75 Dodge 1 Ton problem

I've got this falling apart RV. The problem is when I start it it won't drive untill it has warmed up for 10 minutes. It idles fine and I can give it gas and its fine but if I put it in gear it dies. If I put
it in gear and give it no gas and its warm enough it will maybe start to move but the slightest bit of pressure to the gas peddle and it dies. This was even worse in the winter when this was the only thing I had to drive to work for a week. It wouldn't run right till it had been 15 minutes warming up and I live in Arkansas where winter mornings are usually around 40 so not real cold. I don't have a book. There is some sort of vacume device with a line running to some sort of big diafram with a linkage to the carb. this appears to not be working. Ken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Had the same problem several times with my 1971 Dodge Brougham RV. I changed the transmission fluid and filter to fix the problem. Mine sits at the deer lease and I rarely move it. You can have mine for parts if you want to come to Texas to get it.
--
--Scott Hendryx--



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How long has it been sitting?
Usually, a failure to drive away from cold is a choke adjustment problem.
The device hooked to your carb linkage may be a cruise control diaphragm.
--
Budd Cochran

John 3:16-17, Ephesians 2:8-9, Romans 3:23, 6:23
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ken,
If you're still having trouble when it's warm, then I'm willing to bet you've got a vacuum leak, a failed or misadjusted accelerator pump, or your carburetor has gummed up. Narrowing down potential vacuum leaks one by one is easy enough -- get a good manual if you need to know what and when certain components get vacuum.
You should then check to make sure that AS SOON as you move the throttle linkage, a healthy squirt is provided from the accelerator pump. A late reaction might be cured by making sure the linkage is adjusted properly -- no squirt and you need a rebuild.
If you've got a 2bbl Holley on it (OE 2210?), and you have both a good accelerator pump squirt and healthy vacuum, then it suggests that the transfer ports on the base plate aren't being supplied with enough fuel to do their job. I often run across circumstances on older commercial trucks where if they don't move much, the base plate gets just enough gum and corrosion in it to let it idle but have a hell of a time getting off idle. This isn't a spray-can carburetor cleaner job -- it needs to sit in a dedicated bucket of the stuff and have a thorough rebuild.
Maybe one step closer? Maybe someone's lousy armchair diagnosis?
...
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How long has it been sitting?
Usually, a failure to drive away from cold is a choke adjustment problem.
The device hooked to your carb linkage may be a cruise control diaphragm.
It sat at least a year before I got it and then sat for another year with maybe 50 miles on it. It is worse than it was when I got it. My brother thought that "device" was maybe connected to the air conditioner. I'll track it down
We've got a vacume pump I can pt on it and listen to the sucking. I'm also going to rebuild the carb. Anyway thanks to all ya for the help Ken
Jon wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What size engine? If it's a 318 or 360 the crossover passage in the intake manifold is notorious for plugging solid with carbon, this doesn't allow heat to the carburetor which makes for a long warmup period.

Probably cruise control.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

This is a common problem with old carbureted mopars.
You probably have a worn out carburetor. Rebuilding it will not fix the problem. If you really want to keep it, and I can't imagine why, you will have to buy a new or nearly new carburetor.
JAM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bullfeathers!
I've rebuilt many carbs and some of them several times and had them work just like new. In one case, a carb from Carburetor Exchange in Indianapolis required rebuilding to fix THEIR mistakes.
Of course, you also have to be smarter than the carburetor . . . .
--
Budd Cochran

John 3:16-17, Ephesians 2:8-9, Romans 3:23, 6:23
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.