Bio-Diesel Update

All,
Just wanted to give a quick update on my experiences so far using "BioWillie" bio-diesel. I think it's important that we keep sharing
our experiences on this subject, good and bad, since many of us (in the U.S.) will see this alternative fuel become more common.
I filled up with B20 and have driven a few hundred miles now. As others have experienced, my engine seems to be a little quieter than it was. I have not noticed any power loss, but I'm not sure that I would notice it since I drive like an old man. :-)
#2 BioWillie was 2.599 per gallon. Regular #2 diesel was 2.799. (North Dallas, Texas).
I have noticed a "sharper" odor from the exhaust. I don't know how else to explain the smell. The source of the oil used to make biodiesel will alter the odor. I have read that "BioWillie" is made from soy bean oil.
No complaints thus far.
Craig C.
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I'm wondering how that stuff will do up here in MA where it get's damn cold. Can you prevent gelling?
Roy

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Roy wrote:

According to the "BioWillie" web site (http://www.wnbiodiesel.com/products.html )
"Biodiesel has a higher gel point. 100% Biodiesel, referred to as B100, gets slushy at 32?F. A blend of 20% Biodiesel, 80% regular diesel, B20, has a gel point of 7?F. Like regular diesel, the gel point can be lowered further with additives such as kerosene, which are blended into winter diesel in cold-weather areas."
Craig C.
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I was discussing B/D with my stepfather and he mentioned that he understood the B/D (100%) did not offer the same lubrication levels as regular diesel. The reason I have been looking into this is because I plan on a diesel for my next truck and plan on making my own...possibly running 100% B/D.
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A few issues ago in a Diesel Truck Mag, I read an article about B/D, it talked (as I recall) about gelling, lubricity and all that.

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Carolina Watercraft Works wrote:

I make and burn my own biodiesel. You are right about the lubrication levels, it isn't the same as petro diesel. Biodiesel has better lubrication. Before you buy any equipment let me know. I'll clue you in to the good deals and what to avoid. If you want to research it on your own, http://biodiesel.infopop.cc is a great place to start.
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7 degrees then you have to start adding stuff. I'm a little hesitant at first look. I think I might wait a bit, I changed frozen filters before and it really sucks.
Informative site though, thanks for posting the link.
Roy

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well roy you could use bio during summer and support the bio effort if you would like then switch back to the "normal" stuff during the cold months.
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Yup, something to think about.
Roy

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Back in another life, we used to put an "additive" in semi's to prevent jelling and algae.... not needed/used any more?
Mac
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wrote:

Not like it was years ago. Now there is a "winter fuel" that we see here around mid oct. It is supposedly good for below zero I don't know for sure how cold you can run it without a additive. The algae, I've seen once in the past 10 years in a loco that sat for about 10 months. I remember 30 years ago watching as they poured a 55gal drum of alchol into a loco fuel tank to combat algae.
Roy

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Don't believe it. You need a good additive. I run a VW Jetta TDI (diesel) and have used B-20, B-5 and straight D-2. Over on TDIClub.com everyone puts an additive in the diesel fuel to prevent gelling and for lubrication. Some additives even raise the cetane rating. Winter diesel fuel blends do help some with gelling but it may not be enough depending on temperature and where you travel. Bottom line - you need a good additive regardless of the diesel fuel, and if running biodiesel in cold weather you need it more and sooner. Unless, of course you don't mind a vehicle that doesn't start or having to replace your fuel filters that get "frozen" or gel up.
John
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Don't believe what??? That you need a additive? The winter fuel here sold here does not gel at 0.
Roy
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On Tue, 19 Sep 2006 18:13:29 +0000, Craig C. wrote:

I've been running homemade B20 in a 12 valve Cummins - it's quieter by maybe 20% and has the same power and mileage. The truck is being pretty much rebuilt right now. When all the mechanicals are addressed, it'll be converted to run on straight waste oil (SVO).
The family is running homemade B100 in a Massey Ferguson farm tractor and an '82 Mercedes 300D.
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why wouldn't you use b100 instead of svo?
it was my understanding that svo would cause varnish problems. am I misinformed?
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On Sat, 23 Sep 2006 10:26:49 -0400, Chris Thompson wrote:

You hear different things from different people and groups. I think it'll be ok as long as the SVO is preheated to 180-200F. The engine will be started and brought up to temp on B100 (+ electric heaters). Most likely mix in some octane boost-cleaner every now and then.
The reason for SVO is simple economics. I can filter WVO and throw it in the tank in the bed of the pickup. BioD requires filtering, lye/methanol mix, a mixing reactor, washing tank, drying tank, storage tank and lots of time.
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