Brake Rotors Question

Hi All!
Been wondering lately about replacement of the front rotors on my 99 CTD 2500 RWD. Is there a measurement or rule of thumb used by brake shops on
when the rotors need to be replaced or is it strictly appearance, out of true criteria that's used?
Also, how many times can the rotors be resurfaced
TIA
Best to all
Fred
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Brake rotors should never be resurfaced, it just takes the life out of them. If they are warped or gouged, then just replace them otherwise they should be good to go.
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wrote:

I agree in principal - however there IS a "minimum thickness" spec cast into the rotor, and published. If the rotor is below that thickness it MUST be replaced. A very light clean-up cut will often get rid of a minor pulsation, and will give a firmer pedal and faster, more effective break-in. Usually a rotor is good for 2 or 3 of these "light" cuts.
However, today, USUALLY a rotor requires much more than that "light cut" to clean up, in my experience - and Rotors are not much more expensive than the machining cost - unless you can do it yourself.
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wrote:

Pure bullshit. I have had mine turned every time that I have replaced the brake pads. I have only replaced the rotors once, the last brake job, and have over 260,000 miles on the vehicle. The pads last longer and there is no pull to either side when braking.
beekeep
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CTD
on
of
them.
should
LOL, just because you like to waste money and beat down your rotors doesn't mean anything. If you get to someone who actually knows what they are doing, they may be able to resurface them properly without killing them but in most cases, they just cut the hell out of them which serves no purpose. As it seems, the rotors used on Dodge trucks are barely thick enough to do the job as it is (with the number of warped rotor cases I see here) so making them even thinner makes no sense. I used to get them cut all of the time as well but found no benefit in doing that. If the rotors are warped or gouged, I just replace them since cutting them is not all that much less in cost and the thicker new rotors are safer anyway.
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Both by appearance and by meaurement. If they are excessively pitted and (being a '99) I would replace rather than cutting them down. If you cut them down you will have warped rotors and replace the in probably less than a year anyway. Did the rotors on my '97 van two years ago because of warpage.

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Fred wrote:

The brake rotors on your truck can be resurfaced an unlimited amount of times as long as the finished thickness is more than 1.285". If your wear exceeds this amount you have to replace them. Hub & rotor assemblies are available for your truck for just under $100.00 each at Napa stores. New rotors are better than re-surfaced rotors. If you can afford new ones get them. www.napaonline.com
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I have resurfaced rotors and can agree that every rotor is stamped with the min spec. rust sometimes makes them tough to read or convert mm to in. but there are book specs to go by also. Selling brakes needs to be a system thing. Don't just slap pads on and expect new brakes. To get back close to original performance, Rotors must be trued and calipers lubed, bushings and anti rattle springs replaced, fluid flushed to get the system up to par. Think about it, how long do springs, bushings and fluid stay good at high rotor temps over 40k miles? People spend 50 bucks for pads 100 bucks or more for labor and pass on the 5 dollar bushings or springs and 5-10 dollar rotor turning. You get LESS than what you paid for when you short cut a few cheap items. If rotors are in need of replacement, spend a bit more and get the drilled vented models for better than new performance, and longer life with no warping.

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