BIODIESEL FOR 2002 DODGE

Seems we are going to get a biodiesel supplier in our area soon. I would sure rather give my money to American farmers instead of Oil Men and Arabs.
Are there any reasons not to use biodiesel in a 2002 Dodge Ram 2500?
Thanks, RO
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Robert Olin
Bob's Water & Septic LLC
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Check with Cummins for their specs and comments on using Biodiesel.
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Max

Give a man a match, and he is warm for a short while. Light him on fire, and
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Max Dodge wrote:

From: www.cummins.com (Customer Assistance>FAQ>General)
What is Cummins' position on the use of Biodiesel fuel in Cummins engines?
Background
With increased interest in emissions and reducing the use of petroleum distillate based fuels, some governments and regulating bodies are encouraging the use of bio fuels. Biodiesel fuels should be considered experimental at this time. Governmental incentives and/or environmental legislation to use bio fuels may have an impact on the sales and use of Cummins engines. This document outlines Cummins criteria and parameters when using biodiesel fuel. SME or SOME 'Soy Methyl Ester' Diesel is the most common bio diesel in the U.S. and is derived from soybean oil. Soy Diesel is a biodiesel/petrodiesel blend based on SME. RME 'Rape Methyl Ester' Diesel is the most common biodiesel in Europe and is derived from rapeseed oil. These fuels are collectively known as Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME).
Fuel Characteristics
Biodiesel fuels are methyl/ethyl ester-based oxygenates derived from a broad variety of renewable sources such as vegetable oils, animal fats, and cooking oils. Their properties are similar to diesel fuel, as opposed to gasoline or gaseous fuels, and thus are capable of being used in compression ignition engines. Biodiesel fuels have a lower energy content; about 89% of #2 diesel fuel, and is therefore a less efficient fuel. Its higher viscosity range (1.9-6.0 centistokes) vs 1.3-5.8 centistokes for diesel) helps offset the lower energy content through reduced barrel/plunger leakage resulting in slightly improved injection efficiency. Combining lower energy content and slightly improved injection efficiency, biodiesel fuel provides 5-7% less energy per gallon compared to diesel fuel. The cetane value of biodiesel fuel is 40 minimum compared to 42 minimum for Cummins diesel fuel specification. Biodiesel fuel has improved lubricity compared to standard diesel fuel. There are provisional specifications for FAME issued in Germany under DIN V 51 606, and also recently through ASTM PS-121, however these standards are under development and are subject to change. For additional information, refer to the Cummins diesel fuel specifications listed in Table 1 and to the ASTM provisional specification PS-121 for biodiesel fuels.
Emissions
It is the responsibility of the user to obtain the proper local, regional, and/or national exemptions required for the use of biodiesel in any emissions regulated Cummins engine. From the Comprehensive Health and Environmental Effects testing, a fuel blend consisting of 20% biodiesel and 80% diesel fuel (B20) can yield percent reductions ranging from 16-33% in particulates, 11-25% in Carbon Monoxide (CO), and 19-32% in Hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. The B20 biodiesel fuel blend will cause an increase in NOx of 2%.
Performance and Durability Results
Cummins test data on the operating effects of biodiesel fuels indicates that typically smoke, power, and fuel economy are all reduced. However, as there are no firm industry standards on the content and properties for bio fuels, consistency and predictability of biodiesel operation is not well documented. Biodiesel provides approximately 5-7% less energy per gallon of fuel when compared to distillate fuels. To avoid engine problems when the engine is converted back to 100% distillate diesel fuel, do not change the engine rating to compensate for the power loss when operated with biodiesel fuels. Elastomer compatibility with bio diesel is still being monitored. The condition of seals, hoses, gaskets, and wire coatings should be monitored regularly. Cummins certifies its engines using the prescribed EPA and European Certification Fuels. Cummins does not certify engines on any other fuel. It is the user's responsibility to use the correct fuel as recommended by the manufacturer and allowed by EPA or other local regulatory agencies. In the United States, the EPA allows use of only registered fuels for on-highway applications. The EPA has additional alternative fuel information at: http://www.epa.gov/otaq/consumer/fuels/altfuels/altfuels.htm Given the current industry understanding of bio fuels and blending with quality diesel fuel, it would be expected that blending up to a 5% volume concentration should not cause serious problems. For customers intent on blending bio fuels above a 5% volume concentration, the following concerns represent what is currently known in the industry. Concentrations beyond 5% by volume could have an adverse effect on the engine's performance and the fuel system integrity/durability. The affects are more serious with increasing concentration levels. Areas of concern when operating with biodiesel fuels include low temperature operability (fuel gelation, filter plugging), heat content (poor fuel economy), and storage and thermal stability (filter plugging, injector deposits). The oil change interval can be affected by the use of biodiesel fuels and some applications may require shortening intervals to half of the diesel equivalent. Lube oil dilution in applications with significant part load operation will fall under this guideline. In addition, from Cummins' fuel systems suppliers, the following issues are also noted: swelling and hardening/cracking of some elastomer seals within the fuel system/engine, corrosion of fuel system and engine hardware - especially aluminum and zinc, solid particle blockage of fuel nozzles and passages, filter plugging, injector coking, higher injection pressures due to physical flow properties - reduced fuel system life, added stress and heat to injection components - especially rotary fuel pumps - increased pump seizures and early life failures, poor fuel spray atomization - reduced fuel economy. Pure biodiesel fuel is not stable and its acid content increases over time, which can damage powder metal components.
Fuel System Vehicle Issues and Storage
