Built like a Mercedes (?)

Page 13 of 17  
On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 11:01:02 -0000, "Huw"


both the 12 valve and the 24 valve are well known and very respected around here mate, primarily because they work well.
at least thats how we judge stuff here in the us old boy.
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I have the Cummins ISB, which is one generation back. Having noted the better efficiency of diesel fuel over gasoline, I made the decision to buy a higher cost vehicle in order to increase my efficency long term. This fails to mention the benefits of having a viable vehicle long after most have worn out. I get about 22MPG when hauling a load on the trailer at 55MPH. I'll average 19.5 MPG over a long distance trip with speeds of 75MPH and periods of travel in urban traffic.
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Max

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These engines are at their most efficient between 1500 and 2000erpm where they actually produce power at around 215g/kw/hour which is way better than most small car engines. The only drawback that I can imagine is a supposed [supposed because I have never driven one in a light truck application] narrow rev band. I assume that it revs more than 2350 in your truck. In the tractor maximum power is at 2200 but yours must surely reach somewhere around 2750 no-load with max power at 2600? If this is the case it needs a lot of gears or it needs to be revved to the governor before upchanging [assuming a stick shift] under load up hill?
Huw
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Cummins lists this figure as 1800-1950RPM.

It'll run up to 3000RPM if manually shifted. The narrow RPM band has not been a problem, and seems ideally suited to the gearing (3.55 rear axle ratio) and travel at about 70MPH, which turns 1850-1900RPM on the engine while in OD.

Max torque runs at 420ftlbs stock, from about 1200-2800RPM. No load redline is 3400RPM or so, while loaded the PCM cuts it back to 3200 or so. Having not needed to push it, I'm not as familiar with these figures as I am on my gasoline powered vehicles.

I run an automatic trans, since the 6spd was back ordered when the truck was ordered. I have never had a situation where I let automatic shifting occur where it revved out farther than 2800RPM. This truck doesn't lack for power at low RPM, and pulls well in all gears. Towing at highway speeds in OD is easily done. If I manually shift while towing, I usually use 2100RPM or so, since I'm not interested in acceleration at that point. I manually shift prinicipally to hold gears longer than the PCM would via APPS readings. Thus I can use part throttle and hold gear, since the PCM wants MPG, not power. The PCM tries to upshift since the truck easily rolls most loads and looks to upshift ASAP.
Under hard acceleration while empty, it'll rev to 2800 automatically, while throwing the truck so hard the occupants are snugged into the seats. Do not mistake this for being pinned as one might be in a sports car. However, for moving 7000lbs, it is significant force.
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Max

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It revs significantly higher than I thought. I can see what you mean because the diesel auto landcruiser has a similar feeling but I guess less so. From only 4.2 litres it has 200hp. The Range Rover is a bit different and it has been chipped from 185hp to over 200hp from the BMW 3.0l, which has also improved the economy [from an average of 27 to just under 30mpg] but its five speed is tuned so that the engine torque is not used as much and it changes down early and so the engine revs more.
Huw
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<< I have the Cummins ISB, which is one generation back. Having noted the better efficiency of diesel fuel over gasoline, I made the decision to buy a higher cost vehicle in order to increase my efficency long term>>
I, too, drive a diesel as one of my rides, although it is a Mercedes 300SD, 1983. I have over 338,000 miles on it and it still runs, and looks, good. However, a disappointing thing has happened as of late--diesel fuel tends to be amongst the priciest fuels, sometimes even aceing out premium at the pump. For a fuel that is just a cut or so above lubricating oil, I find this hard to believe.
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For my use, even at the higher price, my MPG vs. a gasoline powered truck of the same model makes diesel a more economical choice.
Diesel is more costly now because of more detailed refining, such as the removal of sulfer. However, I'll agree that it makes little sense that fuel that used to cost about half what a gallon of gasoline did, now costs up to 25% more than a gallon of gasoline.
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Max

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wrote:

max, you naughty boy! i do believe that in the mist of the early morning, i hear the voice of max, yelling gleefully, "fish on".
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wrote:

Pricing today is based on the number of BTUs you are buying - whether propane, coal, gasoline or diesel oil you will find the pricing very close. And Diesel contains some 20?% more energy than gasoline per unit of volume. *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
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<clare at snyder.on.ca> wrote in message

Specific net calorific values are as below. There is nothing like a 20% difference between petrol and diesel. Fuel is priced according to supply and demand as well as value in comparison with other fuels so diesel and kero should be cheaper in Summer when domestic and industrial non transport use is lowest. The rise in price in relation to gasoline during recent years is a reflection of its increasing market share in relation to refining capacity as well as an element of opportunism by the oil companies.
toe/tonne
Refinery gas 1.150 LPG 1.130 Ethane 1.130 Motor Gasoline 1.070 Jet Fuel 1.065 Kerosene 1.045 Naphtha 1.075 Gas/Diesel Oil 1.035
As you can see there is less than 5% difference in energy density between them by weight. Gas [natural] and crude oil also vary in energy value according to region. If you really want the relationships I can provide them to you with a click.
Huw
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All that means to me as a consumer is that they've invented a way to structure price for more profit.
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Max

