a/c pressure

my 99 doge ram has a low side pressure that goes up to 60 down to 15 when compressor kicks in compressor goes on and off every few seconds or so

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On Jul 14, 4:27?pm, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

======================== thank you......... for sharing with us.
As a reward for your willingness to share with the NG, we would like to offer you a ONE TIME free trial of our "Trouble Shooter" service.
In order to take advantage of this one time free offer........simply post a question....and tell'm MarshMonster said they should answer it for you ......AT NO...NO....NO........CHARGE!!!!!!
again, thankyou for sharing with us, and welcome to the group........ we hope you find the experience as enjoyable as we do.
:)
~:~ marsh ~sips his crownroyal......lights off the homegrown....mmmmmm mmmmm............good stuff~ ~:~
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In article

Oh great, another fooking service writer giving away labor time...

It was a good one!
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This is symptomatic of a low refrigerant charge. You have a leak somewhere. Whether it's a very slow leak, or a larger one, can only be determined by proper troubleshooting (either by recharging with a leak detecting dye, and looking for the source of the leak with a black light, or by recharging and using an electronic refrigerant detector, something only a professional shop would have).
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On Jul 14, 10:17?pm, "Tom Lawrence" > This is symptomatic of a low refrigerant charge. ?You have a leak somewhere.

================== You have posted misinformation in an NG frequented by professional service technicians.
We regret to inform you that you are on official "YardBird Advice" watch.
We greatly regret this haveing to take this action, however, if your future replies are based on fact, solely on fact, and entirely on grounded on factual content.......we will release you from this watch list. However, further posting of misinformation, may, can, will, and most likely......cause you to recieve blatant and derogeratory (?).....flaming and acuasutory replies from the professionals who frequent this NG.
as a side note....... we do appreciate you not including ANY reference to ANY religious beliefs....as this seems to cause extensive and lengthy off topic discussion which takes away from the intent of this NG, which, as we all know...... is ONLY to help those in need......not to hender the process.
FACTS SUBSTANTIATING LISTING POSTER ON YARDBIRD WATCH
1) AutoZone......carries a fine, high quality, affordable, user friendly, assortmant of UV detection doityerselferandbreakit.......AC kits.
if further evidence is needed.....please feel free to forward a written request..mark it...."Attention....YardBird Tech Watch".
and we'll git back to you.....as soon as we can......or later......or maybe........or........if we want to...........or......we may opt to disregard any and all correspondence from you.
~:~ marsh ~sips his crownroyal........file 13s the posting~ ~:~
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Interesting...... Considering that Tom posts with a better "information-to-bullshit ratio" than the "professional service technicians", and that the "professional service technicians" have been wrong in the past, and that the "professional service technicians" don't post here nearly as reliably as Tom does, and finally that the "professional service technicians" usually fail to post any information to prove Tom wrong whilst claiming Tom to be full of crap, I think I'll take Tom's advice over the "professional service technicians".
About the only "professional service technician" around here that I'd believe without question would be Mike Simmons.
I can name at least two "professional service technicians", who after a lengthy argument finally agreed that I, a lowly "YardBird", might actually know something. Well, at least one of them did. The other, not so much.
--
Max

sits back, drops lit match and wonders if MM will stop drinking while typing
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You're not giving Marsh a fair shake Max! He's a professional trainer for Daimler Chrysler and is involved at a very high level, particullary in the transmission sector. Here's Marsh in a Chrysler transmission training film:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbVY5teBzlg

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BigIronRam wrote:

to
take
actually
for
film:
There's info on the history of Marsh's Turbo Encabulator here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retro-Encabulator ;^) Bryan
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Now that you've met the dealership service training department, allow me to introduce the sales department:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0FrOTFmWTM

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Excellent video!!!!
--
Max

Join www.devilbrad.com and find out what free exchange of info is all about.
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Aw, now ya gone and done it...
Denny - he meant you, as well. Really... he did. :)
As for the self-proclaimed "professional" above.... well, I'm just touched he cares enough to write my name down. Damn near brings a tear to my eye, lemme tell ya.
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Denny's a technician?
I thought he was a rabbit?
Rabbit technician?
--
Max

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Hmm, I've been around here long enough to know that Tom posts excellent information (I even consider him the "go to" guy on most threads). I haven't read any advice from a "professional service technician" in this thread, which begs the question, why are professional service technicians frequenting this NG if not to provide help? Is it only to shoot down those who do provide assistance to other DIY types?
I have no problem paying for the time and expertise of technicians, doctors, farmers, police, etc., etc. However, I find it curious that some one would spend so much time typing a response to a post that one disagrees with, without providing any information relevent to the OP.

Fortunately, the professional service technicians I deal with don't display the attitude expressed above.

