Are you guy's serious???

I don't get it.
Jodi has a hole in a sidewall on a tire that is probably 5+ years old and you folks want her to put a couple of string plugs in it?????????????
WTF it isn't a ATV, it is a friggin' truck!!
You'd have her running down the road hit a bump and the whole mess that was stuck in the hole comes out in a big hurry and she could very well be on her roof.. All to save the price of a tire.
Maybe I'm missing something here.
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I think we're all mising exactly where the hole is... A photo would help greatly, but if it is truely a sidewall hole, then the tire is a good spare, and not suitable for everyday use, IMHO...
I think Jodi needs to look for a used tire of the same size and style, and when that can't be found, perhaps one new one? Then she has a spare, too...
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wrote:

This is pretty darn descriptive.
"a screw, been there long enough the head is gone - but on the inside edge of the tire, along the sidewall near the tread. "

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Roy, you could just as easily worry about being shot/runover sitting in your house. Yes it is possible, and depending where you live I guess probable, but lottery and lightning strike odds come to mind.
When I was broke, I've done things I wouldnt do if I had money to burn to fix it right. I feel that she has been fairly warned that it isnt a "good" idea, but it will probably work, if she wants to take the chances.
A small screw means slow leak, even if she leaves the screw in there, better to remove screw and try to seal it with a plug it. BTW with me and over 100 tires in use yearly (reasonable size farm), I have yet to have a "serious" consequence {unless you mean missing lunch one after noon taking the plugged tire to town to get fixed) because the plug leaked.
JMC: If it was a front tire, and you are worried, plug that tire, and move it to the back if the rest of the tires are same size and all, or swap both front & rear probably better. then if something unprobable happened, it wouldnt be a steering tire, if you know what I mean?

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In the UK, it is totally illegal to fix a punctured tyre (correct English spelling, hahaha) if the puncture is on the sidewall or within a certain distance from it. This is for good reason, no-one's life is worth less than a tyre if it fails - not just the driver, but you are also responsible as the driver for any passengers and third-parties that may become involved. How would any of you feel if a "botched" tyre repair suffered a catastrophic failure due to unseen carcass cord damage and your out-of-control heavy vehicle plowed into a group of mothers and children, for instance? Remember of course that the highest normal loadings in a rotating tyre at any half-decent speed are the centrifugal loadings within the sidewalls, placing immense tensile stress within all the sidewall cords. Sorry, but it just isn't worth the risk in my opinion and I think it is a highly irresponsible thing to try and do. Badger.
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Suddenly, without warning, Badger exclaimed (12/15/2010 2:26 PM):

This, I knew. Hubby's truck got a sidewall flat while we were there.
Seems like every time I've been in a vehicle that has gotten a flat or just picked up a nail, it is ALWAYS the sidewall. What do they do, line 'em with magnets so we have to replace them sooner?
jmc
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wrote:

Maybe you should stop going around turns on two tires.
beekeep
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On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:03:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@radix.net (beekeep) wrote:

But, but that reduces tire wear by about 50%...
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Suddenly, without warning, PlowBoy exclaimed (12/15/2010 12:13 PM):

Nope, it's the off hind.... I mean right rear. Lady at Goodyear laughed when I called it the "off hind", her Mom is a horsewoman too so she knew what I meant :)
I kind of like the idea of plugging it, then using it as a spare. Since most shops won't plug a sidewall, where can I get the plugs and tool (and glue?) to do it myself?
jmc
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wrote:

You just continue to babble on and support your half assed advice.

If you get a blow out in a front tire and if you have yor act together you can probably steer it to the side of a road. If you loose a rear tire you are pretty much along for the ride. Unless you know how to steer with the accelerator and the steering wheel to keep it straight.
The questionable tire goes on the front where you stand a chance of controling the truck should a blowout happen.
Screw it it's not my truck or life.
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wrote:

Get off the farm and try it at highway speed!
Nah, don't bother You can paint it any way you want, your advice was half aased and at worse friggin' dangerous.
But for the sake of this thread you are right, I'm done as I don't really give a fuck about it.
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Suddenly, without warning, Roy exclaimed (12/15/2010 10:00 AM):

Here's the problem. The screw (or what's left of it) must be nearly invisible - two other shops missed finding it. I can't find it, but as I'm looking while the tire is on the truck, I'm not terribly surprised...
Using this tire as a spare isn't something I'd considered. Would it hold air better with no weight on it? 'Cause a spare that I have to fill every couplea days isn't any more useful than a load bearing tire that I'm already doing that to.
jmc
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Suddenly, without warning, PeterD exclaimed (12/15/2010 8:23 AM):

It's nearly invisible. Two regular shops could not find the leak, it was the Goodyear tire place that finally found it. Being on the inside edge, I haven't yet found it either, but I'm still looking.
(suspicious thought: They wouldn't mark it for me when asked, "the chalk would wear right off")

So, circling back: My understanding is you cannot replace just one tire on a 4x4, that the tolerances of the diff is pretty small (or something). These do have a decent amount of treadwear, they just also have a decent amount of tread left. There would likely be a visible difference in the tread of a new tire vice my current ones. Finding a spare of the same brand/model may or may not be easy, but how could I be sure I got one with the same amount of wear?
jmc
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wrote:

Just wrap your trusty tape measure around it! Steve
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wrote:

It is not a problem *if* the differential is open, and not a limited slip one. Even then the issues are probably non-existant. First you need to figure out if your vehicle is LS or not. I'd guess not, but I could be wrong.

Measure the tire coming off, and look for one about the same? personally, I think you will end up with two new tires, which will eliminate most of the issues you are facing. And chalk the entire experience up to life being a... <bg>
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Suddenly, without warning, PeterD exclaimed (12/16/2010 8:55 AM):

It is most definitely limited-slip.

Tell me about it!
jmc
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