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It makes perfect sense Max, it's supply and demand. You want it, they have it, and your gonna pay for it. Now they can justify their higher price by claiming that the sudden increase in demand has pushed their ability to provide it along with gasoline which is of course to a point completely accurate but in a free enterprise system...
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If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving

"Max Dodge" < snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net> wrote in message
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On 2006-02-09 16:11:45 -0800, Pooh Bear

The EPA is completely full of shit FYI, just look at there mileage ratings.
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Here are the figures for the USA which actually shows only 11400 miles per car overall with midwestern states actually posting lower mileage at 10700 miles which goes very much against what has been implied by some posters here, particularly Steve and Clare from Canada. Of course Canada might be at variance but I doubt it. I have always assumed that mileage would not vary greatly from one country to another because it is primarily governed by the amount of *time* people feel comfortable devoting to what is essentially a waste of time.
Here is a reference to a comprehensive and authoritative source http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/rtecs/chapter3.html
Huw
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I have always assumed that mileage would not vary

I should say that I always like to quote machinery use, even cars, by hours of use rather than mileage. I would guess that 'average' use doesn't vary much outside of between 350 to 400 hours per year wherever you are. Now let's see, 400 hours times say an average of 30mph is........ yes 12000 miles which sounds about right. Hell, I should be a transport planner or something, my talents are wasted here LOL. My Land Rover has done 150,000 miles at an average [which I worked out with care some time ago] of 15mph is 10,000 hours over 21 years or 475 hours per year which looks to be about right at about an hour and a third a day, every day. To complete the same 10,000 hours of use my Land Cruiser will average 31mph so will have to total 310,000 miles. At present I complete less than 650 hours per year, which is long enough, to complete 20,000 miles approximately so will need another 10 years of use to match the LR's total use.
10,000 hours is 50 weeks of a full 40 hours solid for five years. Yeeeek!
Huw
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I hope you think interesting thoughts to entertain yourself, Huwie...
As I have quite a nice car (and drive very little, 5K mi p.a. tops) I sometimes look forward to a longer trip, e.g. to Manchester or to the Continent. However, after about two hours the pleasure fades...
DAS
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"Huw" <hedydd[nospam]@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
news: snipped-for-privacy@individual.net...
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Same here. Although I do not dislike driving, like you about two hours is as much as I would like to limit myself per day. Also a different car is nice now and again. I'm lucky in that respect. I have just returned from an 85 mile journey with the Panda and broke 90mpg overall. I wasn't even trying for the first half where I noticed the average tantalisingly close to 70 mpg, so on the return journey I went all out for economy and actually averaged 90mpg and rising as I arrived home.
Huw
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<pat on back>
DAS
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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 00:26:16 -0000, "Huw"

Only one problen, Huw - your "comprehensive and authorative" source is 12 years out of date. In that 12 years many farmers have had to resort to working "off farm" to make ends meet. These farmers need to drive significant distances to and from work - adding to the average mileage. Also, the price of housing has skyrocketed in the major urban centers - and more people are buying homes in the "outlying areas" because that is all they can afford, and/or because they do not want the inner city urban lifestyle. So they spend 5 hours a day commuting, at average speeds just less than 80KM per hour (or 50 M per hour) - or 125 miles each way. It is a HORRENDOUS waste of time, but the high paid jobs are in the city - and the homes and lifestyle these higher earners want are not. One thing that DOES tend to keep the average down is the fact many households have more than one car - and even more than one car per driver - so the "good" car, or the "toy" or the "RV" may get significantly lower mileage. This brings down the average miles per vehicle, but not the average miles per driver. One neighbour's Corolla gets about 50 times the miles his Golf gets, because the Golf sits in the garage most of the time, while the Corolla does the 60 mile (each way) commute 5 days a week. Any winter out-of town trips are on the Corolla - the shiny polished Golf only goes out when the sun is shining and the roads are dry.
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<clare at snyder.on.ca> wrote in message wrote:

.These farmers need to drive

You think only the US have more than 1 vehicle per houshold? You know I can easily get the figures for you if you insist. But first........... Latest US figures for 2001 can be found here. It is easy to work out that the average has risen to around 11850 miles per vehicle Cars average 11400,SUV's 13200, PUtrucks 12100, RV's 5900.
http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/rtecs/nhts_survey/2001/tablefiles/t0464 (2005).pdf
If you must bullshit, you'd better make sure the figures back you up.
Huw
.

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