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Tom... Your response solution for a very small hard to detect a/c leak is right on but begs the following question. A leak that takes a year or more to lose enough refrigerant to cause more than occasional bubbles visible thru the sight glass is the situation I'm in. The system holds vacuum after complete evacuation rendering an opinion from the a/c shop that all is fine. The same shop two years earlier inspected with full system using a black light etc, and found no leaks. Refilled system and added dye. Today no dye is visible but system has lost refrigerant as stated earlier. Have you or any other contributor to this forum had any experience with products that claim to be able to stop very small a/c leaks just by adding the product to the a/c system. This is similar with those stop leaks for radiators that I'll never use again or recommend as my experience with my one time use just to save radiator shop cost was a disaster. The product blocked many non problematic sections of the radiator causing overheating that resulted in a radiator shop visit anyway. Am I into a similar possibility with stop leak product far A/C's?
On 7/15/07 12:17 AM, in article Skgmi.7774$ snipped-for-privacy@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net, "Tom Lawrence"

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I last summer, my AC worked as you describe. I had a local tech put guages on it this spring when I found it to be not working. He claimed that the "orifice tube" was clogged. I cannot prove this one way or the other.
What I saw in your OP was that you always had pressure, which leads me to the full description of my problem this spring.....
Two years ago, the AC failed, noticably in the evaporator core, which is under the dash. I replaced this and the accumulator, and had a professional do the recharge. The AC worked, but not as well as thought it ought to compared to the factory charge.
Last year, the AC worked about half as well as the prior year. I was broke, so I recharged from a can. This appeared to work, although the compressor still cycled. I waited a month, and no improvement. So I set the lone guage of the can filler on the low pressure side, and observed. Pressure would go DOWN until the compressor came on... ODD I thought....
The tech claimed I had too much in ths system (which is very possible) and that the orifice tube was clogged. Once I had replaced that, my evap core wanted to be replaced again. This too was done. The tech then tested and filled the system properly, and my AC works like it did when new.
I think you may need to replace the evaporator core, the orifice tube, and the accumulator. Parts cost is about $200-$225 IIRC.
Here is why:
Evap core is likely the slow leak you cannot find. If your shop claims that none of the AC system shows the dye, ask them to spot the drain tube or the suspension under the drain tube. The evap core is the main source of leaks in these trucks, so I'd look there first.
The accumulator is what "cleans and filters" the refridgerant, so replacing it adds a measure of reliability to the system.
The orifice tube is what meters the R134, turning it into a gas that flows through the evap core, making the core cold. It can clog, according to the tech, causing very odd readings on the guages, and a continuous cycling of the compressor when the refridgerant is full or above full.
If you'd like to try replacing the evap core yourself, let me know, I have pics of replacing mine.
--
Max

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Hi Group,
Been a member for a long time, first time to post. At the risk of being flamed out by certain other posters in here, I'll preface this by saying I am a typical owner who prefers to do most of his own work. I'm, not a professional mechanic, but serious enough to have most of the right tools, compressor and air tools, etc. I use professionals when I must. Two different shops looked (didn't really, "look", but formed an opinion) at the AC on my 2000 Dakota, which was not working at all. In both cases, told me "9 hours to disassemble the dash.. the problem is your evaporator.... all the Dakotas have that problem". Considering this was their direction without proving the problem, I was hesitant to give either a go ahead. I recently came across a kit at Wallyworld (Walmart) that came with the gauge and hose with the quick connect for the low pressure side service connector, and three cans.... dryer, sealer/dye leak detector, and refrigerant oil chill. Good set of instructions to do each in order, running the truck for some time between injections. At a hundred bucks, I figured it was worth a shot at saving about $1,200. It worked! We've just gone through a very hot spell, and the system worked marvelously.... from a system that had not worked for about a year and a half, and a compressor that didn't even kick in because of low pressure. It's been a month, the pressure hasn't dropped, no sign of any leaks. I've talked to three other people who have tried the kit, all with similar results. Not to say this would work for everyone, but, given the right symptoms, seems to doo the trick.
FInal note: I'm not employed by Wallyworld, the manufactuer of the kit, or any other influence to make this sound like an ad. I'm a Dakota driver and wanted to share my experience.
Cheers....
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wrote:

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Have you checked the condensate drain tube, and anything below it, for signs of the dye? A leak in the evaporator could go un-noticed.

I have, actually. A year ago, a friend had a slight leak in his A/C system, with pressure readings similar to yours. Not wanting to spend too much money on the vehicle, we just used a can of R134a (the MAC-134 kit from Interdynamics - refrigerant, oil, and leak sealer all in one), a high-side gauge, and a thermometer to measure the vent temps. We got the system back to acceptable (or even better... 41F at the vents on a 78F day, minimal airflow over the condenser). A year later, it's still good.

I'm sure there are products out there that may indeed gum up the works. I've never been much of a fan of them, but in the above case, there wasn't much to lose. It's the only time I've used something like that, but it's hard to argue with the results. For $25, he's had good A/C performance for over a year.
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