Battery question.....

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I seem to have an issue with my '01 2500 QC 4x4...
A couple of times lately I left my hazard lights on, once hile helping to remove a fallen tree on a road. Left the truck
to block the road for safety. Got back in and I'll be damned if the battery wasn't about dead. How long do you guys experience your batteries to last under those conditions? Granted my Ram has never needed the hazards for it's own sake but I expected this brand new Odyssey battery to last a hell of a long time. I'm thinking it is all hype. Any input?
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Laszlo Almasi
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How long a battery holds up under any load is a matter of the ratio of the Amp/hour rating to load. The more Amp/hours in your battery, the lower the load, or both, the longer the lights will flash.
A 450 A/h battery in my old Valiant would burn the dome light for three days before the battery went dead (don't ask how I know . . .), a 650 A/h battery would last a third longer, four days.
Is the battery the one "sized" to your vehicle, or did you get a larger than stock battery? When I buy a battery for my cars, I always get the largest A/h rating that will fit in the car / truck.
Budd

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Worse yet. On my 2004 CTD, if you leave the parking lights on they shut off automatically. Not a good thing if you need them for safety.
Al
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My 95 Lebaron has the headlight delay feature for getting out and seeing a path to your door, but I rarely get to use it... I park behind my house. VBG
Budd

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Ok...lets talk about batteries since maybe this one is a turd. It's an Optima with 870 CA, 750 CCA, 55 AH and 120 RC.
I wouldn't think hazard lights would be that much of a drain on this battery given all the hype on them....but maybe I'm wrong.
What batteries have you guys used and what are your opinions.
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Laszlo Almasi
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You need to just take the battery back and have it load tested. A defective new battery is a possibility.

I have two Interstate Megatrons that I put in the truck in '98 and they are about to be replaced. If I don't drive the truck at least every couple of weeks I get the dreaded click-click-click when I hit the key. Without going out and looking, I think they are the 950 cca batteries. I'll be putting Megatrons back in when I get around to replacing them.
Denny
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Interstate batteries are a lot better today that when they first hit the market.
Budd

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How many bulbs are being flashed? 4-6-8-120? You could have a battery built with forklift cells (2.3 volts, 900 amps maximum current per cell X 6 and 240 pounds weight per cell) but if you're flashing accesory bulbs along with the originals, it isn't going to hold up as long.
What condition are your cables / cable ends / connections??? general wiring? All resistances use up power.
What do you know of the battery manufacturer? There are some really cruddy Chinese made batteries being sold in the US now.
Budd

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Just the standard number of bulbs...nothing aftermarket.
Another note...I used to have the Red Top battery but had it replaced after it left me stranded at a gas station. they replaced it but I opted for the Yellow Top this time. The R/T was maybe 6 months old if I recall. Afterwards, they told me they load tested the battery and it was good. So then I questioned my alternator but it has never given me problems and seems ok. Maybe I need to have it tested as well???
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Laszlo Almasi
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Wouldn't hurt to have it tested. Do you have an aftermarket sound system installed ( radio/cd changer/amplifiers/etc.) or fog / driving lights that you use constantly? That's more load draining the battery ev en with the engine running that may not have been replaced ( battery recharged) before you turned on the 4-ways. It's also why the Sports Compact owners end up with charging systems that could power a battleship.
There are so many possibilities, that it's hard to tell you what is going on, to be honest. And, to be honest, if one battery from a manufacturer / supplier failed me that quickly, I would really hesitate to buy another one of that brand. If you can find an Interstate battery dealer, get one, they're excellent batteries.
Budd

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You need to do a current check on this vehicle dude and see exactly how much current this truck is drawing. It sounds like something is either on or backfeeding current when you don't expect it to be.
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"Carolina Watercraft Works" < snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
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Power = energy. Resistance (conventional light bulbs, in this case) converts energy into heat and disapates it. Energy is used to heat the filaments it is lost to the battery. Dirty connections also heat up as they are resistances.
Burn a 12V bulb for a few minutes and stick you tongue to it if you don't think power is being converted to heat.
Budd

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Sorry once again Budd, but it really doesn't work that way. While it is true that a bulb converts electrical energy into heat and light, it has nothing at all to do with the conversation. I could go into a long winded explanation but you would just ignore it so I'll just use some simple equations. I take it that you are familiar with Ohm's Law, where voltage represented by E in the equation E = I * R with "I" being current and "R" being resistance. Power can also be calculated as P = E * I where once again "E" being voltage and "I" being current. Using these equations, the current flow in a circuit "I" can be calculated if the voltage "E" and resistance "R" are known by rewriting the formula as I = E / R. I probably shouldn't need to go any further but since it is you, I will. As you should know, if you increase the size of the denominator in a fraction, its value goes DOWN, not up. For an example, if our battery is putting out 12V and we have 6 ohms of resistance in our imaginary circuit (lets say the bulb), using Ohms calculation of I = E / R we have I = 12 / 6 which equals 2 Amps. Now we will make our connections really dirty and for the sake of keeping the math simple for you, they are so dirty they add another 6 ohms and effectively double the resistance to our circuit. Now our calculation comes out to I = 12 / 12 which is the original bulb plus our really dirty connection and now the current flow is just 1 amp. Since the capacity of a battery is measured in amp hours, it should be obvious to you that the added resistance will allow the battery to go twice as long.
As for Power or "P", we can calculate that as well. In our first example, the battery put out 12 volts and 2 amps were passing thru our circuit so P E * I or P = 12 * 2 which means our bulb was providing 24 watts of light. With our second example that included you dirty connections, P now equals 12 * 1 where the current was effectively cut in half due to the added resistance which means our bulb is now only providing 12 watts of light so as I said in the previous post, resistance in his connections will extend the life of his battery but at a reduced light output. Of course, these simple calculations make assumptions about the characteristics of a light bulb that are not completely accurate but that has nothing to do with the point being made and that is adding resistance to a series circuit with a fixed voltage reduces the current draw and power of the circuit.
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"Budd Cochran" < snipped-for-privacy@preciscom.net> wrote in message
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And you were too long winded anyway, so I gnored it.
Tom, I don't care how you manipulate formulae to suit your pupose, you are wrong, the battery will drain faster due to a heavier load, it will not charge sufficiently if there is too much circuit resistance and that will add to his problem.
Good Lord Almighty!!
Budd

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Budd, you are one stupid asshole and as usual, not man enough to admit to even the simplest of errors. I can see why you got to where you are in life, which happens to be nowhere. Any way you want to spin it chucky, Ohms laws and simple algebra show clearly that also as usual, you don't know WTF you are talking about. A heavier load means more current draw, not less and increasing the resistance is a series circuit REDUCES current draw. I gotta say that Roy has Buddism down flat.
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"Budd Cochran" < snipped-for-privacy@preciscom.net> wrote in message
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And you resort to insults . . .
Budd

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They are not insults Budd, they are accurate observations. Even when faced with simple science and freshman algebra disproving what you say, you are still not man enough to admit that you were wrong. At least that part about you has never changed. Perhaps you should not answer peoples questions as your lack of knowledge and cowardice to admit to even a simple error may get someone injured or killed and cause serious damage to their vehicle.
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"Budd Cochran" < snipped-for-privacy@preciscom.net> wrote in message
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Well, so much for this thread.
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Laszlo Almasi
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