A bit of Regular mixed with Diesel... Problems?

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Hey gang,
What's to be expected if a few gallons of regular gas was mixed in with aproximately 15 gallons of diesel? Any serious problems?
Thanks,
David
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Depends on the vehicle to tell you the truth. Some older Diesel vehicles fair well with gas in the tank, most newer ones do not due to the computer controls etc. When in doubt just drain the tank and refill with the correct fuel.
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Some folks run 10% gasoline in the winter, to make it easier to start. I'm not sure beyond that.
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Christopher A. Young
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Well it'll be winter here in KC in a few more days. So far I haven't "sensed" any problems and have ran about 50 miles so far. I assume gas and diesel will mix, that it's not like oil & water, so if I haven't noticed any problems yet, I should be ok. BTW... it's an '05.
Thanks, David

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David ~ wrote:

Are you planning on intentionally mixing gasoline with diesel fuel for a winter blend? If so, don't do it. Use kerosene or #1 diesel.
From Cummins Service Bulletin # 3379001-10 Fuels For Cummins Engines:
Under no circumstances must gasoline or alcohol be used to dilute diesel fuel. This practice creates an extreme fire hazard and under certain circumstances an explosive hazard. Gasoline dilution is not an effective way to lower cloud point (20 volume-percent gasoline only lowers cloud point 4C [7F] and it lowers the fuel viscosity, cetane number, and flash-point). Alcohol dilution will increase the cloud point.
In cold-weather operation, the most common method of preventing fuel waxing problems is to dilute heavier, higher wax content fuels such as U.S. Number 2-D diesel fuel with lighter, lower wax content fuels such as Number 1-D diesel or jet fuel. This reduces the concentration of wax, and thereby reduces both the cloud point and pour point. Blended fuels of this nature are more expensive to use both because they cost more and because they have a lower thermal energy content. A typical blended fuel contains 30 to 60 volume-percent light distillate fuel, usually yielding a 3 to 7C [5 to 12F] drop in cloud point, and a 5 to 11C [9 to 20F] drop in pour point. Lower wax content fuels must be added BEFORE wax forms to be effective.
Ken
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There is no doubt in my mind that they WILL mix. After all, they are both petroleum products.
The problem is that gasoline is far more volatile (I can't remember how to spell that word, it's pronounced vol-LIT-tuhl) than diesel. As such, it will vaporize a lot easier, and will ignite a lot easier. May pre-detonate and damage your cylinders.
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No, I have no intention of mixing fuels... This was a fluke that *should not* be repeated!
Thanks, David
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There must be a reason why folks panic at the thought of gas in a diesel vehicle. I remember it's got to do with predetonation, cylinder damage, and so on. If it was "less combustible" no one would worry much about it.
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This topic was discussed at a class conducted by John Holms at Carson Dodge in Carson City, NV. Diesel 101, "The care and feeding of a Dodge Ram Diesel". www.diesel101.com A major concern, as I understand it, is the injector pump and lift pump are lubricated by the fuel passing through them. Since gasoline has no lubricating properties, there is a real possibility both of these items could be damaged by running gasoline through them. John's recommendation for correcting this issue was to not start the diesel, or immediately shut it down, and drain the contaminated fuel from the tank. If gas was run through the engine the fuel system should be drained and the filter replaced. I think you should be at your dealer by now.
Mike B

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I'm gonna be in SO much trouble *grin*
my wife a while back filled our liberty with 87 octane. left it running while she filled it, and yes the fuel light was on so it was really low. and drove it about 1/2 a mile before she realized what she had done. she immediately pulled off and shut it down. then called me, I had to clear the equipment trailer and go get it oh what a joy that was. but anyways, after removing the tank and draining the fuel/gas mix (much more gas than diesel) out of the tank and some fresh diesel the liberty I'm proud to say still runs like a champ and hasn't missed a lick. no notable damage.
just be glad yours was only a few gallons.
and id imagine if the liberty lived though that you have nothing major to worry about.
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Diesel has Cetane while gasoline has Octane. Those products are inversive to each other.

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I'll admit, I have no clue what that means. Perhaps some more detail?
I've got three years of college, and an AAS degree. Chemistry was one of my favorite classes, so I'm interested in what you meant.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cetane_number
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So, what's the answer?
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What's the question?
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Ken

Stormin Mormon wrote:
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In order to get either fuel to combust, it has to first be vaporized. In a gas engine, it's ignited by spark. And in a diesel, by compression.
But, both fuels have to be vaporized to work. Gasoline is a lot easier vaporized, and so I'd expect problems with early ignition, and who knows what else. Cylinder damage.
I don't believe that "combusted through heat and compression" is the opposite of neeing to be vaporized. Diesel also needs to be vaporized.
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vaporized.
easier
vaporized.
No. Diesel is sprayed into a fine mist combined with air to be compressed. CY: http://www.howstuffworks.com/diesel.htm Actually, sprayed into the air after the air is compressed. And it's sprayed in order to make it easier for fuel to vaporize. Vapors burn, liquids do not.
Sorta like wheat or rice in a processing plant. The individual pieces of rice or wheat does not burn very well, but once processing starts and makes a lot of dust combined with air makes a very volatile product. CY: That sounds like a half-right comparison. The atomizing helps the combustion because it provides more surface area to create vapor.
Gasoline is heated into a vapor. CY: Not on any engine I've ever owned. All the gas engines I've owned have used spraying to make a mist, which makes it easier to vaporize the gas.
That is why in the "good ol days" that gasoline engines did not work well when cold. The gasoline was not being vaporiaed very well. CY: While heat helps, the major factor is spraying. You didn't answer my original question. Please explain why "combusted through heat and compression" is the opposite of neeing to be vaporized.
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Trent, please explain to me why "combusted through heat and compression" is the opposite of neeing to be vaporized. I've read a web page on diesels, but I still don't get what you meant.
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