Color codes alternator wires

I posted this in rec.autos.tech and either they think their too smart to answer or they don't really know.
Old dodge van, 70's vintage. Alternator wires from back view, two small
gauge ones, one is green other red. Two terminals one at 11 oclock one at 2 oclock. Where does the red go and the green? Please don't make me call the dodge dealer for this, haha.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They probably didn't answer because you didn't give enough information. Exactly what year and size alt. Different years use different color wires but in this case, I don't think that it really matters and the field wires should be interchangeable.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving
"ohwell" < snipped-for-privacy@thatstheusenet.org> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He didn't like that answer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nope, just being careful, don't want to blow something and spend more money if you are wrong. Autozone says the red goes closest to the power wire which is still attached to the alternator. It does not make sense they would colorize the wires if there was not a specific terminal to which each goes. If it turns out you are right you have my apologies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As I've explained before; the red wire is 12 volt key on, the green wire goes back to the voltage regulator where it is pulled to ground to complete the saturation of the alternator field. Since the two wires perform entirely different functions as noted above, it makes perfect sense that they'd be different colors. The autozoo diagrams do not specify which terminal gets which color wire, their diagrams are simple block diagrams. If it mattered, the terminals wouldn't be the same and they'd be marked. (as GM did, as Ford did, etc.)
Understanding HOW the circuit works negates any notions you may have regarding 'they must be different, there's different colored wires.'
The field circuit is totally isolated, that's why it's called an isolated field circuit. Matters not which terminal gets either color wire. Prior to 1970, you'd have a point (of sorts).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can see that. Whether he likes it or not, it is what it is.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving
"aarcuda69062" < snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry, it is a 77 b-100 1/2 ton tradesman van. I think the alternator is the smaller 65? amp one, double grove pulley. Does that help? I guess I really do not understand why they color code the wires if they are interchangeable and seems I remember something about "polarizing" the alternator which would, I'm guessing, imply they are not?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They are color coded because they do different things. One is the 12V feed wire and the other is the ground which is controlled by the regulator. If they were the same color, it would be near impossible to diagnose a wiring problem with the alternator. The alternator in your vehicle has isolated field windings and as such, the wires are interchangeable. If they needed to be connected to a specific terminal, the connectors for each terminal would be different and the two wires would only fit one way.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

feed
'isolated' had nothing to do with it, ignoramus
POLARITY is what matters
glad to see you're still around spouting off your stupidity, and that it's still very easy to bitch slap your ignorant ass into next week
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
message

is
I
If
wiring
isolated
needed
LOL, once again, you show your brilliant intellect and that astonishing single digit IQ.

Really, please explain the polarity on an AC device. Now, you do know what AC means, right?!?!?!?!?!

LOL, I do find it funny to watch the stupid and the ignorant pat themselves on the back for the great job that they believe that they have done when in reality, ail they have done is screw the pooch and the rest of us either laugh or just feel sorry for them or in this case, you.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ohwell wrote:

I have a factory service manual for '77 D- W- and S-series trucks. The electrical portion would be the same for your B-series. The 18ga red and 18ga light-green wires feed the alternator field. The red is switched to 12V when the ignition switch is in the "run" position. The green is driven to ground by the regulator, using a PWM (Pulse Width Modulated) signal. The more current required from the alternator, the higher the duty cycle.
Because the output of the stator to the rectifiers (inside the unit) is AC, it makes zero difference in the function of the alternator which wire is connected to which terminal (and the service manual makes no distinction).
Bryan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok thanks to you and Tbone for the information. I stand corrected in my assumptions. ;-)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.