CC '93 Mustang LX 5.0 hatch with a few goodies
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Joe wrote:

www.hypertech.com
There are two levels of tune available with the hypertech, 89 and 91 octane. I tried them both. 89 made a huge difference over stock, and got better fuel mileage. 91 didn't seem to make any additional improvements, but required premium fuel and got worse mileage. So I run mid grade all the time. Even when towing.
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.boB
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Thanks for the info.
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".boB" <bob

I've had the 160 degree thermostat in my 98 Durango for a couple weeks now and unless it's cool outside it's not going to stay at 160 degrees. Yesterday, with temps above 85 degrees mine would stay in the middle of the Temp range on the gauge. If it's sitting at idle in the heat it's going to be in the middle range. The only time that it actually stays at 160 degrees (the little mark on the left side of guage) is when it's in the 70's outside and moving. That hypertech programmer might be nice to fix the tire ratio. My 98 was supposed to come with some 15 rims but, someone had already put a set of the 16 inch aluminum on there like the newer Dakotas and Durangos have. My speedometer actually shows that it is going around 1.5 mph faster than it actually is or so says my GPS receiver. Oh yeah, the trip computer on my Durango shows that it was averaging 16.5 mpg on the interstate @ 70 mph yesterday and that was with 3.92 gears ;) and no I don't know if that's accurate. It'll get even higher mpg @ 55 mph on that trip computer.
PS. I'm ready to remove the catalytic converters and dual out the exhaust now after seeing all these epa commies in here.
Ben
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We aren't the enemy Ben, just telling you what the rules say. I'm all in favor of allowing mods and doing a simple sniff test. After all, the important part is what comes out the tailpipe, not whats under the hood. But the laws aren't written that way. And everyone who is in this hobby deserves to know what the rules are so they can find the best ways to avoid detection.
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The problem with just the sniff test is that it requires people to be honest and actually care and unfortunantly, that is something that fewer and fewer people are these days.
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"Max Dodge" < snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net> wrote in message
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??? The sniff test tells exactly whats coming out the tailpipe. No "honesty" factor about it, the engine cannot burn what is not there. If you are worried that someone will modify after being checked with a sniffer, all the other tests and inspections suffer the same flaw. At least with the sniff test, we know the car is meeting the emissions regs, not just looking like it will.
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Yea, at that particular time which with a little creative tuning has nothing to do with what is normally comming out of the tailpipe every other day of the year.

Really, it can be temporarily tuned to burn fuel far more efficiently than it actually does under normal conditions which is dishonest now, isn't it?

sniffer, all the

I am not worried about it but it does happen and while it can still happen with many of the current inspections, many of the more recent ones make it much more difficult to do, especially the ODBII one.

It means no such thing, unless of course, the person owning the car is honest and brings the car for inspection tuned the way it is the rest of the time. Gee, there is that honesty thing again.
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Ok......
Burning fuel efficiently means its burning correctly, which also means its at optimum power output for the amount of fuel input. Say, thats sounds like a performance objective.....Maybe the engine is tuned to pass a sniffer AND its making its best power?

Bullshit you aren't worried about it, both your previous statements say exactly that you are thinking someone will cheat on a sniffer test. Talk about spin, you say twice that someone could tune to pass the test, and retune for the rest of the year. Then when I say someone could do it to any test, you say you aren't worried about people cheating. WTF? Decide what you think THEN write, ok?

Gee, theres that "I'm not worried about it but I keep mentioning it" thing again. Face it, if its a matter of tuning, and we have proof that the car is not putting out excessive emissions, its probably not far from that the rest of the year. Its certainly better than a "it looks like it'll pass, but we have no idea whats coming out of the tailpipe." In that scenario, we have to worry about cheating, but we also have to worry that the stuff isn't working, even though its there.
I can see your argument going circular, so I'll let you blabber away at this point. I've made my point, even if you are too dense to understand it.
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of
than
it?
like
AND
LOL, best power and maximum power usually have nothing to do with each other. Also and unfortunately, with current emissions standards in many cases the engine must be tuned leaner than maximum efficiency to pass.

happen
it
any
you
Jeese, talk about spin. There is a big difference between worrying about something and knowing that it can and does happen. Like I said many times, comprehension is not as big thing with you. Talk about mastery of the language or the lack of it in your case.

Yea, and what's your point? Oh, that's right, as usual you don't have one. People can see what is happening without worrying about it.

rest
LOL, if that were true, there would be no reason for these "improved" tests. Actually, the ODBII test is designed to save time over the rolling sniffer test and it just happens to be a little harder to fool.

What does this even mean? If the computer is functioning normally and the sensors are sending the correct data to it, the engine has to be at or near its lowest possible emissions. If a sensor fails, the computer is usually quick to notice it and flag a code but even if it didn't, it still reports sensor outputs and any competent tester can see if the output of something (like the TPS) doesn't look right. If the computer itself fails, the engine in most cases doesn't run at all so there is no "it looks like it will pass" BS about it.

Actually, there is much less chance of that with the ODBII tests than a sniffer test where the engine could simply be "rigged" to pass the test but you know that, right?

this
No, you realised that once again, you have no valid argument and are tyring to save face, as usual.
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Okay - but if the sniff test is done at idle, what about engines with big, lopey cams, that are most efficient at 4000-5000RPM or so, and run super-rich at idle? If left tuned for best top-end performance, they'll surely fail the sniff test. Thus - the owners lean the snot out of them, get a 'PASS' sticker, pull over two blocks from the center, richen it back up, and light 'em up for 2 city blocks :)
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First, it depends on the sniff test, those are performed in so many different ways its silly.
Second, its undeniable that someone will cheat the emissions testing.
If the concern is cleaner air, then certainly a sniffer will tell more than a visual inspection. If the concern is getting a car to pass regardless, by all means I like the visual withut a sniffer, the less they know the better, right?
The reality is that cars like you described, in PA at least, can be registered as classic or antique, and be exempt from emissions. Further, there is a clause for low mileage that allows a car to be exempt from testing.
But my point was/is, NO testing is foolproof, so a sniffer would likely catch more stuff than a visual, and would be a help to those with stock configurations.
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means its

sounds
big,
they'll
them,
back
Many states are using a dyno to run the engine up and test at idle and 2000-4000 rpm. Fail any part of it and your done. Also add in that some states also do a visual inspection and will fail you for illegal parts that way as well. I am betting that many more states will go to this method as the feds tighten the grip.
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wrote:

Sniff test? Never heard it called that but it does bring back memories.
beekeep
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