camper help

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Was he getting the truck up on plane, with the front tires bouncing about 6-8" off the road? :)
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Well, probably not, but I can't say for sure (The sheer terror, ya know). The side to side sway was scary enough. If he'd tried to avoid any size rabbit, for example, we would have most likely rolled over on a side.
I looked under it a couple days later and he had coil over boost springs in the back with tires a little bigger than stock and the stock front sway bar, iirc.
-- Budd Cochran

Rode
road.
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nope, long box. http://inlinediesel.com/trucks/3gen/1/index.html
--
Nathan W. Collier
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On Sat, 29 Oct 2005 19:29:41 -0600, "Nathan W. Collier"

nice trucks. i still like the srw ones the best, just the looks of those duals is wierd to me...........but i know they serve a purpose.
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i like the SRW as well, but there are advantages both ways. i like the tire size options i have with the SRW and ours is definately easier to park at the mall than our DRW. the advantage of the DRW comes apparent when youre towing a trailer weighing more than the truck. ive pulled our trailer with both trucks and the DRW truck definately controls it better. its not that the SRW doesnt control it....it just doesnt control it as good as the DRW.
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wrote:

Nate.. just one of those "logical" things that usually don't meet with reality, but I've always figured that the best use for a DRW was for things like a slide-in, where you have more of a tendency to sway from being kinda top heavy..
We saw a nice rig on a recent trip... 3/4 ton ford with a huge slide in that raised and lowered like a popup.. cab height when on the road... The guy said that he drove offroad a lot and between high center of gravity and cross winds, he got rid of his old slide-in and got the "popup" one... He was pulling a 20' fishing boat with an atv rack on the trailer..lol
mac
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i figure with a standard slide in i could take turns with the wifey sleeping/driving. a popup is only usable when its popped up.
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Nathan W. Collier
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wrote:

This one looked like you could sleep in it, from what I saw when he popped the back door... it was like a cab high topper when down... Damn thing probably cost more than a new truck, though..
mac
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Nate I had a slide in cab over camper that I carried around for for about 10 years in two different trucks. One being a Dodge Cummins 2500. Never had a problem with control. Mine was only a 8.5 model that weighed in about 2900 pounds fully loaded. They just take getting use to, keeping in mind your center of gravity and height clearance. Couple things I discovered was make sure you have quality sway bars front and rear. I used the skinny hydraulic shocks that connect from the cab to the front door jam/fender area. A lot of people say you don't need them and they didn't want to drill holes in their truck but it takes out all that forward bucking bounce a cab over can sometimes give you. Forget about the airbags in they rear...... they simply didn't work for me. Instead I went with Helwig progressive overloads. What I did was have extended shackles made up so that I could remove the shackles when empty, thus giving me the factory ride because with the Helwigs on while empty it will beat you to death. I didn't use the Helwig for the overload capacity but for the benefit of taking out any sway and they worked great for that. In your case with a 3500, you're in better shape than I was. In addition to hauling the camper around I pulled my boat on most trips which weighted in about 3,000 pounds. Sounds like you are talking about a 11 or 12 foot slide in but I think if you took a hard look at the 9.5 or 10 foot model you will be surprised at the room you have in them, especially if they have a slide out dining area section which wasn't available when I had mine. Todays slide in campers are build much better than when I had mine and the center of gravity is much lower in them now. Probable over 90% of the cab over campers going down the road are overloaded but that is the nature of the beast, I know I was most of the time.
Jerry
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? i have _no_ idea what youre referencing. do you have an online source available to show/tell me a little more about it?

i used to hate airbags but have since come to believe they were beneficial. please explain.

ive since decided to fine one even with the end of my truck bed so that extending my hitch wouldnt be an issue.
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I've never used air bags, but Timbren springs work great. http://www.timbren.com /
--
Ken



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Nathan W. Collier wrote:

I don't recall what they were named or called. take a look at the truck at the top of the picture here.... http://www.lancecampers.com/ . See the long shocks connecting the overhang to the front of the truck.

