5.9L Long Block or Short Block

Which do I want???? Will they both fit in a 98 4x4 Dodge Durango???

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plaidfro
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The term long or short does not refer to the length of the block, it refers to the completeness of the build. A short block is just the block and its internal components (pistons, connecting rods, crank) but does not include the cam, pushrods, heads, intake ... A long block is more complete and includes most of what is missing from the short block but is still usually missing a few things and is not ready to run.
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"plaidfro" < snipped-for-privacy@no-mx.forums.yourdomain.com.au> wrote in message
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TBone wrote:

What he said.
Your decision should be based on a lot of things. Cost is only one of them. But also, what are you looking to do? Trailer towing vs. drag strip runs vs. daily commuting.
One of these years, mine will need a rebuild. Or I'll want to do it for better performance. It's only got 70K now, so no rush. I'd use an essentially stock long block, with cast or hypereutectic pistons, and a slightly better cam for more torque. Then add as set of Edelbrock's new heads, and probably the stock (but slightly improved) beer barrel intake. That should make a real stump puller that will last another 100K+ miles and not cost a fortune.
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.boB
1997 HD FXDWG - Turbocharged!
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refers
its
include
usually
of them.

vs. daily

for better

pistons, and

heads, and

should make a

fortune.
With what you are going to do, wouldn't you be better off starting with a short block?
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TBone wrote:

Maybe. When I get ready to do it, I'll start looking around and see what's available. Sometimes it's better to get a long block custom built, and some times not. I'll cross that bridge when I get to it. I only have 70K miles on the engine now, and it runs just great. But I can never leave well enough alone when it comes to engines. So I'm thinking about it now. I haven't even finished the two projects I'm working on now, and I'm already thinking of a third. And then there's the wife's car..........
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.boB
1997 HD FXDWG - Turbocharged!
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Short block will generally include the cam and lifters. Any that do not are better left in favor of those that do.
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Max

Give a man a match, and he is warm for a short while. Light him on fire, and
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include
are
I guess that depends on stock or performance. A basic stock short block may come with a cam but not a performance one. If you were going stock, why would you use a short block anyway? On the performance side, they simply have no idea what I want to use the engine for, what RPM range I want the power in, what heads, intake, or fuel system I am going to use so how could they have any idea what cam to give me. Now the cam bearings would be installed but usually not the cam itself.
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may
several reasons:
bad rod, excessive ring wear, broken crank
anywhere else, use a long block; the extra dollars wil be saved on NOT having to re-do the heads
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not
While all true, in most cases like this, people would just replace the entire engine. The time saved and the warranty in most cases more than make up for the extra cost of the engine itself.

agreed.
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I gather you are trying to swap a 360 in where a 318 is now
first, make sure it will pass emissions inspections if that is required
the ECM MAY be able to increase fuel flow enough for the larger engine
one of the mounts is different, I think LH side
the balancer is different
the flex-plate may or may not be different, the converter for the transmission will need to be changed
that being said, I'd go with a long block, to avoid un-necessary parts-swapping, plus Dodges are bad for valve guides needing to be replaced; what you save on head work will make up for the extra cost of LB vs SB

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Thank you all for your input... I'll have to let you guys know how it ends up. Looks like I will go with the Long Block, no real need for the performance mods. I just want more power to tow a trailer, especially when travelling uphills.
My 318 has about 200k miles on it and the rear seal is starting to leak so it needs to be pulled anyways, hence the question of upgrading to the 360.
Thanks
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plaidfro
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Here is a tip, get on the net and look for a late model engine from a wreck with low mileage. Buy the engine complete with computer and cat. You will need some odds and ends from both the old and new engines. Steve

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