The oil change interval can be affected by the use of biodiesel fuel. End users are advised to use oil sampling to monitor the engine oil condition and to determine the optimum oil change interval. Pure biodiesel fuel can cause a chemical reaction with lube oil resulting in oil sludging. Elastomer compatibility with biodiesel is still being monitored. The condition of seals, hoses, gaskets, and wire coatings should be monitored regularly. Biodiesel fuels contain residual alcohol from the esterification process, which can remove deposits from fuel tanks and lines causing filter plugging during initial testing. The fuel system should be flushed with this fuel before operation, and the fuel filters will need frequent replacement in the early stages of operation in older units. Biodiesel fuels may pose low ambient temperature problems for both storage and operation. At low ambient temperatures, fuel may need to be stored in a heated building or a heated storage tank. The fuel system may require heated fuel lines, filters, and tanks. Filters may plug and fuel in the tank may solidify at low ambient temperatures if precautions are not taken. Consult your bio diesel supplier for assistance in the blending and attainment of the proper cloud point fuel. Biodiesel has poor oxidation stability, which can result in long term storage problems. The poor oxidation stability qualities may accelerate fuel oxidation in the fuel system. This is especially true in engines with electronic fuel systems because they operate at higher temperatures. Consult the fuel supplier for oxidation stability additives. Biodiesel fuel is an excellent medium for microbial growth. Microbes cause fuel system corrosion and premature filter plugging. The effectiveness of conventional anti-microbial additives, when used in biodiesel is not known. Consult your fuel and additive supplier for assistance. Care must be taken to remove water from fuel tanks. Water accelerates microbial growth. Water is naturally more prevalent in biodiesel fuels than in distillate fuels.
Warranty and the use of Biodiesel Fuel in Cummins Engines
Cummins neither approves or disapproves of the use of biodiesel fuel. Cummins is not in a position to evaluate the many variations of biodiesel fuels or other additives, and their long-term effects on performance, durability or emissions compliance of Cummins products. The use of biodiesel fuel does not affect Cummins Material and Workmanship warranty. Failures caused by the use of biodiesel fuels or other fuel additives are NOT defects of workmanship and/or material as supplied by Cummins Inc. and CANNOT be compensated under the Cummins' warranty. Bosch states in their Diesel Fuel Quality -- Common Position Paper (03/05/99) that no guarantee on FIE is given so far to any alternative fuel except for Diesel + 5% FAME. There is a major difference between operating on pure (100% concentration) biodiesel fuels and biodiesel/petro diesel fuel blends.
Another interesting article:
Cummins B5 Biodiesel Capability for Dodge Ram Pickup on Display for Visit of President Bush to Biodiesel Refinery
For Immediate Release May 17, 2005
COLUMBUS, Ind. - Environmental progress achieved by Cummins Inc.(NYSE:CMI) was displayed yesterday as part of a visit by President Bush to the Virginia Biodiesel Refinery in West Point, Virginia. A Cummins-powered Dodge Ram pickup truck with a full tank of B5 biodiesel featured as part of the display at the Refinery to highlight to the President the increasing availability of B5 biodiesel-capable vehicles.
"President Bush and his administration are making an important contribution to promoting the wider use of both diesel and biodiesel fuel," said Christine Vujovich, Cummins Vice President - Marketing and Environmental Policy. "The increased use of diesel engines will help to reduce the nation's dependency on imported oil and enhance our energy security. At the same time, the use of biodiesel will bring economic opportunities to America's farmers."
Use of B5 biodiesel will further enhance the credentials of the latest Cummins 610 Turbo Diesel in the Dodge Ram pickup truck. With 610 lb-ft of torque available and 325 hp rated power, the Cummins engine has more performance than other comparable diesels for customers who demand durable and dependable power.
Jeff Caldwell, Cummins Executive Director - DaimlerChrysler Business, commented, "The option of running the Cummins 610 Turbo Diesel with B5 biodiesel in the Dodge Ram will be seen as a significant step forward in encouraging greater use of renewable fuel. This is a popular engine - last year Cummins produced over 150,000 of the 610 Turbo Diesel engines for DaimlerChrysler who manufactures the Dodge Ram. DaimlerChrysler is to be commended for taking a leading role in helping the nation to reduce its dependency on imported oil."
Pure biodiesel is a natural substance derived from soybean and other oil seed crops grown in the U.S. which is both biodegradable and environmentally sustainable. B5 biodiesel is a fuel blend of 5 percent pure biodiesel with 95 percent standard petroleum diesel, and is the most commonly acceptable specification for heavy-duty engines. The use of biodiesel has grown dramatically from just 500,000 gallons in 1999 to 30 million gallons in 2004. Estimates now anticipate an annual demand of 5 billion gallons by 2012 for renewable fuels, including both biodiesel and ethanol in North America.
--
Ken



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My mechanic, a retired Cummins mechanic, says the 'green bean' is the best fuel to use.
Says to change the fuel filter more often as the fuel cleans the tank too.
We use it in my 2002 3500 dually.
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I have some friends in the biodiesel business. They drive VW's.
They say it is recommended to run at least 2% biodiesel to increase lubricity.
Otherwise, they claim up to 100% should be OK. However, I am going to read the Cummins response posted by Max Dodge carefully.
Biodiesel, as I understand it, is using waste cooking oil from restaurants which has been processed to burn in diesel engines. Not sure if it helps farmers, but if recycling can be done cost effectively, I am all for it.
I remember when a guy would come to your house, tie and weigh your newspapers and give you a penny a pound for them. Now it is hard to get someone to take them for free. Am I dating myself?
Charles
RO wrote:

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Sorry, it was Nosey who posted the Cummins response.
Also, my friends did point out that biodiesel is not good for winter in cold climates but you should still run a min of 2% for lubricity.
And I think reducing our dependance on foreign oil is always a good thing.
Charles
Charles wrote:

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Charles wrote:

Actually, eliminating our dependence on oil from *any* source is the best thing.
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