All the air bags done for me was give me a harsher ride when unloaded. You can pump them up to increase payload but think about what you are really doing. They are nothing more than hard air spacers between frame and axle and nothing to cushion a rut or pot hole when you hit it hard. Besides just when you don't need it they will blow in a turn or start a slow leak that you can't patch and you will be going down the road like a crab. I just didn't have any faith in them for the long haul. The springs that Nosey mentioned should work well, especially if you leave the camper on 24/7 but I took mine off all the time and by simply removing the four separate end shackles on the springs I was back at stock ride and the overload springs were still bolted to the axle. Worked for me.

Then the 8.5 foot or even the 9.5 foot model would work well for you.
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8><---

8><---
I left the Timbren springs on all the time. When the truck is empty they do not have any effect on the ride. I actually forgot they were there. I didn't think to remove them when I sold the truck.
--
Ken



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gotcha, thanks. i wouldnt want to drill my truck like that either.
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Jerry,
If I may . . . I suggest you look at AirRide Technologies. The most common cause of air suspension failure is a leak in an improperly installed line.
Helper bags can be deflated to a couple pounds of pressure just to avoid chafing.
-- Budd Cochran

source
beneficial.
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Budd Cochran wrote:

I don't need to look, I'm speaking from actual experience. I've bought, installed, and used them. They did not perform up to expectations or as advertised. Anything subject to dependence of air to operate/perform are subject to leaks....... like a tire, no lines there. Why take the chance when you are miles from nowhere out in the boondocks.
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common
line.
Steel springs break too and that I've experienced.
Give me a bit more info because there's a lot of folks here in Moab with airsprings that have not had any problems.
What did you drop them (PSI) to when unloaded? Was the problem just a stiffer ride? What pressure did you inflate them to? Where they the proper size for your load?
Budd
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Budd Cochran wrote:

Budd, how many trucks of your own have you used air bags on while carrying a slide in camper? No, not some National Guard story or some forklift, but your own personal truck and camper. My truck wasn't a 2500 as I mistakenly said but actually a 1989 D250 4x4 with Cummins. Maybe they work better today......... Maybe they would work on Nate's truck with the longer wheel base and longer rear springs but they didn't work for me then. I really don't need to diagnose why as I found out what did work and posted same. Then again if you have a lot of personal experience with your own truck and your own cab over camper you might shed some light to those that desire to here your story.
Jerry
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proper
Ok, none, for very long. I was given an eight foot cab-over slide-in that needed major repair before using. Even as an empty shell, it made my stock suspended 79 D-150 sway a bit. I never got it finished as we decided to move to Utah. There, happy now?
I am offended by your comment about my using all my experiences to aid others.Why can't I?
I have driven friends rigs, however, with airbags and with other spring assists . . but wait, that's not admissible, is it?

Same load range. Personally, I think you had a better suspended rig for heavy usage that the newer designs. Btw, that would have been a "W"-250. iirc.

And I was trying to get info that maybe someone else might find useful, that's all. Since you do not wish to share info that could help someone, that is your decision. And, btw, Firestone bags are used on many, if not most, semi-tractors today. They must work pretty darn good.

Ok, Jerry, I see your point, I think, and I don't think not too much of it. I think all our experiences are useful to someone at some time, somewhere. I do try to use only the ones that have an application to the topic discussed, like the hydraulic clutch on the forklift and the hydraulic clutch on the truck. Similar system, same operation, differing vehicles . . .kinda like talking about one on a Dodge pickup and a Peterbuilt dump truck . . .if it has one.
-- Budd Cochran
WARNING!!!
Poster still believes that intelligence, logic,
common sense, courtesy, and religious beliefs
are still important in our society, and might include
them in his posts.
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Budd Cochran wrote:

Because you don't have any so why attempt to show other wise.....

No it is not. I have driven a couple 18 wheelers for friends for a few miles. Doesn't make me a OTR driver now does it.

Better suspension when fully loaded yes. Required use of a kidney belt when unloaded. Airbags made it worse when unloaded.
> btw, Firestone bags are used on many, if not > most, semi-tractors today.
And none of them go off road onto trails such as Nate said he needed them for. Besides their main use in that application is to level the load, not more load or control of a top heavy camper. Apples to oranges.
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